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  • Friday, January 09, 2015 3:20 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Evening Yoga: Ardha Matsyendrasana

    Restorative twisting pose that assist the abdominal organs to digest, absorb, and eliminate holiday meals. Lengthens the spine.





    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl
    http://www.pacific-elements.com/
  • Friday, December 19, 2014 3:46 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Into the Dark: Winter Solstice & New Moon in Capricorn
    by Kathy Crabbe



    Dear Creative Soul,


    When I sat down in my shamanic New Moon Circle to honour and celebrate the upcoming Winter Solstice and New Moon in Capricorn this is what I channeled:


    Oh Winter, Cailleach, Ancient Crone, Dark Night, I listen to your Silence and I hear the cauldron bubble and the owl hoot. It’s time now to go within, to the dark, dark place where death and ice dance our name. Beneath the earth we enter Her barrow, Her cave at sunrise, Solstice morn. First light we see touches our third eye through this opening: the Light…the Light…she does return and within her, Hope and Dreams and Seeds are planted. It is the New Moon in Capricorn so let us plant these seeds, these dreams and tend Her garden for we are called…YOU are called…the wheel turns and we reply:


    I AM Goddess
    I AM God
    I AM the Light
    I AM the Dark
    I AM holding Circle
    Blessed Be


    Demon by Kathy Crabbe (Creative Soul 'Lefty' Oracle Card)

    Creative Soul Card for the New Moon & Winter Solstice: Demon


    Affirmation: Into the dark you go: be guided, be brave, let go.


    The lore is ancient when She was venerated and He was equal to the task. Blessed Be the Balance is shifting now ~ can you feel it? Describe. Take a moment of silence, meditation, contemplation then journal and discuss.


    My Winter Solstice Vision
    As for me: I feel at peace; calm, quiet, centered.  The darkness is velvety. I am surrounded by my guides, totems and star beings. I lie down and they bless me as my third eye tingles. The Hag, the Cailleach and I peer into her cauldron and I get in ~ to die and be reborn. I wait for the perfect moment; the moment of Solstice, to be born as light returns. I scream then I sleep; a new day has come.


    Intention Setting for the New Moon
    Let go into darkness and as you are re-born and the Sun returns, it’s time now to set your intentions for the moonth ahead. Don’t forget to journal too!


    Capricorn New Moon Circle Altar Suggestions from my Goddess Zodiac Playbook

    • Color: black, brown, dark grey, slate blue
    • Gemstone: jet, onyx
    • Plant/Tree: amaranthus, birch, elm, ivy, pine, poplar, willow
    • Herb/Spice: comfrey, hemlock, hemp, henbane
    • Food: barley, beet, malt, meat, potato, spinach, starchy foods
    • Animal Spirit: goat (with a fish tail), snow goose
    • Tarot Card: devil
    • Goddess: all crones, Anatu, Cailleach, Dam-Kina, Kuan Yin, Tiamat






    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, author and educator who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, creative soul classes, intuitive readings and online resources infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy's work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazine and books
    including the San Diego Women’s History Museum and the We’Moon Datebook. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and e-courses and maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and etsy shop.
     
    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen's University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992.
     
    Kathy has been an educator and mentor for Laguna Outreach Community Artists, the Sawdust Art Festival, HGTV, Wise Woman University, and Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show. Currently she is teaching her Creative Soul Class at Yoga for Life Temecula, Inspire San Diego and Mt. San Jacinto College.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.


    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell's Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Currently Kathy is studying Celtic Faerie Shamanism with Francesca De Grandis, author of
    Be A Goddess. Learn more here.

  • Friday, December 12, 2014 2:52 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Cultured Milk for Health, Nourishment and Fun!

    By Linda Conroy

    www.moonwiseherbs.com

    www.midwestwomensherbal.com

    Our kitchen is a very busy place. We make the majority of our food from scratch and cultured milk products are a big part of our kitchen rituals. Kefir, yogurt, piima, tara, viili, these are all varieties of cultured milk that we enjoy.

    Ingesting and creating these at home is one of the ways that we support our digestive health. By offering our body the probiotics that are abundant in cultured food products we increase our ability to digest and assimilate food. Digestion is at the heart of immune health and supporting the immune system helps our entire system. Not only do these fabulous tasting beverages support immune health, but we can turn them into soft spreadable cheese and add herbs to them. When we add herbs we can increase the bioavailability of the fat soluble vitamins, A, D, E and K, thus increasing their nutrient density.

    Culturing milk and fermenting food in general is a food preservation technique first and foremost. Since the domestication of animals making cheese and culturing milk has been a common way of preserving milk. Today in the west we enjoy cheese and cultured milk from around the world, yet few people make cheese and cultured milk at home.  This time honored way of preserving food is a way to store food without refrigeration. If you have a cool place in your home, you can store the finished product outside of the refrigerator. Milk left on it’s own will eventually sour, but by adding specific bacterial cultures we create a unique product with a flavor and acidity that is pleasant and enjoyable.

    I began making cultured milk products and cheese in my kitchen close to two decades ago. And while I am lucky enough to have access to farm fresh raw milk, I am aware that not everyone has access to milk directly from the farm.  If you do have access to milk directly from the farm, definitely use that for culturing. If you do not have access to farm fresh raw milk, try to find the lowest heat pasteurized milk available in your area, avoiding milk that is ultra-pasteurized and thus highly processed. And when working with pasteurized milk it is ideal from a health perspective to ferment it. Fermenting or culturing your milk, will bring nutrients to the milk which were lost during pasteurization. The fermentation process leaves in its wake vitamins, enzymes and beneficial bacteria.

    Cultured milk is created by adding bacteria to milk. The bacteria consume the milk sugar and change some of it to lactic acid. Yogurt is a popular example of cultured milk. Another example that is increasing in popularity is Kefir.

    Kefir is similar to yogurt in that it is created by introducing a certain variety of bacteria to milk. The bacteria added to kefir create a low curd tension, which means that it is more fluid that yogurt. Kefir is typically ingested as a drink due to the consistency, whereas yogurt is often eaten with a spoon. Kefir tends to have a sour-bubbly taste and is sometimes called the champagne of cultured milk. The bacteria culture for Kefir actually contains some yeast which leaves a variety of cultured milk that has slight alcohol content.

    Below are a couple of examples of milk products you can make in your kitchen. The starter cultures can be found in natural health food stores, on the internet and/or from friends. Just ask and anyone who has a kefir culture going will eventually have too much and be glad to share it with you!


    Yogurt

    This recipe creates 1 gallon of yogurt and can be adapted to create smaller batches. This recipe can be made with goat, cow, sheep or whatever milk you have on hand.

    You will need:

    -a pot that will hold one gallon of milk
    -one-gallon glass jar or other glass container with a lid that will hold one gallon of milk.
    -1 cup plain yogurt for starter (check the content of the yogurt you purchase and be sure it contains 3 or more live active cultures).
    -glass measuring cup (holds two cups)
    -a thermometer
    -a long spoon (one that fits to the bottom of the glass jar)
    -a cooler (or other insulated location to incubate the yogurt)
    -a towel

    1.    heat milk slowly to 115 degrees
    2.    measure 1 cup of starter in the glass measuring cup
    3.    add ½-3/4 cup warm milk to the starter and mix thoroughly
    4.    pour this mixture into glass jar/container
    5.    In 2-3 cup portions add warmed milk-stirring thoroughly each time continuing until all of the milk has been added. (Stirring well assures your yogurt will be smooth)
    6.    check the temperature several times during this process
    7.    The goal is for the milk to be 110 degrees F when all the milk ahs been added. The mixture will incubate at 110 degrees. If the mixture is too hot it will kill the bacteria-if it is too cold the bacteria will not completely culture the milk. Under cultured yogurt may be stringy.
    8.    Place container wrapped in a cooler that contains 120 degree water and/or other insulated place (the oven can be used just be sure it is not turned on during the incubation period) for 24 hours.
    9.    Enjoy and store unused portions in a cool place or refrigerator.


    Kefir (pronounced: keff é-er)

    Kefir is a variety of cultured milk. It is similar to yogurt in that it is created by introducing a variety of bacteria to milk. The bacteria added to kefir create a low curd tension which means that is more fluid than yogurt. Kefir is typically ingested as a drink due to the consistency whereas yogurt is often eaten with a spoon. Kefir tends to have a sour-bubbly taste and is sometimes called the champagne of cultured milk. Its fermentation actually leaves us with a variety of cultured milk that has a very small alcohol content.

    To make kefir from the “grains” (note this is a matrix that the bacterial culture live on and is not a grain) or culture:

    Place grains in a jar
    Pour milk over the grains
    Let set at room temperature for 24-48 hours (until the curd coagulates)
    Strain grains and enjoy the remaining liquid. Place unused portions in the refrigerator.
    Either place more milk on the grains or refrigerate for later use.

    Kefir and Yogurt Cheese

    You can create these when you have excess yogurt or kefir. Both of these make wonderful cheese spreads. You can add salt and/or fresh herbs. The yogurt cheese is delicious in recipes calling for ricotta and kefir cheese is a good choice in recipes that call for sour cream. I often top my beans and rice with Kefir cheese. Yum!!

    Directions:

    ~To create these: line a large strainer with cheesecloth.
    ~Pour or scoop yogurt or kefir into the cheesecloth.
    ~Tie the corners of the cloth crossway and hang in a place where the whey can drain for 2-12 hours-the amount of time will depend on the consistency you are looking for.
    ~Once the cheese has reached the desired consistency scrape the cheese from the cloth and place in a jar.
    ~Add salt and/or herbs as desired. Store unused portions in the refrigerator for up to a week.

    (If you catch the whey you can use it to culture other foods, drink, use as a cooking liquid, feed to your pets or water your garden or house plants!!)




     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.


  • Thursday, December 04, 2014 6:30 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Cheering for Your Belly Microbiome: Go Non-GMO

    by Lisa Sarasohn


    Here's more about GMO foods, products made with Genetically Modified Organisms -- the lifeforms formerly known as "plants." My last post revealed how their weed-killer residues are qualified to kill beneficial bacteria in your gut.


    Modifying organisms genetically means that engineers are tampering with plants' DNA, tinkering with their cells' essential operating code. Commercializing life's core intelligence in this way subordinates the integrity of creation to the increase of corporate profits.


    By my lights, since it's likely to be lethal, the enterprise is insane. It's unholy, a slap in the Creator's face. Frankly, I'd love to hear how Creationists feel about genetic engineering and GMOs.


    What's the backstory?


    When Monsanto launched Roundup® in 1974, the company declared the herbicide to be safe for humans. Less toxic than aspirin. Safe as table salt.


    Safe? In 1996 the State of New York's Attorney General filed suit against Monsanto and its claim that Roundup® is "safe as table salt." Without copping to wrongdoing, the company paid a fine and agreed to stop advertising its glyphosate-containing products as "safe, non-toxic, harmless or free from risk."


    Still, stories about the safety of genetically modified (GM) edibles with attending glyphosate residues persist. GM foodstuffs are supposedly so safe that, in the United States at least, products containing these engineering marvels don't have to label themselves as such.


    Safety Engineering


    Put "safe" and "engineering" next to each other, then think of another GM, General Motors. As of August 1, 2014, General Motors had recalled 26.41 million vehicles -- about 40% of the total number of GM cars and trucks on American roads -- in order to fix defects that make them dangerous to drive.


    Typically, 10 to 20 million American vehicles are recalled each year due to safety concerns; in some years the number of recalls has surpassed 30 million.


    Oops.


    As a profession, auto engineering has been around much longer than genetic engineering. Yet look at its track record. Do we really want to feed ourselves and our children engineered food, no matter how "safe" its proponents and profit-takers declare it to be?


    R-Words


    Recall. Also Roundup®. The brand name itself is appalling. In my mind, it provokes disturbing images. Not only rounding up weeds for extinction by blanketing fields with massive doses of chemical poison. Also cowboys rounding up cattle, herding them to slaughterhouses. Gestapo rounding up Jews, herding them to concentration camps. Genetic engineering, genocide -- the words are shiveringly similar.


    How Lethal?


    Microbiome-disrupting GMO food: In my understanding, it's a serious blunder. Like the one the Romans made, lining their water pipes with lead. Apparently, lead in the water poisoned bodies and minds, hastening the decline of Roman civilization. Aside from making us fat, what will GMO foods do for us?


    I put this impending disaster down to human ignorance, greed, and arrogance. It's a sad and humbling case of we don't know what we do not know. Mixed with there's a profit to be made, so why not?


    Product developers deemed weed-killer glyphosate safe for humans because, as we all know, humans are mammals. Glyphosate endangers only plants and microbes. In fact, in the early 2000s, Monsanto claimed a patent for glyphosate as a microbe-killer.


    Did the engineers and product managers developing Roundup® know that we humans are only about 10% mammal, the rest of us being a randy collection of microorganisms? That we depend on the microbes we host for our lives?


    I wonder whether they would have knowingly gone ahead promoting Roundup® for the short- term gain, even if the long-term prospect for the product was bleak.


    After all, who'll be around to buy GMO foods after those products have devastated their consumers' gut bacteria? After those consumers have become deranged, have keeled over, no longer functional in body and mind?


    What to do?


    Bottom line, as it seems to me: Eat non-GMO foods.

    Eat organic. Love your belly bacteria. Love your belly.


    © 2014 Self-Health Education




    ***************************************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!
    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~

  • Friday, November 21, 2014 7:30 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    3 Herbs to Start Using Today!
    By Linda Conroy
    www.moonwiseherbs.com

    I recently offered a talk titled 3 herbs to start using today. Deciding which herbs to talk about, was a wonderful journey. I chose 3 herbs very deliberately, after polling herbalist friends, as well as nonherbalist friends on what herb they would choose and/or like to hear about. The suggestions as to which herb to choose were inspiring and proved that it is difficult to choose only 3 herbs. It also confirmed by experience that 3 herbs can cover a lot of ground in supporting health.

    It occurred to me that if I was wanting to encourage the particpants to begin using the herbs I spoke about right away, one criteria for choosing the herbs would be that they need to be easy to procure. And if I wanted them to be something they could incorporate into their lives over time, it would also be wise to include herbs they could easily grow.

    The other criteria I was looking for was that the herbs chosen would support overall health. I wanted to the herbs to offer increased nutrients, to strenthen immune functioning and enhance cardiovasular as well as digestive health. Because our digstive system is the cornerstone of immune functioning, this body system is imperative to good health. And since cardiovascular disease is wide spread, keeping that system strong and healthy makes good sense.

    That said the following is a write up on each of the herbs I chose, why I chose to talk about each herb and how they can be prepared and incorporated into daily life.

    To your health!

    Linda

    1. Nettle (Urtica dioica*)

    *This is the species that I typically work with and ingest. Note that there are other species that can be ingested with similar benefits.

    I chose nettle for several reasons. First and foremost, it does grow in most parts of North America, so it it is easiy accessible. In addition, many health food stores have dried nettle avaiable. It also is is one of the most nourishing plants on the planet.If you look at the chart (linked below) created by herbalist and wise woman Rose Barlow, you see that nettle out shines common cultivated vegetables in nutrient denisty. Below is a link to the chart created by Rose. On the chart she outlines the amount of calcium for example in nettle comparing it to spinach and kale. For every cup of cooked green, the recommended daily allowance is 800 mg. Spinach contains 102 mg, kale 206 mg and nettle cotains 2900 mg. Here is a link to the actual chart describing nettle, along with other wild plants. http://moonwiseherbs.com/herbal-nutritional-chart/

    There is no doubt about it, nettle cooked or dried and prepared as a water based infusion, provides a power house of vitamins and minerals. The water based infusion, provides an easily assimilable medium or platform, by which the herb can be easily absorbed into the body. Here is a link, providing information on how to create herbal infusions or standard brews. http://moonwiseherbs.com/nourishing-herbal-infusions/



    2. German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla)

    or it’s analog or subsititute for the wild foragers among you: Matricaria discoidea, commonly known as pineappleweed, wild chamomile, and disc mayweed.

    When I began my talk, I asked participants to raise their hand if they had at least a chamomile tea bag somewhere in their home. Everyone in the room raised their hand. This is probably one of the most common herbs found in the American household. This is the main reason I chose to include this plant in my talk. It was my prediction that this plant would be immediately accessible to most people.

    Chamomile is an herb that is commonly known to promote relaxation and sleep. It is categorized by herbalists as a nervine. Drinking a tea of this plant and/or bathing in a 10 minute steeped tea is a classic remedy used to promote sleep and ease anxiety.

    Lesser known applications of chamomile are:

    ~An ability to reduce inflammation (both internally and topically).

    ~It is soothing to the skin and to mucous membranes.

    ~It contains properties that appear to prevent cancer

    ~And it acts as a bitter digestive aid.

    3. Garlic (Allium sativum)


    Garlic and other Allium’s are useful food to bring into your diet on a regular basis. It is of course readily available at any grocery store and it is quite easy to grow! This herb is probably one of the most accessible and most of us know how to incorporate it into a meal.

    Garlic is an effective antibiotic herb. It is in the same family and genus as onions, leeks and shallots. These plants are in the Lilicacea family, which contains many important immune boosting and infection fighting herbs.


    Garlic contains allicin, a powerful substance which is responsible for some of the plants healing properties. Some things to know about allicin:


    • Powerful sulfur compound

    • Formed when garlic is chopped, crushed or chewed.

    • Is converted into other sulfur containing compounds that exhibit antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and antiprotozoal activity.

    • Is the garlic plants defense against attacks by pests.


    Ways to prepare garlic for medicine:

    ~Most effective fresh, not cooked.

    ~Add to salad dressings, dips, spreads and/or cheese.

    ~Add to honey.

    ~Add to vinegar. A traditional preparation Fire Cider, can be made with garlic, onions, horseradish and other spicy herbs.



    As you can see these three herbs build and protect immune health, strengthen the body by offering essential vitamins and minerals and they support digestion, which is critical to overall health. Garlic supports immune, respiratory and heart health. So go out and start using these herbs today!



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Thursday, November 13, 2014 11:08 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Different Sweeteners

    by Anne-Marie Fryer


    Natural sweeteners have been around for a long, long time. The first ones which come to mind are fruits and honey. Traditionally these were seasonal or limited in supply, and so used moderately.

    In fact, all sweeteners have traditionally been used moderately in cultures of the past. It wasn’t until fairly recently that refined white sugar became widely available that sweeteners took a dominating place in the diet.


    There are many different kind of sweeteners and sugars. Usually they are referred to as carbohydrates, but carbohydrates are very different from one another. The simplest of the carbohydrates are mono saccharides, which means single molecules of sugar. Next are di-saccharides, which are two single sugar molecules linked together. The mono and di-saccharides are what make up many of our common sweeteners. The most wholesome of carbohydrates are called polysaccharides.


    Polysaccharidesare more complex carbohydrates. They are formed in nature in a chain of many mono saccharides linked together. When we eat polysaccharides in the form of whole grains, vegetables and breads for example, we find that they get sweeter in our mouth as we chew them. This is because the enzymes in the saliva are designed to break the complex carbohydrates down into simpler sugar molecules. In this way, mono saccharides are slowly and steadily released. The body uses them effectively without getting a 'sugar high'. These foods are absolutely the best to eat in order to satisfy the sweet taste.


    Mono saccharides, which we call simple sugar, are known as fructose, glucose ( also called dextrose), galactose, xylose, and sorbose. They are found in what we considered sweeteners. Fructose, for example, is the type of sugar found in fruits. In whole natural fruit, which contains some vitamins, minerals and water, fructose becomes more balanced and a better food for the body. In that form it is also absorbed a little more slowly into the blood, and therefore less harmful. However the product sold in health food stores as fructose is usually very refined sugar, processed out of corn.

    Glucose is another of the basic monosaccharides. It is found naturally in fruits, vegetables, and grains. When eaten in this form, the body uses it quite efficiently. However, when isolated and refined, it enters the body in the form of a simple sugar, and disturbs the balance of the blood sugar as other refined sugars do.


    Disaccharides, made of two sugar molecules linked together, are best known as sucrose and maltose.

    Maltose as the name suggests, is made from the malting of whole grains. Malting is a natural process that uses enzymes found in grains to produce the sweetener.

    Sucrose is what is found in white sugar. It is built of one molecule of fructose linked with one of glucose. Being overly refined and lacking in any other kind of nourishment, white sugar is hard on the health of the body. Other forms of cane sugar are also very harmful. Turbinaro sugar is about 2 % less refined than white sugar, and brown sugar is actually white sugar with a bit of molasses put back into it.


    When a lot of mono and disaccharides are eaten directly, whether in the form of fruit, refined sugar, or natural sweeteners, they are absorbed by the blood too quickly. This throws the body balances into chaos. It is therefor wise to approach all sweeteners cautiously and with moderation and consume them with a meal or with some kind of fat, like cream, coconut oil or butter.

    Low calorie and sugarfree sweeteners are for the most part mono saccharides. They are produced artificially from other mono saccharides using chemical processes. Since they are artificially produced they make even white sugar seem like a “health food”. Indeed, they can be much more harmful than sugar.


    OATMEAL COOKIES


    1 1/2 c rolled oats

    1 c whole wheat pastry flour

    3 Tbsp coconut oil

    3/4 c chopped walnuts

    1 c rice syrup or barley malt

    1/2 to 1 c apple juice

    ½ tsp vinegar

    1/8 tsp sea salt


    Mix all the dry ingredients first. Rub in the oil, add rice syrup, vinegar and juice, Mix it well. Form small balls, and flatten each on an oiled baking sheet. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 350 F for 20 minutes. These cookies are crispy and quick to make. For better digestibility let the cookie dough rest for 6 hours before baking.


    Variation: Add seeds (sunflower, sesame), or dried chopped fruits ( raisins, dates, etc.).



    NOUGAT


    1 c barley malt

    1/4 c water

    ½ tsp vinegar

    1 c rolled oats

    3/4 c roasted sunflower seeds

    1/2 c roasted sesame seeds

    1/2 c milk or cream or almond milk

    1 tsp vanilla

    1/2 tsp sea salt

    1 tsp cinnamon


    Heat the barley malt and water in a skillet. Add the other ingredients, and mix well. Press the mixture firmly into an oiled baking pan, and bake at 350 F for 10 minutes, or until golden. Cut into squares. For better digestibility let the nougat rest for 6 hours before baking.


    Variation: Mix with different chopped nuts or dried fruits.





    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.




    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.



    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


     
  • Thursday, November 06, 2014 6:09 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Blessed Mama Earth Balls
    Happy Full Moon in Taurus

    by Kathy Crabbe


    Dear Creative Soul,

    It’s the Full Moon in Taurus; an earthy, lusty, fixed sign that just loves life’s luxuries.  This Full Moon I am feeling guided to share something personal since Taurus does so love to get down and dirty; hands in the muck so to speak, and I do hope you join me!

    To start things off I pull a card from my Creative Soul Deck (aka my ‘lefty’ deck) for guidance.

    Ali by Kathy Crabbe (Creative Soul Card)Creative Soul Guidance: Ali


    Affirmation: I believe in me

    Ali, with the world on her head is a seeker and a finder of ways to help and serve human-kind; a heavy weight indeed, but loaded with joy and blessings as well.

    Where are you guided to serve? And do you serve already, or if not do you have any wishes and dreams for serving/helping others?

    As for me I’ve been a spiritual and intuitive artist for many years and I just love to share that with others through my writing, my art, my blog, my creative soul readings, my classes etc.


    Creative Soul Challenge

    In what ways could you better serve others and yourself in the process?

    How will you begin to serve or continue with what you’re already doing?

    I do pretty well in this regard, but I am also interested in public art projects which beautify sad and neglected places and help heal broken hearts and souls in the process. I am looking into a public art commission in Riverside County as well as reading an inspirational book by Lily Yeh called “Awakening Creativity: Dandelion School Blossoms”.

    emeraldEmerald’s Healing Song

    O Brave Soul
    you have traveled far
    to the Moon, to La Lune, to the Moon
    Oh Brave Soul
    who has known pain
    sadness and gloom
    Lift up your arms
    and shout, “I am here
    and I rise and I fall with Your tides
    and I
    am
    beautiful
    as are You.”
    Blessed be.

    Taurus Full Moon Circle Suggestions from my Goddess Zodiac Playbook

    • Gemstones: emerald, chrysocolla, moss agate
    • Plant/Tree: apple, daisy, poppy, rose
    • Herb/Spice: clove, sage, spearmint
    • Food: apple, bean, cereal, pear
    • Animal Spirit: beaver, cattle
    • Tarot Card: hierophant
    • Goddess: Demeter, Flora, Gaia, Hathor, Hera, Nokomis, Olwen, Rhea






    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, author and educator who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, creative soul classes, intuitive readings and online resources infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy's work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazine and books
    including the San Diego Women’s History Museum and the We’Moon Datebook. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and e-courses and maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and etsy shop.
     
    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen's University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992.
     
    Kathy has been an educator and mentor for Laguna Outreach Community Artists, the Sawdust Art Festival, HGTV, Wise Woman University, and Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show. Currently she is teaching her Creative Soul Class at Yoga for Life Temecula, Inspire San Diego and Mt. San Jacinto College.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.


    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell's Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Currently Kathy is studying Celtic Faerie Shamanism with Francesca De Grandis, author of
    Be A Goddess. Learn more here.

  • Monday, November 03, 2014 9:32 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Kiva’s Herbal Obsessions
    by Kiva Rose

    A personal welcome to the first in what will be a series of articles for this Ezine, including excerpts from the several books I recently wrote with my partner Wolf.  I’ll try to cover a little bit of everything herbal, from plant profiles to bioregional herbalism, always from my own perspective and experience.  I write not as an expert authority, but as an herb-obsessed misfit, a onetime street kid, and now a village WeedWife and committed wilderness dweller.

    Those of you who are familiar with me and Plant Healer Magazine know that my emphasis is on a community based herbalism that empowers the practitioner, on the inspiring stories and folklore of medicines, on the plants themselves and on what they can teach us about the needed healing of our culture and planet.  Part of our mission is to help seed the community of folks who feel like solitaries and outliers, rebels or visionaries, and those isolated root doctors and kitchen witches who don’t want to be measured by the letters after their names... not just practitioners in the clinical sense, looking for info and skills, but also impassioned plant lovers, urban foragers, wildcrafters, back-to-the-landers, tribalists, punk anarchists, tribal rockers, artists, and eco-activists.

    Thank to Justine and Susun for encouraging me to post here.  I’ll be gratified if anything I contribute in the coming months proves useful to you, or inspires you on your individual healing path.
    –Much love, Kiva


    Part I: Where My Skin Ends & Flowers Begin


    (from the book The Enchanted Healer)

    “Never in my life
    had I felt myself so near
    that porous line
    where my own body was done with
    and the roots and the stems and the flowers
    began.”

    -Mary Oliver

    At the periphery of all my thoughts are leaves and twigs, tangled together and growing along the boundaries of my imagination and ideas. The twining roots of Alder trees knot themselves into the bower between my waking and sleeping worlds, holding me always here – in the mountain forests and river canyons where the plants thrive and multiply, carpeting my world in a verdant profusion of color and scent.



    I am infatuated with all things wild, from a single red-pawed fox drinking from the river, to great dark clouds of migrating birds or small groups of human children laughing as they gather golden-brown nuts from underneath towering Oak trees. The diversity of the expressions of life on this planet never fail to intrigue and amaze me but it is the leafed and rooted things that most call to me. The trumpet-shaped blossoms of Datura and the creeping red and green glimmer of Purslane serve as a beacon for my eyes and I often find myself on hands and knees to see them more closely before I’m even aware that I’m moving.

    My first memories as a toddler are of plants, of Yarrow and Peppergrass thriving in my front yard. My nomadic history is marked from childhood on by the flowers and trees that grew wherever I settled for a while, by Honeysuckle vines clambering up island fences, by Pokeweed’s red stems shooting up next to our Midwestern barn door and by the Lavender fields of the Pacific Northwest. Anywhere I’ve ever even briefly passed through, the plants in all their myriad colors and shapes have been companions and markers along my winding path.

    I recently heard Matthew Wood say something like “I’m in this for the plants first” meaning that it was his deep love of interacting with the plants themselves that brought him to herbalism originally more than a desire to practice medicine. I smiled when I heard Matt say that because it’s a sentiment I’ve frequently expressed myself. Facilitating health and well-being in people is incredibly fulfilling for me. I experience a distinct and overwhelming feeling of satisfaction when I’m able to help someone feel better through my recommendations or assistance. But I won’t lie, if herbs weren’t available and the only avenue of medicine was chemical powders and patented pharmaceutical products, then I’d have to find a different way of helping people. It’s imperative to my own happiness and effectiveness that my work as a healthcare practitioner also provide a direct connection back to the natural world for myself.

    The herbs themselves are a primary part of what draws me to botanical medicine, and what compels me to find ways of matching plant to person in this complex and ancient dance we call herbalism. Plants are what initially attracted me to this field and they are the nourishment and inspiration that keep me excited and involved in it. Whether intently keying out some new species of wildflower, digging wild roots, formulating medicines for clients or lying flat on my back in an especially sweet patch of Melilotus, I am always searching out direct engagement with the green world that provides me with so much sustenance and solace.

    A portion of what I attempt to impart to clients and students is a deepened awareness of the natural world, and especially of the ways in which working with the plants can grant us a sense of at-homeness and belonging. In a culture where so many of us feel displaced this reconnection to food, medicine, self and community through place is of primary importance. We are made more fully ourselves by our relationship to the natural world, including the other animals, bacteria and plants we share our bioregions with. So much of healing is entirely about relationship. Relationship between a person and their body, between person and place, between person and plant.

    I am endlessly fascinated by all the ways in which humans and plants interact, both historically and in the present moment, across all cultures and geographies. We humans have evolved in every way to live with and be dependent on the plants. The kingdom of Plantae flourished long before our genesis as a species and will likely continue after we recede from the landscapes of this planet. Which only serves to make me that much more grateful for the beauty and breath they bring to our every moment. Each time I touch the soft weave of a cotton dress, hear the wind roar around the walls of our cozy wooden cabin or take a sip of the tea blended from wild herbs near my home I am reminded in a visceral, immediate way of how intertwined my life is with these green, sun-eating creatures I so adore.

    My obsession with all things plant-related extends beyond herbalism into botany, ecology, naturalism, wildcrafting, gardening and just about anything else that brings me closer to the plants, especially living plants in their chosen habitat. Nothing is so likely to fascinate and fully envelop me as crawling through the forest understory, breathing in the scent of life turning to death, turning to life in the shape of leaves falling, rotting only to unfurl from warm soil yet again. Down in the dirt, I look for every tiny flower, for each previously unnoticed tendril or bud. I want to know the texture of every sepal, the scent of flowers through their stages of blooming, the names of not only each plant but every plant part. The need to experience, witness and understand plant life is a driving force in nearly all that I do.

    Even at night the plants dominate my thoughts as I dream of vines that wind toward far away stars and luminescent flowers whose form I’ve never found in any of my many books on botany. I lay my head against the ground and listen to the pulse and mutter of roots all through my long hours of sleep. In the worlds of both slumber and waking, the plants are singing to me. Not so much in words or audible melodies, but in the rhythm of my own blood where it surges toward the surface of my skin when I reach for an unfamiliar spray of leaves, when I breathe in the sun-warmed scent of crushed Juniper berries. Where my skin ends and flowers begin.


    ********************************


    Kiva Rose Hardin is the co-founder and co-editor of the acclaimed Plant Healer Magazine, hosting a quarterly column by Susun and hundreds of pages of herbal art and articles.  She co-produces the unique Traditions in Western Herbalism Conference, offers her limited edition perfumes and elixirs at BrambleAndTheRose.com, and is the coauthor of several books including the trilogy The Plant Healer’s Path, The Enchanted Healer, and The Healing Terrain.  You can find more of her writings on her blog, and in the free Herbaria Newsletter available along with her books on her site: www.PlantHealer.org.






  • Tuesday, October 28, 2014 10:42 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Earth Friendly Organic Halloween Makeup, Celebrate the Pagan Holiday with Plant Essence Chemical-Free Makeup

    by Dayna Colvin



    Next to Christmas and Thanksgiving, Halloween is one of the most celebrated honored holidays of the year. It never ceases to amaze me how many people get into the spirit of the holiday and enjoy the festivities. 2,000 years ago, Halloween was a very sacred holiday celebrated by the Celtic people in the ancient British Isles. It was a holiday celebrated by Druids, Witches and Wiccan Covens, Fairies, Elves, and various other Celtic Tribes. On All Hallows' Eve, as it was called back then, the Druids would go from door to door holding an empty basket asking for fruit and whatever treats the residents would give them. Later in the evening, everyone would gather together in a festival, dancing, singing, playing, and enjoying the foods they were given.

    Many centuries later, Halloween is still a celebrated holiday, but today things have drastically changed. People still enjoy wearing costumes, pretending to be their alter ego. They also enjoy going door to door saying, "trick or treat" and asking for sweet treats, but the tradition has vastly changed. Halloween is probably one of the most expensive holidays. As soon as the summer begins to fade, stores begin stocking up for Halloween and the Christmas Holiday Season. Throughout the store, you’ll see the regular merchandise combined with racks upon racks of new Halloween paraphernalia.

    One of the biggest traditions of Halloween is the wild and elaborate costumes people design. Many people go with the traditional Angels, Ghosts, Devils, and Superheroes, while others opt for outlandish costumes, portraying celebrities in Hollywood. The costumes are usually cute, colorful, and beautiful and the makeup is a process all to its own. Dressing up and playing make believe, pretending to be someone or something else for a day is fun and exciting. It is a beautiful way to express the inner child. The problem is that the makeup and hair goo that is used to complement the costumes is usually toxic, smelly, and very harmful to the health. It’s fun to dress up and wear wild and zany colorful makeup and create funny wild hairdos that get attention. But when these products contain toxic petrochemicals, the fun disappears.

    I remember attending Halloween parties with friends and I always had a great time dressing up and checking out everyone’s costume. We always had such a great time trying to guess what someone was supposed to be and admiring the elaborate costume designs. Unfortunately, there was also a down side. Each person had bright or dark colorful thick makeup on and colorful hairspray with funky silver and gold streams sticking out of their hair. As soon as I would get close to someone, I would have trouble breathing, would start coughing, and I’d make a mad dash for the bathroom. At first, I thought I was crazy and I could not understand what was wrong until years later.

    When my husband and I began learning about holistic natural living, we began to question and analyze all the holidays. We were invited to a couple parties, but we started turning down invitations. I was no longer interested in wearing funky or sexy costumes with wacky colorful makeup because I could not find anything fun that was nontoxic. All those crazy facial makeup applicators and the silver and gold aerosol junk you put in the hair are permeated with toxic petrochemicals. That shiny silver and gold stuff that you use to draw lines and decorations around your eyes and on your cheeks is filled with petroleum, potentially toxic food dyes, and horrible fragrance.

    Those petrochemicals contain coal tar, the same smelly toxic chemicals that are used to pave roads and repair leaky roofs. Essentially, you’re putting gasoline on your face and in your hair! If you find this gross and appalling, then you’re paying attention. It is cheap and massively distributed to all cheap dollar stores and can make people very ill. The fumes from the adulterated scented products pollute the air, groundwater, and wildlife.

    An ugly horror is the fact that when toxic petrochemicals - pesticides, lawn treatment chemicals, perfumes, commercial fertilizers, and various other toxic petrochemicals - are sprayed into lawn grasses, trees, foliage, and flowers, the Fairies are usually present, hovering around the plant-life, caring for and being Stewards for these plants. The harsh petrochemicals are sprayed right into the Fairies' faces, suffocating them, choking them, and making them severely ill! It is an absolute horror and it cannot continue!

    The Fairies are delicate, fragile, vital integral parts of the Mystical, Spiritual, Unseen world and they rely on us to protect and respect them and their world. The Fairies carefully watch over and act as protective stewards to the Plant and Animal Kingdom and they need to be in good health to continue their vital work. This won't happen if their air is being made toxic with harmful toxic pollutants. The packaging winds up in a toxic landfill, where the toxic plastic will never biodegrade.

    If you want to have fun and get dressed up in some wild funky colorful costumes and makeup, opt for something that is safe enough to eat. Aubrey Organics and Aveda make some beautiful makeup, including some playful, funky, wild colors. There is no reason that you can’t have fun in a nontoxic earth friendly manner. Pure organic plant essences are safer for the environment and the recycled packaging they come in can either be reused or recycled. The cheap inexpensive little makeup applicators you find in the bargain stores are better off ignored.

    A really good way to enjoy Halloween and the Holiday Season is to make your own non-toxic earth-friendly makeup and check out some books with some good non-toxic tips. This Halloween, make a strong statement that tells the world that you genuinely care about Mother Earth and all Her Beautiful Creatures. Show the world that you know what it means to be a Pagan and that you are no longer willing to patronize those companies that only care about profit margin, even if it means polluting the environment.

    A true Pagan honors all the Natural Elements, the Moon, the Sun, the Stars, and knows the true meaning of respecting Mother Earth. Getting dressed up in your favorite colorful costume with festive makeup isn’t about playing games and acting foolish. Halloween is a special day about honoring our Spiritual Ancestors and Honoring the Spiritual Unseen World. The best thing we can do to protect and respect the Fairies, Spirit, and Unseen World and correct this horrible problem is to become avid strict label readers and vote with our wallets.

    Say “No” to greedy multi-nationals! Say “Yes” to organic, green, earth friendly conscious companies that care about Mother Earth, the humans, and the animals. Eat, live, shop, and be Green! Shopping at your local natural health food store and purchasing only those products and items that are 100% green, organic, and earth friendly, nontoxic is the best thing people can do to contribute to a cleaner greener Earth and reduce our carbon footprint upon Mother Earth.

    ********************

    Dayna Colvin resides in the Pacific NW with her husband. She is an advocate of environmental awareness and as a voice for compassion for animals. She has worked with Greenpeace and other similar organizations in raising awareness to the importance of wholeness, as well as environmental understanding.

    Upon seeing the dramatic positive results from her healthy choices, Dayna decided to share her knowledge, wisdom, and experience with the world.  This resulted in a series of articles and prose, as well as three nonfiction alternative health books and two unique visionary environmental adventure romance novels. Her organic beauty book teaches people how they can enjoy clean, organic, nontoxic, earth friendly beauty, using only 100% pure organic plant essences, completely FREE of harmful petrochemicals.  Her book teaches people how to distinguish and discern the truth from the lies that the multi-nationals are so good at shoveling with their obscene billion-dollar advertising, including how to read a product label.   To read more about Dayna and her writing, please visit the following web site: http://bodyearthself.blogspot.com


  • Friday, October 24, 2014 11:53 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Your Belly Microbiome:

    Not Yet Ready for Roundup®

    by Lisa Sarasohn


    I thought I was through writing about your gut microbiome, the population of 100 trillion bacteria that dwell in your belly.


    In previous posts I've written extensively about your belly bacteria, how they outnumber the cells in your body that carry your personal brand of DNA by a factor of 10 to 1.


    How the diversity of species within your microbiome and their relative numbers shape your physical and mental health, from autism and depression through irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on to obesity.


    How the ways you move and breathe, how the drugs you take, how the fermented foods you eat can make-or-break your gut microbial well-being.


    In short, you need the trillions of beneficial bacteria in your gut to be alive and kicking. They're essential to your welfare. Kill them off and you're in trouble deep.


    Trouble Deep


    Here's the news: Eat GMO foods -- foods made with Genetically Modified Organisms (lifeforms formerly known as "plants") -- and their weed-killer residues kill beneficial bacteria in your gut.


    How does this happen?


    Genetically Modified (GM) wheat, corn, soy, sugar beets, and other crops now grow in fields doused with Roundup®, trade name for the herbicide that delivers the lethal ingredient glyphosate. These genetically engineered crops are "Roundup® Ready," meaning that they're engineered to grow (albeit with reduced nutrient uptake) in the midst of chemical warfare on weeds.


    Although these plants survive the herbicide onslaught, they absorb glyphosate as they grow. Eat 'em, and you're delivering glyphosate to your digestive system.


    But the beneficial bacteria in your belly are not Roundup® Ready.


    Glyphosate eliminates these beneficial bacteria and their capacity to neutralize other microbe types that are up to no good. The glyphosate also interferes with your gut bacteria's ability to produce the four essential amino acids (constituents of vital proteins) that your body, being a mammalian body, is incapable of making.


    Your Friend Tryptophan


    One of these essential amino acids is tryptophan. Mess with your belly bacteria's production of tryptophan and you're messing with your brain's supply of serotonin, a neurotransmitter crucial to stabilizing both mood and appetite. Lose out on serotonin and you open the door to depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, overeating, and many other miseries.


    For a dramatic account of what can happen when a person's brain becomes deprived of serotonin, listen to Dr. Vince Gilmer's story on This American Life.


    But wait -- there's more, much more.


    For the details, you can read the paper by Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff enticingly titled Glyphosate's Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases.


    Although I'm a biochemistry aficionado, you may not be. Alternatively, you can turn to Prevention's take on their paper here.


    Harmless To Humans?


    Samsel and Seneff name "glyphosate's ability to disrupt the gut bacteria" as one of the most important factors contributing to the chronic diseases increasingly common in Western culture:


    Contrary to the current widely-held misconception that glyphosate is relatively harmless to humans, the available evidence shows that glyphosate may rather be the most important factor in the development of multiple chronic diseases and conditions that have become prevalent in Westernized societies. In addition to autism, these include gastrointestinal issues such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic diarrhea, colitis and Crohn's disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, depression, cancer, cachexia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and ALS, among others. (Entropy 2013, 15, 1443)


    Look in on interviews with wisewoman Dr. Stephanie Seneff here and here. Check out conversations with Anthony Samsel here and here.


    Monsanto brought glyphosate to the U.S. in the form of Roundup® in 1974. Given the story that the herbicide's safe to use, Americans have applied the weed- killer more and more lavishly.


    Today, more than 100 million pounds of Roundup® land on American lawns and farms each year.

    Global use of glyphosate-type herbicides now amounts to more than 900 million pounds annually.


    As Samsel and Seneff note:


    The notion that glyphosate has minimal toxicity in humans, widely popularized by


    Monsanto, has prevented farmers from using caution in their application of this chemical to their crops. (Entropy 2013, 15, 1442)


    Further Developments


    As might be expected, the extravagant and widespread use of Roundup® has spurred the evolution of mutant ninja -- a.k.a. glyphosate-resistant -- weeds. Which in turn has incited more intensive use of the herbicide. The chemical companies are developing new products to apply in tandem with the weed-killers already in their inventories.


    What to do?


    Stay tuned for the next month's post.


    © 2014 Self-Health Education


     


    ***************************************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!
    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~

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