Welcome!

The Library - Articles

  • Thursday, July 03, 2014 3:10 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    You, Luna, Universe: Part One

    by Lisa Sarasohn© 2014 Self-Health Education
    lisa@loveyourbelly.com




    I learned about The Moon and You: A Woman's Guide to an Easier Monthly Cycle when the author, Barbara Hanneloré, told me she'd selected words from The Woman's Belly Book for her own book's page one. I'm honored Barbara chose my invitation — that we women consider our bellies as sheltering "the creative energy kin to the majestic Power of Being informing the universe" — to set the direction for her book.


    In a warm and personal voice, Barbara offers practical ways to address, reduce, and perhaps eliminate pre-menstrual and menstrual distress, both emotional and physical. She does so by reframing the monthly cycle as an ally, not an enemy, provoking us to balance our lives in every dimension. She offers us the possibility of understanding and experiencing the menstrual cycle that we embody as kin to the cycle of moon phases and the circling of seasons in nature at large.


    Organized in five sections, and illustrated with delightful line drawings, the book guides us to:


    • explore our connection with these cycles of nature;

    • validate and nurture our inner lives with self-awareness and self-care in a variety of expressions;

    • nourish our bodies with balancing foods, herbs, and physical practices of many kinds;

    • understand the impact of cultural beliefs and values regarding menstruation on our personal experience;

    • remember and then re-imagine our first menstruation — menarche — as welcoming us into womanhood in the way we've always wanted.


    The third section, “Caring for Your Outer Life,” includes descriptions of several herbs to consider for menstrual health, along with the recommendation that the reader consult an herbalist for expert advice. References to Susun Weed’s herbal expertise are plentiful.


    Each section, in fact, provides references enabling the reader to investigate topics in greater depth. And each section concludes with an activity that helps the reader to integrate ideas and practices into the details of daily life.


    As a whole, The Moon and Youprovides an excellent resource for herbalists to use with their clients as a practical handbook for healing pre-menstrual and menstrual distress.


    Aside from the pleasure of knowing that The Woman's Belly Book has provided inspiration and support for Barbara's The Moon and You, two threads of interest wrap me up and draw me to this book.


    The first thread: For decades, my passion has been to inspire and guide women to honor and energize our bellies as sacred, not shameful. Releasing our shame, we can deepen our awareness into our bellies and tap into the Source Energy concentrated within our body's center. We can then direct the Source Energy we embody according to our intention, generating healing within any dimension we choose.


    As I've focused on women's common experience of shame with respect to our bellies, I've neglected our common experience of pre-menstrual distress and painful periods. Who wants to deepen their awareness into their bellies when their primary experience of their body's center is menstrual pain? The path Barbara is offering, relieving pre-menstrual and menstrual pain in the context of cultural awareness, may be the most accessible and direct route for women coming to honor the pro-creative power our bellies shelter. 


    Barbara relays Sobonfu Somé's revelation when she understood the healing energies that women carry within our body's center, this respect for women evident in the West African village of the Dagara tribe in which she grew up. "Something infinite" opened up in her, says Sobonfu. May that "something infinite" open up in each of us as well.


    As for the second thread, stay tuned for next month’s post.

    Lisa Sarasohn – You, Luna, Universe: Part One


    *********************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!

    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~

  • Thursday, June 19, 2014 1:04 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Choosing Local Plants: Bioregional Herbalism
    by Linda Conroy


    Relocation, as a bioregional herbalist (one who chooses to incorporate the plants that grow nearby) has proven for me to be an opportunity to connect with new plants on an intimate level.


    One of those plants is Monarda fistulosa, commonly known as Bee Balm or wild bergomot. While I grew Monarda didyma in my garden while living in Seattle, I did not harvest very much, as there were only a few plants. I occasionally harvested petals for salad and that was the extent of it. I had of course read about the healing qualities but was utilizing other more abundant plants for the purposes that I have since applied to bee balm. Since relocating and getting to know the ever abundant midwest native Monarda fistulosa, I have begun harvesting this plant in abundance. I incorporate her spicy leaves and flowers into salads, vinegars and honey. I dry the plant for infusions (steeped 2 hours for flowers) and enjoy her ever fragrant flowers in sachets.

    Monarda is a plant in the Lamanicea or mint family. The plant is aromatic and grows in what botanists call a subshrub pattern, in other words large clusters.

    Wild bergamot was also considered a medicinal plant by many Native American people including, (but not limited to) the Menominee, the Objibwe, and the Winnebago. It was used most commonly to cure colds, and was frequently made into a tea. Today, many families still use wild bergamot during the cold and flu season. It is often sweetened with honey to subdue it's strong flavor.

    Bee Balm has strong antiseptic qualities which stem from the fact that this plants contains thymol, or thyme oil. It can be applied for cleaning minor wounds and/or skin infections, as a mouth rinse for throat and mouth infections and it has been used as a carminative (an herb that reduces or expels gas). This plant also contains anitfungal qualities. While living in the Pacific Northwest, Red Cedar was one of my favorite plants for clearing fungal infections including athlete's foot. Today Mondarda is my choice.

    In many of the talks I offer, I speak to the need for choosing plants that grow around us. Many of use are familar with the concept of local food, yet few of us stop to think where our remedies come from. Historically people had everything they needed right around them and we can too. Many of the plants that we use, which come from afar can be replaced with plants that grow right in our own bioregion.
    Take the challenge.

    Here is a link to a wonderful article on this topic written by Rose Barlow Local Herbs

    Recipe for Mondarda Vinegar

    -Harvest the flowers of this plant when they are in full bloom. Follow the bees they will lead you there. Ask persmission, if granted thank the plant. I like to thank the plant by breathing and singing with it. Sharing breath is the greatest gift we can offer our green allies, acknowledging and keeping in our consciousness our dependence on them for every breath we take.
    -Place the flowers in a jar. Filling and packing the jar lightly.
    -Once the jar is full, pour apple cider vinegar over the plant. I prefer organic raw vinegar.
    -Place a lid on the jar. I have been using plastic canning jar lids, as they will not rust.
    -Label the jar, with the common name, botanical name, date and any other pertinent information.
    -Place the jar in a dark place.
    -Strain in 4-6 weeks. Store in a dark place.
    -Enjoy this on salads, in water to create a refreshing beverage and/or soak your feet in a diluted foot bath to clear up athlete's feet. Many wonderful uses!



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Friday, June 06, 2014 11:35 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    WISE WOMB, WHOLE EARTH




    Written & Illustrated by Roslyne Sophia Breillat


    The wild and ancient cyclic wisdom of the female womb has long been buried beneath the phallic male shapes of tall skyscrapers, the dishonest promises of greedy politicians, the constant noise of busy highways, the increasing piles of toxic waste that insidiously creep daily across her verdant valleys and through her sparkling streams. And during these turbulent times that are now raging upon this beautiful Earth, her integrity, her beauty, her love and her wise, wise ways are needed more than ever, for these feminine ways are now arising from secret places, from sacred places, from hidden places, from magical and mystical and mysterious places that have been pushed, forgotten, repressed and shoved out of the way by a civilisation that does not love or honour the natural rhythms of our beloved Earth Mother, that does not treat the abundance of her bounteous gifts with gratitude and respect.


    The way of the womb is the wholly and holy and sacred feminine way, and the way of the womb is the only way for every man to find his true place, his true home within the sacred masculine. The womb cannot fully open, fully give, fully receive, unless her profound and exquisite mystery is fully honoured, unless her fathomless depths are fully loved. Right now, upon this Earth, her cyclic and circular rhythms have become distorted, her flowers are blooming out of season, her rains are creating floods, homelessness and fear, her forests are becoming desert wastelands, her glorious offerings of abundant love and support remain unseen by too many.


    She is not just a pretty backdrop to be noticed and admired every now and then, but a powerful living essence and a powerful living presence of bountiful and impersonal and unconditional love. When you fall asleep each night, is your mind filled with turbulent thoughts, emotions, arguments, worries, discord and fear, or is your heart filled with deepest gratitude for the sacredness and privilege of living within this protective and supportive womb of the Earth, this beautiful, wild, wise womb of the Earth who also lives within you, within every one of us?


    Give thanks for this wise womb of our dear Earth Mother, be with her, acknowledge her, take her essence humbly and deeply into your being, give to her, walk upon her grass, sit upon her rocks, dance upon her sand, feel her, love her, awaken her divinity within your heart, within your womb, offer her the purity and humility of your gratitude when you eat, when you sleep, when you make love. Truly feel the fineness of her raindrops upon your face, the wild dance of her winds in your hair, the deep roots of her trees beneath your feet.

    If you gently and deeply open your womb to the womb of Mother Earth, you will feel and love and become united with the female spirit of the one womb, the only womb that shines within everybody, within every body, within every heart, within every soul, for becoming one with her wisdom will create wholeness, will create serenity, will create peace.

     

    Roslyne Sophia Breillat
    Website ~ www.wildheartwisdom.com

     




    Sophia (Roslyne Sophia Breillat) is a woman who lives, writes and paints from the heart. The inner richness and profound healing of her life experiences are inspiration for her flowing creativity.

    Her articles and art embrace the beauty, power and sensuality of the feminine essence and celebrate the natural flow of woman's transformational cycles. Her website offers a sacred space for woman to dive into the deep, to open to her true nature, to be who she really is.

    Sophia's training and experience includes primal therapy, intuitive massage, reconnective healing, writing, art and design, astrological counselling, instructional skills, training program design and teaching within the Aboriginal community. She has also facilitated many creative and inspiring workshops and courses.
     

    Sophie offers two courses at the Wise Woman University:


    ~ Being Woman ~ (detailed description of Being Woman online course)


    This six week online course provides a sacred and nurturing space where woman can learn to surrender more deeply to the natural receptivity of the female psyche. "...so blessed to have had gentle words of encouragement and support from you through the "Being Woman" course at W.W.U.... You have inspired me to continue my quest... Thanks so much!"

    ~ Dawning of Wisdom ~ (detailed description of Dawning of Wisdom online course)

    Throughout this series of lessons she will learn to trust the innate flow of her intuitive nature and to listen more intimately to the wellspring of her inner source. And we will explore together how to live more fully as the embodiment of the feminine essence within the structures of a masculine civilisation. "I LOVE your class, it is beautiful and thought provoking and well done... Thank you Sophia for your role as wisdom keeper, confidante and mentor."

  • Friday, May 30, 2014 11:24 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Grief: Weathering the storm
    by Dr. Jill Diana Chasse

    O fairest flower! no sooner blown but blasted,
    Soft silken primrose fading timelessly.
    -John Milton


    We grow up thinking that babies aren't supposed to die. They are brand new humans, meant to outlive their parents and live in a future generation. Unfortunately, reality teaches us that this is not always the case. Fading into heaven, babies often prove to the world that they too or often too mortal.

    When a parent loses a child the world goes dark. An outsider can only imagine the pain and try to ease the grief with words that do not always soothe. The stages of grief seem to be littered on a darkened road through a frightening forest, too terrifying to set foot upon, but it is only a matter of time, hope, support, and realization that sends the glistening light through the trees so that the journey may begin.

    After the devastating loss, many thoughts will float like storm clouds through the parents' minds. The first step through this process is to acknowledge those clouds and let the rain come. Discuss what thoughts you feel, whether rational or not. Express to a supportive friend, family member, or counselor what you are feeling inside. This begins the journey down that road. Without the first step, the darkness may be endless.

    Often, a grieving parent will find that friends and family may not be able to fathom their pain. They may say things out of love that come out with a painful sting. Remember that they are not in your shoes and are trying their best to help. Voicing your feelings will guide them to say things that you are comfortable with. Discuss what you want to hear and what you'd rather not. All parents are different and only by verbalizing your thoughts will others understand.

    Letting your storm clouds rain is a healthy catharsis that a grieving parent must accept. If you feel tears, cry. If you feel anger, scream. Only by letting the pain out can you let it go. After the catharsis, however long your personal process takes, you will find new clouds floating into your sky. Sometimes it will be bright fluffy memories; sometimes it will be dreams of your baby. Often, parents decide to change the present to escape from the pain, or choose to have another baby right away. Escaping and replacing will not bring back your baby or take away your pain. Give the clouds time to clear your sky, and continue the journey as the forest brightens. Healing will not come without time, patience, and dedication. It is not the time to make serious decisions; it is still time to heal.

    Meeting others who have gone through a similar experience is a healthy way to work through grief. Talking about your baby, sharing pictures, and hearing that you are not the only one to have such a tragedy befall upon you often helps parents being to see some light on their path.

    Communication is imperative between mother and father in this process. Men and women grieve differently, and just because your spouse does not react the way you do, it does not mean that he or she is not feeling pain. Talk with each other and allow each other to grieve in the way that is most comfortable, be it crying or paining or writing in a journal.

    There are many constructive ways of expressing pain and often, old hobbies, interests, and passions will be rekindled. When you feel you are ready, play some basketball or write a poem, but most importantly, let your body and mind accept something that makes you happy. This is not a betrayal to the memory of your baby. Both your tears and your joy express the love you felt for your child. The ability to smile shows the acceptance of your child's passing, and your capacity to heal and be happy.

    The journey is not an easy one, but it is a livable truth and the one that will bring you out of the dark forest of grief. Talk, cry, seek support, and love your child. The tears will fade, and the memory of your child will brighten.

     




    Dr. Jill Diana Chasse is maternal/child public health practitioner, an author and a counselor. Jill has been working with the mother-baby dyad in birth and psychology for over 20 years.

    She has studied midwifery at both Ancient Arts Midwifery Institute and Institute of Holistic Midwifery, holds Master's degrees in Psychology and Public Administration, and a Doctorate in Health Administration.  

    Personally, she loves the ocean, skiing, horseback riding, and cuddling up with her kids, hot coffee and a good book in front of a fireplace on a snowy evening.

    Currently, she works in public health for the federal government and teaches classes for the Childbearing Year at Wise Woman University, online, including the childbirth education method she founded, BEBE- Baby-Empowered Birthing Education.


    Listen to a 30 minute radio interview with Jill Diana Chasse


     
    Study with Jill Diana Chasse Online

    ~ Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support ~
      ( link to detailed description of Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support )

    Manage pregnancy and postpartum emotional challenges including baby blues and PPD symptoms to help reduce the risk of depression and keep yourself and your baby mentally and emotionally strong.  REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE - Baby Empowered Birth Education ~
    ( link to detailed description of BEBE )

    Baby-Empowered Birth Education is a Complimentary Natural Childbirth method for use with or without medications, at home, birth center, or in a hospital with key concepts of "Experiencing, Understanding and Enjoying" your labor and delivery through emotional support, empowering yourself, and empowering your baby. REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE Childbirth Educator Certification Program ~
      ( link to detailed description of BEBE for Educators )

    Become a "Baby-Empowered Birthing Education" Certified Childbirth Educator offering women and babies an empowering, magical, enlightening, and passionate natural choice for childbirth education, encouraging them to "experience, understand and enjoy" the Magic of Motherhood! REGISTER HERE
     

    This is an online workshop intended for parents who have lost a baby during pregnancy or after birth. It is a self paced, guided tour through the healing process to work through grief and bereavement issues. Working through these issues in this format is especially helpful in the early stages of grief when the shock and pain is still raw.
    REGISTER HERE



    Baby Magic for your Magic Baby
    By Jill Diana Chasse




    Baby Magic is a Spiritual Guide to Motherhood. Beginning before conception, Baby Magic guides a woman on her magical journey of becoming a mother.

    ~ORDER HERE~

  • Friday, May 16, 2014 2:43 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Bhujangasana: Dance of the Snake Pose
     by Sheryl Wolover

    Flow from a coiled to the lengthened position of Bhujangasana (Snake Pose) A.gentle forward fold into back strengthening movements Honor our garden snakes!





    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl
    http://www.pacific-elements.com/
  • Friday, May 09, 2014 1:54 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Sap Moon: Maple Syrup Time
    By Linda Conroy




    The sap moon has arrived! We have been the orchestrators of an Urban Maple Sugaring Project in our community for the past 6 years. Our project began with our own desire to learn about the process and add another wild food to our pantry. We now provide ourselves and our community with a locally produced sweet that is mineral rich. We tap trees throughout the city of Sheboygan, WI (population 50,000) with the permission of home and business owners. We share some of the harvest with the people who support the project. They of course enjoy the syrup and they learn that there is food right in their backyard!


    The project also includes collaboration with our local environmental center. The center evaporates our sap for us. The center has been tapping trees in their aging maple forest for many years. Their project is focused on providing a demonstration project for school groups and a community celebration of the harvest: Flap Jack Days. We help to tend the sugar shack and we give the center a percentage of the resulting syrup. After a long cold winter, we are thrilled to be able to participate in this community activity!


    A Couple of days ago, we and a host of other volunteers tapped the trees at the center. It was still a little cold for the sap to be running, but they are preparing for school groups and needed to have their demonstration project ready.


    It is ideal to tap trees just when the sap begins to run, as the resulting yield will be higher. The sap will begin to run when the daytime temperatures warm up above freezing. It has been a very cold winter here in Wisconsin and daytime temperatures have not yet reached above freezing. As we watch, weather predictions show that the temperatures will begin to rise next week. We are planning to tap trees for our project at that time.


    I like to tap the trees when the sap begins running, so that we can drink the first sap of the season right from the tap. It is a such a remarkable site to see the sap run from the tree, once you have placed the spile or maple spout. While today spiles are typically made out of alumumum, the stalks of many shrubby plants can be used today and have historically been used. Two of those shrubs are staghorn sumac (Rhus sp) and/or elderberry (Sambucus sp). We have used commercial taps, as well as made some of our own.


    As we begin collecting the sap, we will transform much of the beautiful mineral rich sap into syrup for use throughout the year. The sap to syrup ratio is typically 40:1, but does fluctuate depending on many factors. To learn more about maple sugaring view our video on maple sugaring at this link.


    In addition to transforming the sap into syrup, we also use the sap, which looks like water, but has a very slight sweet taste in other preparations. We also simply drink it. We like to use the sap as a base for teas and infusions. The sap adds minerals and a slight sweet taste to any beverage! We have partially reduced the sap and made maple soda as well as maple wine. These are some of the most delicious and do not last long in our house!


    We also use the water as a base for cooking venison stew. The sugars in the sap, tenderize the meat. The stew meat melts in your mouth. Of course you can use any meat that you have access to and your own stew recipe, just be sure to cook it slow for a long period of time. I like to use the slow cooker or crock pot for this.


    Cooking beans in sap, is something I learned from my dear friend Rose Barlow. Rose was an herbalist who was one of the inspirations for our sugaring project. She used to tap a couple of trees in her yard each year and she would make delicious maple beans. While Rose died a couple of years ago, she is always present in my kitchen when I put the beans and syrup together in the pot. Below is my version of her wonderful Maple Bean Recipe.


    Happy Sap Moon to all of you. May the change of the season be sweet and kind.

    Linda


    Maple-Baked Beans




    These baked beans are slow-cooked in a crockpot for about 24 hours.  As the sap slowly cooks down it turns into a sweet, maple-flavored  gravy.


    4 cups dried navy beans (or any bean)

    10 cups fresh maple sap

    Bacon or other fatty piece of pork

    1 Tbsp salt

    2 medium onions, minced

    1. Soak beans in water overnight in water and a TBS of whey or miso as well as piece of seaweed. If you do not have whey, miso or seawwed, you can simply add salt.

    2. In the morning drain, put beans in a crockpot and add 10 cups fresh maple sap. (if you are going to add bacon or pork, cook it on the stove, storing the grease for other uses. Add it when you begin cooking the beans and cook throughout, it will add additional flavor for those who enjoy meat.)

    3.   Turn crock pot on high and cook all day until beans are soft and tender. (if you prefer, you can also cook these down in the over on 175 degrees for the same time frame)

    4.   Add diced onions and a little more maple sap if they seem a bit dry or low on liquid at this point.

    5.   Continue to cook with the lid off of the crockpot overnight.

    These freeze nicely for use throughout the year. They are delisious served at barbeques and/or potlucks!




     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Friday, April 25, 2014 10:55 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    FEMININE WISDOM The Wellspring of Life

    Art by Sophia
    Written & Illustrated by Roslyne Sophia Breillat

    Long, long ago, the wise woman was honoured revered within many tribes, societies and communities all over this beautiful earth, for within every woman is an infinite well of feminine wisdom that flows and bestows wherever and whenever it is needed, wherever she is needed, if she is sweetly and peacefully open to this vast wellspring that arises and flows from her ancient womb mystery.

    Throughout the many, many years of patriarchal rule upon this earth, this abundant bounty of sensual, powerful female wisdom has become suppressed, unimportant forgotten and ignored. As this world of patriarchy rushes towards its forceful and force-filled demise, how many pause to feel, sense and see the outpouring sacredness of beautiful feminine wisdom that is offered to us, every moment, from our beloved Mother Earth, and how many recognise, honour and listen to this wisdom that rests and shines so deeply, peacefully, strongly, softly within every woman?

    How many moments each day are you aware of your female wisdom? How many moments each day do you create, speak and love from this wisdom? How many moments each day do you listen, pray, sing, dance from this wisdom? And how many moments each day do others acknowledge, heed, perceive and give gratitude to the divine sacredness of this gracious feminine gift that has sustained so many communities and tribes for Aeons? Your wisdom is so very much needed upon this earth right now, where myriad dreadful and dread-filled ravages of war, pollution and destruction increasingly proliferate and spread their unwise energy so greedily throughout cities, villages, forests, oceans, lakes and skies.

    And during every moment that this patriarchal world is inventing a new deadly weapon, a new toxic chemical, a new devastating war, the wise, wild heart of the earth still sings with the sensual joy of all creation and the wise, wild heart of woman still beats with the sensual power of love. For love is wisdom and wisdom is love and loving wisdom gives and wise love is here, right now.

    Dear, dear beautiful woman, speak your wise words, offer them, give them, clearly, strongly, gently, powerfully. Love from your wisdom, give your wise love where it is most needed, most acknowledged, most seen. Allow your bountiful wisdom to flow, unfettered, openly, spontaneously, freely, like the joyful birdsong of the birds who awaken with the rising sun. Honour your bountiful wisdom, give thanks each day for this powerful gift, open your wise, wise heart to the many joys of life and begin to live fully from the wise, wise life that flows through your womb, every moment, every night, every day.

     

    Roslyne Sophia Breillat
    Website ~ www.wildheartwisdom.com

     




    Sophia (Roslyne Sophia Breillat) is a woman who lives, writes and paints from the heart. The inner richness and profound healing of her life experiences are inspiration for her flowing creativity.

    Her articles and art embrace the beauty, power and sensuality of the feminine essence and celebrate the natural flow of woman's transformational cycles. Her website offers a sacred space for woman to dive into the deep, to open to her true nature, to be who she really is.

    Sophia's training and experience includes primal therapy, intuitive massage, reconnective healing, writing, art and design, astrological counselling, instructional skills, training program design and teaching within the Aboriginal community. She has also facilitated many creative and inspiring workshops and courses.
     

    Sophie offers two courses at the Wise Woman University:


    ~ Being Woman ~ (detailed description of Being Woman online course)


    This six week online course provides a sacred and nurturing space where woman can learn to surrender more deeply to the natural receptivity of the female psyche. "...so blessed to have had gentle words of encouragement and support from you through the "Being Woman" course at W.W.U.... You have inspired me to continue my quest... Thanks so much!"

    ~ Dawning of Wisdom ~ (detailed description of Dawning of Wisdom online course)

    Throughout this series of lessons she will learn to trust the innate flow of her intuitive nature and to listen more intimately to the wellspring of her inner source. And we will explore together how to live more fully as the embodiment of the feminine essence within the structures of a masculine civilisation. "I LOVE your class, it is beautiful and thought provoking and well done... Thank you Sophia for your role as wisdom keeper, confidante and mentor."

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 10:22 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Everyone gets a bit blue now and then. It is normal and natural for humans to experience an array of emotions. Children learn that feelings are natural as they watch feelings expressed. They experience different sensations and ways to deal with various sensations as they mirror and digest the collection of emotions being expressed by the humans around them. But when their budding life is saturated with an environment of utter sorrow, disregard, and loneliness through a depressed mother, the exposure ceases to be helpful.

    When that mother is clinically depressed, there is some hard evidence that is difficult to ignore, including reduced cognitive and language skills, social skills and irritability. If a new mother’s mood doesn't improve after two or three weeks, she may have postpartum depression (PPD). Not only is a mother’s mood affected, her body is as well. Sleeping and eating patterns change, likes and dislikes often cease to matter, including the new baby. Only about 10 to 20 percent of new mothers develop PPD, and carry the same symptoms as clinical depression. This can last up to a year, a vital development time in her child’s life.

    With a mom who is diagnosed with PPD, it is as if the child is in a jungle, never knowing if the lion is going to attack from behind a tree, or be nuzzled in her den sound asleep and peaceful. This puts the child in an uncomfortable situation. Starting at 2 months of age, negative effects can be seen in the child of a depressed mother including developmental and cognitive issues. Secure attachment can be threatened if the mother’s is emotionally absent, leading a baby to have difficulties interacting with his or her own mother. It ends up being a vicious circle in any case. The mother’s behavior agitates the child, which in turn agitates the mother. The key is to recognize and treat the cause of the initial agitation.

    Acknowledging the existence of depression is the first step. Attending a peer group for emotional support is a helpful way to share and recognize feelings and emotions, as well as obtaining support, a shoulder to cry on and a hand to hold. Sometimes this is all it takes to make a stressed new-mom see the sunshine and begin to share the warmth with her child. For more serious cases, where emotional support, sleep and sharing don’t help, a healthcare practitioner could help pull a depressed mother out of the jungle and show her the light. With love, support and understanding there is an excellent chance of recovery and a healthy, happy future for both mom and baby.

     




    Dr. Jill Diana Chasse is maternal/child public health practitioner, an author and a counselor. Jill has been working with the mother-baby dyad in birth and psychology for over 20 years.

    She has studied midwifery at both Ancient Arts Midwifery Institute and Institute of Holistic Midwifery, holds Master's degrees in Psychology and Public Administration, and a Doctorate in Health Administration.  

    Personally, she loves the ocean, skiing, horseback riding, and cuddling up with her kids, hot coffee and a good book in front of a fireplace on a snowy evening.

    Currently, she works in public health for the federal government and teaches classes for the Childbearing Year at Wise Woman University, online, including the childbirth education method she founded, BEBE- Baby-Empowered Birthing Education.


    Listen to a 30 minute radio interview with Jill Diana Chasse


     
    Study with Jill Diana Chasse Online

    ~ Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support ~
      ( link to detailed description of Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support )

    Manage pregnancy and postpartum emotional challenges including baby blues and PPD symptoms to help reduce the risk of depression and keep yourself and your baby mentally and emotionally strong.  REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE - Baby Empowered Birth Education ~
    ( link to detailed description of BEBE )

    Baby-Empowered Birth Education is a Complimentary Natural Childbirth method for use with or without medications, at home, birth center, or in a hospital with key concepts of "Experiencing, Understanding and Enjoying" your labor and delivery through emotional support, empowering yourself, and empowering your baby. REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE Childbirth Educator Certification Program ~
      ( link to detailed description of BEBE for Educators )

    Become a "Baby-Empowered Birthing Education" Certified Childbirth Educator offering women and babies an empowering, magical, enlightening, and passionate natural choice for childbirth education, encouraging them to "experience, understand and enjoy" the Magic of Motherhood! REGISTER HERE
     

    This is an online workshop intended for parents who have lost a baby during pregnancy or after birth. It is a self paced, guided tour through the healing process to work through grief and bereavement issues. Working through these issues in this format is especially helpful in the early stages of grief when the shock and pain is still raw.
    REGISTER HERE



    Baby Magic for your Magic Baby
    By Jill Diana Chasse




    Baby Magic is a Spiritual Guide to Motherhood. Beginning before conception, Baby Magic guides a woman on her magical journey of becoming a mother.

    ~ORDER HERE~

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 3:20 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    After work yoga stretches

    by Sheryl Wolover


    Forward folding in to a simple backbend. Downward facing dog, to scratch the dog's belly pose. This vinyasa opens the front ribs and stretches the hamstrings.






    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl
    http://www.pacific-elements.com/
  • Friday, April 04, 2014 2:07 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    MISO AND TAMARI FOR SPRING COOKING

    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt





    Miso is an incredibly nutritious and healthful food. It might be described as having the consistency of nut butter, only not as stiff and oily but very spreadable. Since miso is aged, it has its own hearty aroma and flavor, which is fragrant and stimulating to the senses. As a food, it is best known for its use in soup, where it might be described as a satisfying and flavorful bouillon. That is only the beginning of miso's culinary uses, for it makes terrific sauces for noodles, grains, vegetables and fish dishes. Also, it is popularly included in all kinds of dressings, condiments, and sandwich spreads.


    Traditional Japanese miso is made by people who spend a lifetime learning the subtleties of making miso. This includes all the aspects of various fermenting time, temperature, humidity, quality of ingredients as well as the special feeling for their product. It is necessary to really be in touch -to almost perfection -in order to make the delicate fermentation processes to transform soy beans, rice and sea salt into miso.


    Once the rice is inoculated with the living culture, koji, it is placed with beans and salt in kegs or vats, usually made of cedar, then placed under pressure. In these wooden kegs miso ages for an average of one to two years. However, some miso requires two to three years to mature, while a lighter miso requires just a good hot summer. The type of miso is determined by the ingredients, the aging time and the amount of koji and salt used.


    Miso and tamari are similar products in many ways. They are both made from soybeans, rice and sea salt fermented with a special culture (koji) that transforms these products into wonderfully nutritious foods. Traditional tamari was, in fact, a by-product of the miso making process and was the excess liquid that was taken from the miso. Today a variety of misos can be found in health food stores, such as sweet rice miso,, chickpea miso, rice misos, and barley miso.


    Shoyu and tamari are also processed very much the same way as miso. Being a liquid, of course, shoyo and tamari contain more water. Soybeans are fermented in big vats, impurities skimmed off the top and sediments discarded. Traditionally the fermentation process takes one to three years. Today the process is often speed up by using temperature controlled rooms.


    The difference between shoyu and tamari is that tamari is made from soy beans and sea salt only, while shoyu is made with soy beans, sea salt, and wheat. However, almost all of the so-called tamari in the Western world is actually shoyu. Tamari has become a generic term for both shoyu and tamari. Therefore, the names shoyu and tamari are interchangeable, as far as the western consumer is concerned.


    Authentic tamari, made only from soy beans, can be found marketed by different companies under such terms as "Real Tamari," "Wheat-Free Tamari," and "Genuine Tamari."

    The long aging process of both shoyo, tamari and miso is very important. The soy beans, salt, and koji culture breaks down the protein in the soy beans to amino acids, so that they are easily digested, even by those who have problems eating beans. All of the essential amino acids are there, and more. Since these amino acids combine well with other foods to make complete proteins, the addition of miso or tamari, to a dish, not only enhances flavor, but also the nutritional value by boosting the overall percentage of protein available in the food to be eaten.


    Traditionally made miso, shoyo and tamari contain many vitamins and minerals. It is also particularly noteworthy that they contain vitamin B12, which is generally hard to find in a diet that does not include animal foods. This makes miso and shoyu-tamari especially important as a supplement to a vegetarian diet.


    The salt during the aging process is also transformed, making these products last for a long time without refrigeration in temperate climates.


    Truly naturally fermented miso, shoyu and tamari are real store houses of nutrition and flavors.


    SPRING MISO SOUP


    1 6" piece wakame sea vegetables,

    2 Tbsp chopped scallions

    1 c onions cut into half moons or fresh wild onions

    1 c fresh nettle leaves, top shoot (optional)

    3 c water

    1 – 1 1/2 Tbsp barley miso


    Brush the wakame clean and soak it for 3 min. Cut it into thin pieces and place it in a pot with the onions and nettles. Add the water and bring it to a boil. Cover with a lid and let it simmer for 7 min. Dilute the miso in a little of the soup water. Pour it back into the pot and let it simmer for another 3 min. Garnish with scallions.


    •Variation: Use many different seasonal vegetables and herbs, add leftover noodles, rice, or other grains. Try adding beans, lentils, tofu, fish, beef, or chicken. The vegetables can be fried before the water is added for additional flavor.





    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.



     



    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.





    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


     
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software