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  • Tuesday, March 02, 2021 2:39 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Traditional Diets Nasty, Brutish, and Short? Part 1
    by Sally Fallon
    Author of Nourishing Traditions
    Part one of a three part article

     

     

    In order to believe that our society has "progressed," we must believe first that the lives of our ancestors were indeed nasty, brutish and short. But, as study after study has confirmed, the health of traditional peoples was vastly superior to that of modern industrial man.

     

    Modern technology—father of the combine harvester, the automobile, the flush toilet and the fully electric house—does not bestow his blessings without a price. These twentieth century tools that have conferred freedom of movement and comfort, and freedom from drudgery and dirt, leave dark trailings of pollution, congestion and alienation. This much is apparent. The wise use of technology has exercised the minds of thinkers and writers for a fair number of decades.

     

    Less obvious is the connection between modern technology and health. Conventional wisdom asserts that our current health crisis—in which one in three people in the Western world develops cancer and almost half suffer from heart disease—will be solved by more technology, not less, and that disease, like drudgery and dirt, will give way to a combination of innovation and funding.

     

    My colleague, Dr. Tom Cowan, likes to tell the story of a typical patient who comes in for a checkup. "It's just a precaution," says the patient, "I'm actually very healthy." Yes, he had his tonsils removed when he was a youngster; he had his wisdom teeth taken out and his teeth straightened with braces; he has a mouth full of fillings and several root canals; he had a hernia operation a few years ago and his back bothers him sometimes. True, he often feels under stress, even depressed, and wishes he had more energy, but he passes these off as normal conditions, just what one would expect in the course of an average life-span.

     

    A family history reveals a sister who died at the age of 40 from breast cancer and a father who is senile with Alzheimers living in a nursing home. Both his children were born by Cesarean section. They needed extensive (and expensive) orthodontics. His daughter suffers from allergies and his son attends a special school for the hyperactive and learning disabled.


    What allows Dr. Cowan's typical patient to claim that he is healthy is, indeed, the same technology that gave us the vacuum cleaner and the computer. Without the modern inventions used to shore up his teeth, safely remove his tonsils, repair his hernia and help his wife give birth, our typical patient would be a toothless, childless cripple—or dead before adulthood.


    But the technology that allows him to fly to California in five hours and illumine his living room with the flick of a switch was not able to save his sister from cancer nor his father from Alzheimers. The solutions proffered for his depression and fatigue, his daughter's allergies and his son's difficulties in school are palliative at best, and dangerous at worst.

     

    Modern technology allows the appearance of health but not the substance. The age of solutions has a health crisis it cannot solve. Although heart disease and cancer were rare at the turn of the century, today these two diseases strike with increasing frequency, in spite of billions of dollars in research to combat them, and in spite of tremendous advances in diagnostic and surgical techniques. In America, one person in three suffers from allergies, one in ten will have ulcers and one in five is mentally ill.

     

    Every year, one quarter of a million infants are born with a birth defect, who then undergo expensive heroic surgery, or are hidden away in institutions. Other degenerative diseases—arthritis, multiple sclerosis, digestive disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, Alzheimers's, epilepsy and chronic fatigue—afflict a significant majority of our citizens. Learning disabilities such as dyslexia and hyperactivity make life miserable for seven million young people—not to mention their parents.

     

    These diseases were extremely rare only a generation or two ago. Today, chronic illness afflicts nearly half of all Americans and causes three out of four deaths in the United States. Most tragically, these diseases, formerly the purview of the very old, now strike our children and those in the prime of life. We have almost forgotten that our natural state is one of balance, wholeness and vitality.

     

    Things were not so bad back in the 1930's, but the situation was already serious enough to cause one Cleveland, Ohio dentist to be concerned. Dr. Weston Price was reluctant to accept the conditions exhibited by his patients as normal. Rarely did an examination of an adult patient reveal anything but rampant decay, often accompanied by serious problems elsewhere in the body, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes, intestinal complaints and chronic fatigue. (They called it neurasthenia in Price's day.)

     

    But it was the dentition of younger patients that alarmed him most. Price observed that crowded, crooked teeth were becoming more and more common, along with what he called "facial deformities"—overbites, narrowed faces, underdevelopment of the nose, lack of well-defined cheekbones and pinched nostrils. Such children invariably suffered from one or more complaints that sound all too familiar to mothers of the 1990's: frequent infections, allergies, anemia, asthma, poor vision, lack of coordination, fatigue and behavioral problems. Price did not believe that such "physical degeneration" was God's plan for mankind. He was rather inclined to believe that the Creator intended physical perfection for all human beings, and that children should grow up free of ailments.

     

    He had heard utopian stories about the good health of primitive cultures and resolved to find out if the "backward" societies that American was intent on evangelizing and colonizing were indeed healthier than his own. For the next ten years, he traveled to various isolated parts of the earth, where the inhabitants had no contact with "civilization," in order to study their health and physical development.

     

    His investigations took him to isolated Swiss villages and a windswept island off the coast of Scotland. He studied traditional Eskimos, Indian tribes in Canada and the Florida Everglades, Southsea islanders, Aborigines in Australia, Maoris in New Zealand, Peruvian and Amazonian Indians and tribesmen in Africa.

     

    Once Price had gained the confidence of the tribal or village elders, he did what came naturally to him—he counted cavities. Imagine his surprise at finding groups of people in whom less than 1% of the permanent teeth were decayed. He found 14 isolated groups in all where tooth decay was rare to nonexistent, in people who had never seen a dentist and never brushed their teeth. Freedom from caries always went hand in hand with freedom from disease, both chronic disease like cancer and heart disease, and infectious disease like tuberculosis, which in Price's day afflicted much of the world in epidemic proportions.

     

    These studies occurred at a time when there still existed remote pockets of humanity untouched by modern inventions; but when one modern invention, the camera, allowed Price to make a permanent record of the people he studied. The photographs Price took, the descriptions of what he found and his startling conclusions are preserved in a book considered a masterpiece by many nutrition researchers who followed in Price's footsteps: Nutrition and Physical Degeneration.(1) Yet this compendium of ancestral wisdom is all but unknown to today's parents and the medical community.

     

    Nutrition and Physical Degeneration is the kind of book that changes the way people view the world, because it describes not only societies in which excellent health was the norm, but also because it shows us how healthy people look. Healthy people have faces that are broad, well-formed and noble. Their teeth fill the smile with a band of dazzling whiteness, as even and perfect as. . . false teeth.

     

    Price took photograph after photograph of beautiful smiles, and noted that "healthy primitives" were invariably cheerful and optimistic. Such people were characterized by "splendid physical development." The women gave birth with ease. Their babies rarely cried and their children were energetic and hearty. Many others have reported a virtual absence of degenerative disease, particularly cancer, in isolated, so-called "primitive" groups.(2)


    Price observed a number of societies in transition where stores or outposts had been established and native foods were replaced by the products of western civilization—sugar, white flour, condensed milk, canned foods, chocolate, jams and pastries—what Price called the "displacing foods of modern commerce." His photographs capture the suffering caused by these foodstuffs—chiefly rampant tooth decay. Even more startling, they show the change in facial development that occurred with modernization.


    Parents who had changed their diets gave birth to children who no longer exhibited the tribal patterns. Their faces were more narrow, their teeth crowded, their nostrils pinched. These faces do not beam with optimism, like those of their healthy ancestors. The photographs of Dr. Weston Price demonstrate with great clarity that the "displacing foods of modern commerce" do not provide sufficient nutrients to allow the body to reach its full genetic potential—neither the complete development of the bones in the body and the head, nor the fullest expression of the various systems that allow humankind to function at optimal levels—immune system, nervous system, digestion and reproduction.

     

    The diets of the healthy "primitives" Price studied were all very different: In the Swiss village where Price began his investigations, the inhabitants lived on rich dairy products—unpasteurized milk, butter, cream and cheese—dense rye bread, meat occasionally, bone broth soups and the few vegetables they could cultivate during the short summer months. The children's teeth were covered in green slime but Price found only about one percent decay.

     

    The children went barefoot in frigid streams during weather that forced Dr. Price and his wife to wear heavy wool coats; nevertheless childhood illnesses were virtually nonexistent and there had never been a single case of TB in the village.

     

    Hearty Gallic fishermen living off the coast of Scotland consumed no dairy products. Fish formed the mainstay of the diet, along with oats made into porridge and oatcakes. Fishheads stuffed with oats and chopped fish liver was a traditional dish, and one considered very important for growing children. The Eskimo diet, composed largely of fish, fish roe and marine animals, including seal oil and blubber, allowed Eskimo mothers to produce one sturdy baby after another without suffering any health problems or tooth decay.

     

    Well-muscled hunter-gatherers in Canada, the Everglades, the Amazon, Australia and Africa consumed game animals, particularly the parts that civilized folk tend to avoid—organ meats, blood, marrow and glands, particularly the adrenal glands—and a variety of grains, tubers, vegetables and fruits that were available. African cattle-keeping tribes like the Masai consumed no plant foods at all—just meat, blood and milk.

     

    Southsea islanders and the Maori of New Zealand ate seafood of every sort—fish, shark, octopus, shellfish, sea worms—along with pork meat and fat, and a variety of plant foods including coconut, manioc and fruit. Whenever these isolated peoples could obtain sea foods they did so—even Indian tribes living high in the Andes.

     

    Insects were another common food, in all regions except the Arctic. The foods that allow people of every race and every climate to be healthy are whole natural foods—meat with its fat, organ meats, whole milk products, fish, insects, whole grains, tubers, vegetables and fruit—not newfangled concoctions made with white sugar, refined flour and rancid and chemically altered vegetable oils.

     

    Modern nutrition researchers are showing renewed interest in the foodways of our ancestors, but myths about primitive diets abound. The first is easily dismissed—that traditional diets were largely vegetarian. Anthropological data confirm what Price found, namely that throughout the globe, all societies show a preference for animal foods and fats.(3) Modern scientific literature does not support the claims made for vegetarian diets.(4)


    To be continued...


    endnotes...

     

    1. Weston A Price, DDS, Price, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, 1945, Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation, San Diego, CA, (619) 574-7763

     

    2. Zac Goldsmith, "Cancer: A Disease of Industrialization," The Ecologist, March/April 1998, 28:(2):93-99

     

    3. Abrams, H Leon, "Vegetarianism: An Anthropological/Nutritional Approach," Journal of Applied Nutrition, 1980, 32:2:70-71

     

    4. Russell Smith, "Vegetarian Studies," Health and Healing Wisdom, Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation, Winter 1998, 22:(4):30 (619) 574-7763

  • Saturday, February 27, 2021 1:49 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Mother Of All She Who Knows
    Excerpt From Womb Of Wisdom, The Sacred Journey Of Menopause... Chapter Fourteen
    Written & Illustrated by Roslyne Sophia Breillat


    After emptying, filling and replenishing for many months and many years with the spiralling phases of the Moon, her body is now rapidly changing. These subtle yet profound changes are often felt as dramatic, disorienting, disturbing and erratic. And like her beloved Mother Earth, her cyclic transformations are birthed through chaotic upheaval and a need for renewal.

    If she is experiencing intense emotional, physical or psychological chaos, this can be minimised through simplifying her outer life as much as possible. She will eventually become aware of the stillness that rests beneath disharmony and the tranquillity that rests beneath disequilibrium. For menopause is a time for clearing, for letting go, for relinquishing, for releasing, for preparing to begin anew.

    Eliminating everything unnecessary from her life will give her more quietness, space, peace and solitude for integrating this powerful flow of inner transformation and this unfamiliar new dance of change. She now needs calm and centred awareness for receptively tuning in to the erratic communication of her body’s strange and unsettling symptoms. Her regular sleeping patterns are frequently disrupted as intense physical sensations call her home to that vast space of the immortal female essence. She is completing the circle of the physical Mother and she is entering the circle of Mother of Earth, of Mother of All, of Grandmother Wisdom, of Grandmother Peace.

    This transforming process is often felt as a turbulent roller coaster ride that will eventually bring the spacious freedom of calm serenity and grace-filled maturity. The modern world of instant fixes, instant sex, instant shopping, instant food and instant gratification thinks that menopause suddenly begins and ends when a woman experiences her last menstruation. For this “fast fix” world is not aligned with the inherent sensitivity of the female psyche and the natural flow of female transformation.

    The menopausal womb is relentless in its desire to release the past, as it brings residual tensions and long-buried emotions to the light for healing. Many women experience the dissolution of suppressed cellular memories and the healing imagery of graphic vivid dreams as past trauma is released during this phase. These suppressed memories are often deeply sexual, intensely sensual, painfully raw and intimately real. And as they dissolve, they create a vast new space in her psyche for enhanced creativity, vibrant passion and deeper loving. The impersonal wisdom of the Crone does not wish to journey with the past. Her purpose now is to purge and purify, to cleanse and renew, to strengthen and empower, releasing all that will not serve the harmonious containment of her new life. Emotional disharmony frequently erupts as the menopausal woman prepares for her new phase of peaceful detachment and deepening wisdom.

    She may experience hormonal disturbances, lack of interest in lovemaking, disruptive separation from people and places and situations that once fulfilled her and filled her life with joy. She may find that she is no longer attracted to particular foods, flavours, clothing, activities or work that once enlivened her and gave her a sense of security and comfort. This powerful phase of female life is for releasing cluttered possessions, unreal dreams and impossible ideals. It is for relinquishing past behavioural patterns, disempowering lovers and dysfunctional relationships that are not aligned with the wise ways of the Crone. As the powerful weaver of wisdom, she cannot integrate these into her rich tapestry of new beginnings, her colourful fabric of life, if she denies her female truth.

    Copyright ~ Roslyne Sophia Breillat ©... Not to be copied without written permission from the author...



    Sophia (Roslyne Sophia Breillat) is a wise woman who lives, writes, and paints from the heart. Her prolific articles and paintings embrace the wisdom and grace of the female essence and the beauty of the Earth. She is acknowledged as a powerful and courageous writer whose creative work features in many international websites and magazines and her website is an abundant offering of female wisdom that nurtures and inspires. Sophia is the author of two books, WOMB OF WISDOM, THE SACRED JOURNEY OF MENOPAUSE and HEART OF THE EARTH, NURTURING THE SACRED FEMININE. Both of these books can be ordered directly from sophia@wildheartwisdom.com

    Email: sophia@wildheartwisdom.com
    Website: www.wildheartwisdom.com
     

    There are two courses by Sophia at the Wise Woman School:


    ~ Being Woman ~ (detailed description of Being Woman online course)


    This six week online course provides a sacred and nurturing space where woman can learn to surrender more deeply to the natural receptivity of the female psyche. "...so blessed to have had gentle words of encouragement and support from you through the "Being Woman" course at W.W.U.... You have inspired me to continue my quest... Thanks so much!"

    ~ Dawning of Wisdom ~ (detailed description of Dawning of Wisdom online course)

    Throughout this series of lessons she will learn to trust the innate flow of her intuitive nature and to listen more intimately to the wellspring of her inner source. And we will explore together how to live more fully as the embodiment of the feminine essence within the structures of a masculine civilisation.

    "I LOVE your class, it is beautiful and thought provoking and well done... Thank you Sophia for your role as wisdom keeper, confidante and mentor."

  • Tuesday, February 16, 2021 3:27 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Your Intuitive Dreams... Easy Steps to the Creation of a Successful Life
    by sHEALy (Sherry Healy)    




    To Develop and Sustain a Healthy Relationship

    1. Individuals working to create and maintain a healthy relationship should discuss and define their mutual goals. Identifying and maintaining mutual goals creates friendship and interest.

    2. Discussing and agreeing upon priority is essential to a strong relationship. Both members of the relationship will want to agree upon the prioritization of their relationship. While all relationships are not at the place in time where they must be prioritized as first within ones daily life, it is beneficial to agree upon the amount of importance that will be placed upon the relationship.

    3. Realize that all relationships are in the process of constant change. At time, ones relationship will necessitate more focus and time than others times. Be flexible to this occurrence will alleviate much stress with the relationship.

    4. Allowing a relationship to be fun will enhance the longevity of the relationship. Too often individuals forget that fun is a main ingredient in all aspects of life.

    To Develop and Sustain Career Success

    1. To achieve and sustain success within ones career it is first necessary to decide on an individual basis what one expects in the realm of success.

    2. Once and individual has defined success as expected in the career world, it is time to create a short list of goals. Mentally establishing goals allows one to clearly recognize a means to achieving that which is wanted.

    3. Expect set backs. The most successful of individuals continue to strive through and after set backs, while less successful individuals often STOP when they are faced with a set back.

    4. Allowing a career to be fun will enhance the longevity of that career. Too often individuals forget that fun is a main ingredient in all aspects of life.

    To Develop and Sustain Emotional Health


    1. When an individual is emotionally healthy, a natural desire to have fun while being creative exists. Practicing a hobby that may manifest within the field of work, arts or physical activities develops naturally.

    2. Spending time with a variety of individuals allows one to maintain a well adjusted life outlook. While humans are similar in many ways, there are mixtures of life methods. Familiarity of diverse life methods allows one to experiment within healthy emotional life styles.

    3. Emotions are nurtured through quiet contemplation. Allowing time to “go within” and experience ones intrinsic thoughts and spiritual needs freshens and relaxes the mind. Spend time in meditation. Read, pray, write or spend time listening instrumental music.

    4. Share, with a trusted friend, intimate thoughts. Never allow secrets to fester within. Speaking the most intimate thoughts, secrets and desires allows the mind to purge and overcome anxiety.

  • Saturday, February 13, 2021 1:36 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    No Spring without Winter!
    by Anne-Marie Fryer



    We just finished harvesting the fall vegetables from the garden beds. It is not long ago everything was growing vigorously. What has happened to the life of the garden? Where did all the life forces (or may I say fairies) go? The drawing in of life forces, begins in fall, continues through the beginning of winter and is completed as solstice approaches. These forces condense and stay active below the soil while on top of ground everything seems lifeless and asleep. In winter the sun is above the horizon for the shortest time, but the moon rises higher, staying in the night sky for many more hours than in the summer. In our garden seeds will soon cuddle cozily, under a blanket of snow, waiting for spring to arrive. We snuggle closer to the hearth as winter guides us into a quiet, inward mood of solitude and contemplation.

    Springtime is the season of new begins. As the sun climbs higher in the sky we sense the earth exhaling anew ascending currents of life forces. We experience deeply the outward upward growth and opening feeling of renewal as a contrast to the withdrawing of life forces in winter. Through the interplay of the sun and the earth, nature’s power of growth intensifies and millions of tons of leaves and grasses are brought forth within weeks. The new life and vitality of spring fill us with jubilation and hope.

    In summer the earth is breathing out its life forces completely. The sun is at its highest, bathing our world in warmth and light. The air feels full and expanded. The growth processes, begun in the spring, are now at their peak, ripening and maturing. The gardens and fields yield a cornucopia of fresh fruits and vegetables. This magical moods of summer penetrate us with enthusiasm and warmth while we dream the ‘Midsummer’s Dreams.’

    With autumn approaching the days mellow. We experience the sun’s weakening influence on earth and the softening of the light. As the sun withdraws from the hemisphere the earth mother inhales with certainty the life forces back into her womb. Temperatures fall and growth processes slow down. Leaves fall from their branches and seeds drop to the ground. We bring the harvest to the root cellar and put the garden to rest. As winter draws nearer our thinking crystallizes, courage builds up and our sense of inner light strengthens.

    During these coming winter month try to express the moods of each season through writing, drawing, painting, music, sculpturing or poetry. These delicious baked cinnamon apples will surely set the mood for the winter mood.

    Baked Cinnamon Apples

    Cinnamon and apples go well together in this warming and relaxing dessert, suited for fall. Use a variety of apples and discover how they differ in sweetness and crunch.

    3 tablespoons walnuts
    4 apples
    1 tablespoon light miso
    2 tablespoons freshly ground peanut butter (optional)
    2 tablespoons water
    1 tablespoon cinnamon

    Soak the walnuts in lightly salted water 4-6 hours. Drain and chop them fine.

    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

    Core the apples with an apple corer or spoon. Make sure not to cut all the way through the apple.

    In a small bowl mix the miso and peanut butter. Add water, cinnamon and chopped walnuts.

    Spoon 1 tablespoon of the filling into each apple.

    Place the apples in a baking dish. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until soft.



     
    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.




    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     
    ~Cooking for the Love of Children~
    ( detailed description of online distance learning course )

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.



    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


  • Tuesday, February 02, 2021 1:40 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Tools for the Cold and Flu Season

    By Linda Conroy



    The cold and flu season is in full swing. Before deciding what to do,  It is helpful to understand that when we have a cold and/or the flu we are dealing with respiratory viruses.  In order to avoid these common ailments I find that prevention is the best defense. I am not inclined to get the flu shot and so I work to nourish myself, to build and strengthen my natural immunity. As the saying goes an ounce of prevention can go a long way, even if you do get sick. 


    A good rule of thumb during cold and flu season is to minimize contact with large groups of people. While not always possible, minimizing contact is ideal. We all know that kids in schools pass viruses readily and often. 


    It also is important to eat whole unprocessed food. Long cooked bone broths are very helpful and of course it is important to get plenty of rest. To learn about bone broths you can visit our blog post on the topic at this link.  During the winter months, it is important to get more sleep than usual. Really take an example from the hibernating bears, 10 hours really is not to much. And naps, well take an example from cats and dogs, they are master at napping.


    Drinking nourishing herbal infusions: Mullein (Verbascum Thapsus), Nettle (Urtica dioca), Oats (Avena sativa), Red Clover (Trifolium pretense) and Roseship (Rosa sp) is a powerful way to keep your body healthy and strong. To find out how to prepare nourishing herbal infusions click here.


    In addition to keeping your system strong, you can prophylactically or preventatively ingest Elderberry (Sambucus sp) tincture, tea or syrup. This is a powerful antiviral herb that can be ingested on a daily basis for long periods of time. If you are not able to make your own, preparations of this herb are becoming increasingly easy to find.


    At the first sign of a cold or flu I like to ingest Echinacea ( to learn more about Echinacea sp (click here) and/or Elderberry (Sambucus sp). These two herbs can be ingested as a tea, tincture or syrup. They are very effective at warding or minimizing the duration of a cold or flu.  I like to take large quantities of these herbs. In tincture or syrup form I take 1 tsp every 2 hours for the first day or two of the illness. If ingesting these herbs in tea form taking a cup or two every couple of hours. You really cannot ingest too much of these herbs. There are herbs that you want to be more cautious around, but these are safe and effective.


    For relieving symptoms once they are established the following herbs can be helpful:



    Elecampane (Inula helenium) This is a European herb in the Asteracea family. This plant is easy to grow and it is beautiful in the back of the herb garden. The root is the part of the plant used for medicine. I typically take this in a syrup or tincture form. Medicinally, Elecampane is a wonderful expectorant. I find it to be a very effective lung tonic as well as a treatment herb for relieving congestion during the cold and flu season. This is the main reason I like to have it available in my winter medicine cabinet. To learn more about this plant visit our post here.


    St Johnswort (Hypericum perforaturm) While many think of this herb as a nervine or one that can ease mild depression, when I think of this plant I typically think antiviral. This plant, relieves pain, inhibits cancer growth, relieves/prevents muscle aches, is antiseptic, anitmicrobal, antiviral, heals burns, cold sores, herpes and shingles, relives sore muscles, bones, heals nerves, reduces inflammation and eases sciatica pain. I typically ingest this in tincture form, 1 tsp every two hours for acute situations. I decrease the dose as the symptoms decrease.


    Yarrow (Achilia millifolium) This plant is a common weed, in the Astercaea family. This plant is another under-utilized viral fighting plant. Not only does it fight viruses, it also relieves pain, reduces inflammation, stops bleeding and is a great insect repellent. Yarrow tea is wonderful and/or for immediate relief the tincture can also be useful.

    Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) This plant is a member of the mint family. It grows easily and readily in any garden. Lemon Balm is also viral fighting and is specific for fighting herpes infections, particularly during acute phases then pain is present. It can be ingested as well as applied topically to fight viruses, to soothe pain and irritation and to add a cooling affect both internally externally. A tincture, tea, oil or salve can be made. To  learn a little more about Lemon Balm click here.


    There are many other herbs that can be enlisted to support our bodies during the cold and flu season. The above plants are ones that I have had good results with and find are simple and safe to use.


    I hope you are all feeling well and if you are in areas where the arctic blast has brought very cold temperature that you are staying warm!


    Many Green Blessings,
    Linda

     




     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Thursday, January 28, 2021 2:50 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Leo Full Moon Ritual, Astrology, Meditation, Video & Soul Reading

    by Kathy Crabbe


    Dearest Moon Muser,

    I had a wonderful time creating this Full Moon Video filled with astrology tips, Leo Goddesses, a Channeled Butterfly Meditation, herbal kitty wisdom to warm your soul plus a chance to pick a card for a soul reading and have your questions answered.  The oracle cards are all below - enjoy!



    Leo Goddesses (Zodiac Goddess Power Deck by Kathy Crabbe)


    Leo Meditation ~ The Gold Within

    Feel the sadness of earth’s cry,
    let your body touch the sky,
    guide by light, your soul’s fire,
    spark to lead ever higher.

    Leo Affirmations

        I am special and loved

        My heart is open

        I am awake and in tune with my spiritual self

        My inner child is alive and well

        I am a creative being bursting with joy

        I am one with the Sun

        I am generous and loving

    Zodiac Goddess Power Deck





    Cat Herbal: Juniper (from my upcoming deck coming out 2021)



    “Juniper is a protective herb of the Sun. It is associated with the base chakra, where the Kundalini, or serpent power, lies dormant. Juniper is useful for those who are blocked on the physical plane, generally earth types. It is also used for those who are looking for a more spiritual way of life, who want to embrace fire. Juniper allows a person to be more detached emotionally and to move on from obsessions or resentments, from anger and violence. Being fiery, juniper can also help to ‘dry out’ water types, who become lost in a sea of emotion and are unable to act or initiate. Fire provides focus and direction. It energizes the will and gives courage, something that watery types sometimes lack. You can work with Juniper incense or by burning juniper berries on charcoal at the new and full moons. As you work with it, allow yourself to become inspired and encouraged by your own spiritual fire.” ~ (Excerpted from Astrological Herbal for Women by Elisabeth Brooke.)


    Cat Herbal Deck





    Leo Full Moon Soul Reading + Pick-A-Card


    Card 1: Carolee (Lefty Oracle Deck)

    Mantra: My heart is open.
    Affirmation: I am all heart in tune with the universal flow.
    Element: Water

    Song
     Heart to heart with open arms
     I share
     myself with you.
     
     I am an open book, comfortably
     intimate and revealing.
     
     I expect nothing in return.
     Just being with you here and now is all I ask.
     
     Believe in me.
     I trust you with my heart.
     
     If this card appears in a reading get ready for the sun to shine upon you and all your endeavours. You have accomplished a lot in a short time and your heart is full and spilling over. Share this good feeling with others just by being in their presence. Your good vibes will raise the energy level of all you touch.

    In my own life I try to share my own heartfelt, positive energy through my art. If it lights me up inside I can only hope it will do the same for others.

    Lefty Oracle Deck


    Card 2: Seal (Elfin Ally Oracle Deck)


    Keyword: Kindness
     Meaning: A friend or lover awaits your call.
     Reversed: You are longing for something better instead of being fully present.

    Affirmation: I am Queen-of-the-Sea
     Astrology: Jupiter
     Element: Fire, Water,

    Medicine: Your playful magick entices us to claim our inner Queen, sea-bent on journeying into the Deep.

    Lore: A secret passage to the sea adored by silky Seal, was her True North, encompassing her heart and leading her Home, always Home from whence she got her start.

    You entice me to play and dive and learn about the cycles of the Sea and then forget I’m an elf and become one with the sea, a mermaid at heart.

    Elfin Ally Oracle Deck






    Divine Feminine eClass starts February 11


    Join me for a 4 week experience where we'll come together beginning at the New Moon in Aquarius for a mystical, magickal experience. Each week you'll receive creative, inspirational moon-guided lessons and videos by email to help you resonate with Mama Moon, develop your intuition and get creative. We'll also meet by phone to share a guided meditation or two and in a private online group. You’ll also receive a personalized Moon Chart to help you tune in astrologically to what's going on that moonth.

    Learn more






    Kathy Crabbe has been an artist forever and a soul reader since awakening her intuitive gifts at age forty after five years painting with her non dominant left hand. This awoke her intuition in a big way. In 2008 she created a Lefty Oracle deck and started giving intuitive soul readings that have touched many lives in profound and playful ways. Kathy lives in sunny Southern California with her pet muses and architect husband in an adobe home they built themselves.

    Kathy’s art and writing has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazines and books including the San Diego Women’s History Museum, We’Moon Datebook, and Sawdust Art Festival in Laguna Beach to name a few. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and ecourses and maintains a regularly updated blog, etsy store and portfolio site. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992. Kathy has been an educator and mentor at Laguna Outreach Community Artists, Mt. San Jacinto College, Wise Woman University, Inspire San Diego Studio, HGTV, Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show as well as teaching her own classes: “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul”, and New Moon Circles. She is a founding member of the Temecula Artist’s Circle, the Temecula Writer’s Café and the Riverside Art Museum’s Printmaker’s Network. Metaphysically speaking, Kathy has studied with Francesca De Grandis (Third Road Celtic Faerie Shamanism), Adam Higgs (psychic mediumship), Om, devotee of Sri Chinmoy (meditation), Atma Khalsa (yoga), Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive), Joyce Fournier, RN (Therapeutic Touch), Steven Forrest & Jeffrey Wolf Green (astrology) and she received certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy.
    Learn more here.


    Kathy’s 4 week eClass “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul” is once again being offered at Wise Woman School so get ready to Moon Collage your heart out starting one week prior to the New Moon each month…more details here: eClass.


  • Monday, January 18, 2021 3:20 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Resolutions Beyond New Year

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt




    A diet of wholesome, locally grown seasonal foods lays a foundation for clear, open and living thinking, a healthy inner life of feeling, and a strong will to fulfill our life’s tasks and purposes. A strong, flexible body with a healthy inner life is the chalice and instrument for true listening to the song of the world, and receiving insight into soul/spirit wisdom.

    If we want to answer the question of what we should eat and which foods are good for us, we each have to enter into this chalice and listen deeply to our own true knowing.  We alone know the answers to the questions. We can learn to cultivate this inner knowing.  It can be sensed in a real bodily way. If we pause for a minute and in silence connect with our inner being, we can clearly feel whether we are weighted down in our body and mind, or too nervous and skittish. With practice we will be able to sense what is making us feel heavy or flighty and what dietary and life style changes can help change this feeling. Have you noticed if you feel different after eating for example root vegetables as opposed to fruits? Cut up a couple of carrots and cook them in a little water for 10-15 minutes. Then cut similar size pieces of apples and cook them the same way. Eat one dish several hours after the other. Try the experiment over a couple of days and observe any changes in thinking, emotions or physical being. Every food we eat effects us. Our being is changed by the food we eat.

    When we enter into this inner knowing, which is more in the realm of the heart than in the mind, we take part in the wisdom of the world. We experience how our body and inner being belong to the activities of the earth and cosmos. As we attend to these activities with genuine awareness, we come to know life and the universal wisdom in all of creation. Gratitude, wonder and awe open us to a place of receptivity to the world and its processes and rhythms. Creating beautiful, nourishing meals that resonate with the wisdom and harmony in nature is like living our lives as an open unfolding work of art.

    We can approach the year as an archetypal imagination of becoming; each season moving to the next and returning to where it started. Cooking with nature and her rhythms invites a spiraling cyclic path and the possibility to meet each time of year again and again in a new way. It encourages an inner development of mobility and flexibility and deepens understanding and enriches life year after year. We are given an opportunity to grow and learn and the freedom to support health and harmony in the world. It is an awesome experience and it is a great responsibility.

    My book, Cooking for the Love of the World, Awakening to our Spirituality Through Cooking, encourages everyone to develop a new and fresh relationship with the world through the art of cooking.  In addition it contains many simple, and elegant seasonal recipes as well as practices and explorations. These exercises engage our will, enliven our imagination and create heart-felt understanding of the natural world we are part of. Realities come about through what lives. When these explorations are accompanied by true feelings, then the content of the book will no longer remain only intellectual understanding or just a book of recipes. Instead it will awaken true knowledge of ourselves and the world without which we cannot bring about real change in our life. We all can come to experience an inner radiance, which will permeate the depth of our being and everyone and everything around us.

    Hot Spiced Glogg

    Hot-spiced winter drinks are common in many countries. They are often made with red wine and strong liquor. Red berry juices made with blueberries or elderberries are a healthier alternative. Serve in small glasses.

    1/2 cup almonds
    2 cups water
    1 quart red wine or 1 quart dark berry juice
    1/2 tablespoon whole cloves
    3-4 whole cinnamon sticks
    1/2 cup raisins
    Sweeten with honey, or maple syrup if necessary
    1 orange cut in slices

    Boil 2 cups water and pour over the almonds. Let sit for 10 minutes. Slip peels off the almonds and cut in thin diagonals.
    Meanwhile slowly heat the juice or wine in a big pot with cinnamon sticks, cloves and raisins. Add almonds, cover with a lid and let simmer for 20 minutes.
    Serve in small glasses or mugs with a spoon. Garnish with orange slices.

    Happy New Year!


     
    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.




    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     
    ~Cooking for the Love of Children~
    ( detailed description of online distance learning course )

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.



    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


  • Tuesday, January 12, 2021 7:36 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    New Moon in Capricorn with Cat Herbal: Chickweed

    by Kathy Crabbe





    Cat Herbal for the New Moon: Chickweed
    (Cat Herbal Oracle Deck Coming Soon!)


    Chickweed can help soften brittle people and break down boundaries. It’s also used in love spells to attract love and maintain a relationship. Also, to celebrate entering Cronehood and the keeping of ancient wisdom, unraveling the darker secrets of life.

    Planet: Moon
    Element: Water

    Healing: Stellaria media aka ‘little star’ can help cool one down, nourish and heal wounds, open eyes and help with dieting and joint lubrication.


    Chickweed Original & Prints Now Available!






    https://www.kathycrabbe.com/cat-herbal-prints/chickweed-print




    Kathy Crabbe has been an artist forever and a soul reader since awakening her intuitive gifts at age forty after five years painting with her non dominant left hand. This awoke her intuition in a big way. In 2008 she created a Lefty Oracle deck and started giving intuitive soul readings that have touched many lives in profound and playful ways. Kathy lives in sunny Southern California with her pet muses and architect husband in an adobe home they built themselves.

    Kathy’s art and writing has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazines and books including the San Diego Women’s History Museum, We’Moon Datebook, and Sawdust Art Festival in Laguna Beach to name a few. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and ecourses and maintains a regularly updated blog, etsy store and portfolio site. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992. Kathy has been an educator and mentor at Laguna Outreach Community Artists, Mt. San Jacinto College, Wise Woman University, Inspire San Diego Studio, HGTV, Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show as well as teaching her own classes: “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul”, and New Moon Circles. She is a founding member of the Temecula Artist’s Circle, the Temecula Writer’s Café and the Riverside Art Museum’s Printmaker’s Network. Metaphysically speaking, Kathy has studied with Francesca De Grandis (Third Road Celtic Faerie Shamanism), Adam Higgs (psychic mediumship), Om, devotee of Sri Chinmoy (meditation), Atma Khalsa (yoga), Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive), Joyce Fournier, RN (Therapeutic Touch), Steven Forrest & Jeffrey Wolf Green (astrology) and she received certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy.
    Learn more here.


    Kathy’s 4 week eClass “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul” is once again being offered at Wise Woman School so get ready to Moon Collage your heart out starting one week prior to the New Moon each month…more details here: eClass.


  • Thursday, January 07, 2021 7:11 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    She Is
    Written & illustrated by Roslyne Sophia Breillat




       Woman awakening... Woman reawakening... Woman remembering... Woman re-aligning... Woman welcoming... Woman being...

      She is stirring... She is awakening from her amnesia, her deep sleep of forgetfulness, remembering her true purpose, true nature...

       Who is this woman?... She is the spirit, essence, elixir, nectar of the flower blooming within the female psyche, the feminine was once revered upon this Earth... She is She... Slowly, silently, sensuously, She begins to open her deepest seeing of what is real, what is true, of who she is...

       Woman calling... She calls silently from deep within the womb of the Earth, of the Universe, of Life... She calls silently from deep within every woman’s womb... She calls loudly, wildly, many Aeons of repression tearing her false persona asunder, like a deep crevice in the land, revealing the fathomless abyss of her discontent and her inability to live another moment upon this Earth as patriarchy’s victim, expected to live as a man, projecting, striving, chasing, pursuing, ascending the corporate ladder, going to war, leaving her babies with strangers while she jaggedly believes she must go “out there” and succeed... And deep within the darkness of midnight, within the witching hours of dawn, She calls, raw, untamed, a caged wild creature, roaring, screaming, howling, like her wolf sisters deep in the forest, deep in the wild... And within the hazy spiraling whirlwind of her forgetting, She suddenly realises she has been living a dream, a lie, for She has not really forgotten at all...

       Woman weeps... She weeps, silent woman tears, gentled rivulets slowly trickling upon her cheeks, tears flowing, growing into wisdom, beauty, integrity, power, nurtured by the glorious soul-filled, love-filled, life-filled, grace-filled purpose of her re-awakening... She weeps for the rape of her body and the rape of her sister’s bodies, She weeps for the rape of abortions, for birth rape, menopausal rape, the rape of the Earth... She weeps, not the tears of a victimised child, but the purifying tears of woman reawakening... She weeps, streaming tears of joy, iridescent tears of laughter, sparkling, love-filled tears of compassionate recognition of her true purpose, essence, being... 

       Woman sobs... She sobs, deep heart-wrenching, gut-wrenching sobbing, purging past lovers, relationships, sorrows, hurts, betrayals, wounds, inflicted upon the female psyche by men who could not see, reach or love her, seeing her as a sex object instead of a sacred Goddess... Woman sobs, grieving for myriad ways She has betrayed her true nature, repenting how She has followed, copied, attempted to be masculine, instead of simply being gracious feminine wisdom... She grieves for her beloved Earth Mother’s polluted waters, plundered forests, homeless refugees, war-ravaged lands, starving children, from an inner place of deep womb longing, deep womb belonging...

       Woman is purging... She is shedding false layers, becoming naked, unafraid... She is purging her false identity of “belonging” to a culture that does not support, nurture or respect the feminine... She is purging grief, shame, blame... She is opening, deepening, releasing inherited masculine intellectual knowing... She is slowing into the natural pace and space of her inherent feminine rhythm... She is timeless, letting go of masculine time...

      Woman is reconnecting... She is graciously dissolving into, instead of incessantly going outward... She surrenders instead of forces, tenderly, intimately welcoming her cyclic Moon essence’s powerful wisdom, lunar tidal femaleness, natural ebbing and flowing of her menstrual cycle, mothering cycle, menopausal cycle... And beneath her sobbing, weeping, roaring, She is silence, stillness, peace, love, grace... She weaves ancient tapestries’ sacred threads into presence, falling, arising, like the Moon in the sky, the shore’s tidal waters, the subtle rhythm of pulse, heart, womb... She faces her fear, She rides wild waves of strength, passion, courage...

       Woman is Earth Spirit... Being with Mother Nature’s grace-filled silence, merging her womb essence with the Earth’s womb essence, is more important than being “busy”, for the Earth is her only true belonging... She no longer pretends... She no longer forgets... For She remembers, for She reawakens... For She is...



    Sophia (Roslyne Sophia Breillat) was a wise woman who lived, wrote, and painted from the heart. Her prolific articles and paintings embrace the wisdom and grace of the female essence and the beauty of the Earth. She is acknowledged as a powerful and courageous writer whose creative work features in many international websites and magazines and her website is an abundant offering of female wisdom that nurtures and inspires. Sophia is the author of two books, WOMB OF WISDOM, THE SACRED JOURNEY OF MENOPAUSE and HEART OF THE EARTH, NURTURING THE SACRED FEMININE.

    Sophias course is available at the Wise Woman School:

    ~ Being Woman ~ (detailed description of Being Woman online course)


    This six week online course provides a sacred and nurturing space where woman can learn to surrender more deeply to the natural receptivity of the female psyche. "...so blessed to have had gentle words of encouragement and support from you through the "Being Woman" course at W.W.S.... You have inspired me to continue my quest... Thanks so much!"

    "I LOVE your class, it is beautiful and thought provoking and well done... Thank you Sophia for your role as wisdom keeper, confidante and mentor."

  • Wednesday, December 23, 2020 7:50 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

     

     

    I like to call our Urban Permaculture Farm, the Herbal Homestead. I call it this, because for me it all started with herbs. My first herb teachers were wise woman herbalists. They encouraged me to focus on the herbs growing right outside of my doorstep and this has remained as a pivotal place for me to return over and over again.

    A lot happens at our homestead. We grow food and medicine, we wild forage from green spaces in our community as well as neighbors yards. We tend the critters in our space, we feed ourselves, as well as our family and friends. We strive to expand our understanding of life and to weave ourselves into our surroundings.

    This column will highlight some of the things that happen here at The Herbal Homestead. It is an invitation to spend time with me through stories of daily life. 



    Winter Nourishment: Soup Stocks and Broths

    This morning I awoke and it was cold. We heat our home with a wood furnace, so sleeping 8 hours means that you wake up to a chilly house. My wool comforter made by the local woolen mill, keeps me very warm at night, yet when I emerge from under the covers I have two goals.

    1. To reignite the wood stove

         2. To make something warm to drink.


    I often make a cup of tea, but some mornings only a cup of broth will do.  I was inspired a couple of years ago when I attended a Weston A. Price Foundation Conference to begin incorporating broth into my breakfast routine. At the conference they served broth for breakfast. It was winter and I will never forget how satisfying that morning cup of broth was. I realized that by stereotyping broth as an afternoon or evening food, I was missing out on a very special morning opportunity. Of course I still incorporate broth into my winter stews and soups, but I now have expanded my horizons and added it to our homestead breakfast list!


    Below are a few of my favorite recipes for broth. Broth can be made and frozen for future use.

     

    How to Make Soup Stock: 3 Easy Broth Recipes

    Soup stocks are incredibly healthy, nutrient dense and serve as a quintessential comfort food on a cold day. Soup stock has a long history as a nourishing and healing food. While the village herbalist has always known the healing power of soup stock and chicken soup in particular, it took until the year 2000 for CNN headlines to read, “Chicken soup is medicine, U.S. scientists confirm.” Glad they caught up.


    There is no doubt that homemade soup and soup stock is healthy, tastes good and is easy to make.  The following are recipes that serve as guidelines. I say guidelines, as I am a scratch cook, which means that I add what I have. I love to add new herbs, spices, vegetables and animals parts. A couple of years ago I began adding egg shells. It means the stock that I make is always new and interesting. I often add herbs and spices not only for flavor, but to increase the nutrient density of the stock.

     

    Vegetable Stock


    Place the chopped vegetables, herbs, and spices into a crock pot or stockpot. I like a crockpot, as it can be left unattended for long periods of time. Add enough cold water to cover the vegetables. Simmer for approximately 24 hours. Many people make vegetable stock from scraps such as peels and stems. If you use vegetable scraps to make your stock, you will need to strain them from the stock and discard them when finished. And to note, when you boil vegetables for a meal, a lot of their flavor and nutrients leach out into the water.


    The next time you boil vegetables, save the water and add it to your vegetable stock or next batch of soup. Of course being the seaweed lover that I am, I sometimes thicken and enhance the consistency of a vegetable broth by adding a red seaweed ie dulse, turkish towel and/or irish moss. Red seaweed contains carrageenan, which adds viscosity or thickness to the broth and is nutritious. Carrageenan is particularly supportive to the digestive system.    

     

    Chicken or Turkey Stock

    Place chicken or turkey bones, spare meat, vegetable scraps, herbs and spices into a stockpot or slow cooker. If you have access to the feet of the animal you will want to add them, as this will add gelatin to the broth for a thick, rich, highly nutritious broth. Add enough cold water to cover the vegetables and bones. Simmer for 24 hours. Foam will form on the surface of the stock as it simmers. Use a spoon, or ladle, to skim it off. Strain the bones and vegetable scraps from the stock and discard them.

     

    Beef Stock


    Begin by baking the beef soup bones in the oven at 450 degrees for half an hour. If you have access to oxtail bones you will want to add them, as this will add gelatin. As with chicken or turkey broth, the gelatin will create a thick nutritious broth.  Put the beef bones, spare meat, vegetable scraps, herbs and spices into a stockpot. Add enough cold water to cover the vegetables and bones. Simmer for approximately 24 hours. Foam will form on the surface of the beef stock as it simmers. Use a spoon, or ladle, to skim it off. Strain the bones and vegetable scraps from the stock and discard them.

     

    *For bone broths you will want to place your stock in the refrigerator for 8 hours in order to separate the fat and for the broth to gel. The best broth will be quite gelatinous.


    *Adding herbs to any of these broths will also increase their nutrient density. I often add seaweed, burdock, astragalus, mushrooms, lovage, alfalfa, nettle and whatever else happens to be near by. There is no limit to what you can add to your stocks! Have fun! Seaweed added to stock contributes much needed trace minerals.


    Gelatin extracted from bones is a nutritious source of protein as well as collagen, calcium, minerals and the amino acids proline and glycine.


    Stock made from poultry or other bones increases endurance and strengthens the immune system and veins, arteries, muscles, tendons, skin and bones. It also soothes and heals the gastro-intestinal tract and is thus a potent medicine for people suffering from food sensitivities and digestive or bowel problems. All stock provides an easily assimilable form of vitamins and minerals.

     

    Using Your Stock


    You can use the stock immediately as a base for soup, or you can freeze it and begin making your soup on another day. If you freeze the soup stock, leave a bit of space in the top of the container for expansion. It is a good idea to freeze the stock into the portion size that works best for you. A single cup of stock can be warmed on a cold day for an instant meal for breakfast, lunch or dinner.


    Tossing in leftover meat and vegetables from the refrigerator creates a wonderful meal. Adding cream, pureed vegetables, starch, or flour can thicken soup stock. I also cook rice and other grains in soup stock for added nutrition and flavor. This is a very creative process and a great way to enjoy leftovers in a new and refreshing form.


    May the stock be with you during these cold winter days.



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.
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