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  • Monday, December 23, 2013 10:46 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Slow down and smell the spiritual theme
    by Kathy Crabbe



    It’s time to slow down and smell the spiritual theme. Once again I turned to one of the four Sylvia Browne books I had grabbed from my birth mom’s deathbed. These were books she had turned to in the last months of her life, and I asked the questions: “What is the truth? What truth is this Lefty painting sharing with me today?” Then I closed my eyes and opened up Sylvia’s book Soul’s Perfection and out popped the words “A spiritual theme.” This helped me a lot at that very moment especially after reading this part:

        A spiritual theme means that you will search for spirituality in everything you do…’even though it seems crazy, I’m going to use the silver and white lights. I’m going to use mirrors and encase myself in gold’…That’s one of the hardest things to know: when it’s time to move on.

    My birth mom moved on in May of this year but we  still ‘communicate’ all the time. Blessed Be.

    - See more at: http://www.kathycrabbe.com/2013/12/slow-down-and-smell-the-spiritual-theme/




    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, educator and writer who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, online resources, Divine Feminine eClasses and Creative Soul Readings infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy’s work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, magazine and books. She maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and Etsy Shop.

    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, Herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.

    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Learn more here.
  • Tuesday, December 17, 2013 1:50 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    HEALING THROUGH REVEALING THE SACRED FEMININE
    Roslyne Sophia Breillat



    A woman's love is grounded in the heart of the Earth. This, her womb place, her true place of belonging, the place of her inherent wildness, is where she comes home. From within the inexplicable mystery of this womb place, she creates from the vast ocean of her inner source, honours the exquisite essence of her divine nature, flows with the rhythmic dance of her lunar cycles, sensually receives her lover, tenderly cares for her child, trusts the infinite depth of her ancient wisdom.

    This place, her sacred ground, her sacred womb, is where she joyously, openly and intimately nurtures the heart of the sacred feminine. She cannot live from this timeless, all encompassing, all embracing place through striving, achieving, projection, force, or copying, insisting or believing that the ways of the masculine are the ways of the feminine. For when she lives like this, she betrays and denies the gentle yet profound wisdom of her true nature, of her heart, of her womb.

    The sacred feminine is a vast mystery of deep silence and loving stillness, a timeless wellspring of creative inspiration. The sacred feminine cannot be awakened, for She is eternally awake beyond the myriad layers of untruth that veil the infinite depth of her powerful presence. The sacred feminine cannot be discussed, understood, intellectualised, learned or taught, for She is perceived, received, nurtured, embodied, honoured, welcomed, reached and lived in love. The sacred feminine is within every woman.

    Women who have experienced sexual trauma have become disconnected from the sacred feminine. They have difficulty knowing when to say no and when to say yes. They are so busy trying to fend for themselves that they become unable to receive love. Many women become drained and exhausted through experiencing violence, for the feminine is abused in myriad ways.
    She is disrespected whenever the media uses her body to sell a computer, car, house or magazine. She is violated whenever a man lies to her or about her. She is abused whenever he dominates, disempowers, manipulates or controls her. She is psychically raped whenever he mentally undresses her or indulges in sexual fantasies about her. She is abused whenever he makes negative comments about her body, her clothes, her singing, her dancing, her creativity, her cooking, her children. She is disregarded whenever her perceptive female wisdom remains unheard and unseen. All abuse towards a woman is forceful, degrading, denigrating, insidious, violent, unloving, cruel. Physical, verbal, domestic and financial abuse of women is sexual, for all abuse towards women is sexual. And all sexual wounding of women creates a dark and empty chasm in the female psyche.
    Whenever a woman's body is violated, the feminine essence is dishonored a little more. Whenever one woman cries out in pain, all women suffer. Whenever any female is treated as a sexual object instead of a Goddess of love, all of humanity suffers. Whenever one woman begins to heal, she contributes to the healing of many other women, for all are united as sisters within a mysterious timeless place. Whenever a man enters a woman's body with true tenderness, humility, sensitivity, reverence and passion, love grows upon this Earth.

    Copyright ~ Roslyne Sophia Breillat ©
    Not to be reproduced without written permission of the author...
    The above article is an excerpt from Sophia's new book, "HEART OF THE EARTH, NURTURING THE SACRED FEMININE"...
    Sophia is a wise woman who lives, writes, and paints from the heart. Her prolific articles and paintings embrace the wisdom and grace of the female essence and the beauty of the Earth. She is acknowledged as a powerful and courageous writer whose creative work features in many international websites and magazines. Her website is an abundant offering of female wisdom that nurtures and inspires.
    Sophia is the author of WOMB OF WISDOM, THE SACRED JOURNEY OF MENOPAUSE and HEART OF THE EARTH, NURTURING THE SACRED FEMININE.

    Website ~ www.wildheartwisdom.com

    Email ~ sophia@wildheartwisdom.com




    Sophia (Roslyne Sophia Breillat) is a woman who lives, writes and paints from the heart. The inner richness and profound healing of her life experiences are inspiration for her flowing creativity.

    Her articles and art embrace the beauty, power and sensuality of the feminine essence and celebrate the natural flow of woman's transformational cycles. Her website offers a sacred space for woman to dive into the deep, to open to her true nature, to be who she really is.

    Sophia's training and experience includes primal therapy, intuitive massage, reconnective healing, writing, art and design, astrological counselling, instructional skills, training program design and teaching within the Aboriginal community. She has also facilitated many creative and inspiring workshops and courses.
     

    Sophie offers two courses at the Wise Woman University:


    ~ Being Woman ~ (detailed description of Being Woman online course)


    This six week online course provides a sacred and nurturing space where woman can learn to surrender more deeply to the natural receptivity of the female psyche. "...so blessed to have had gentle words of encouragement and support from you through the "Being Woman" course at W.W.U.... You have inspired me to continue my quest... Thanks so much!"

    ~ Dawning of Wisdom ~ (detailed description of Dawning of Wisdom online course)

    Throughout this series of lessons she will learn to trust the innate flow of her intuitive nature and to listen more intimately to the wellspring of her inner source. And we will explore together how to live more fully as the embodiment of the feminine essence within the structures of a masculine civilisation. "I LOVE your class, it is beautiful and thought provoking and well done... Thank you Sophia for your role as wisdom keeper, confidante and mentor."

  • Thursday, December 12, 2013 2:09 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    The Birthing Dance
    Jill Diana Chasse

    Movement is magic. Soothing and flowing like water- emotionally releasing and physiologically unrestricting. Movement balances the mind and body, excites the inner artist and allows empowerment and freedom. Unfortunately, many women do not use this power of movement when it is most necessary. Birthing a baby. When birthing a child, a woman is the epitome of flow and passion, but if she cannot allow that surge to move and shift, the restriction can lead to pain both emotionally and physically. Moving through birthing alleviates, lightens and dissipates the pain, allowing both mom and baby to passionately flow and unwind.

    Movement in labor not only increases a mother's comfort and level of control, it allows a woman's body to get into an optimal physical position to help release her baby. An upright birthing position with rocking or swaying motion allows gravity to help the baby descend and mom's cervix to open. It can also help move the uterus forward and increase the size of the pelvic outlet. It is an evidence-based way to help reduce interventions and increase a healthy and calm birth outcome.

    When birthing at home, or at most birth centers, movement restriction is not a factor. At the majority of hospital this is not the case. Policies, regulations and old faded rules that have no place in evidence-based healthcare outshine the needs of mother and child. Too often women are physically and emotionally put in a subservient, submissive position leading not only to psychological trauma but often medical problems as well.

    Speaking up about movement can help to reduce the adverse effects of movement restriction. Even in a hospital setting, dancing through birthing is possible. Sitting up or squatting in bed- swaying to soft tunes on the radio or singing to yourself while leaning up against your partner can be done anywhere. There is no medical reason not to drink during laboring, so an IV is generally not needed. For low risk moms, continuous fetal monitoring does more harm than good. There is no medical reason to strap a laboring mother to a bed. Midwives are trained in intermittent auscultation using a fetoscope to check on the baby's heartrate as labor progresses. This can be done in a hospital setting as well, even by a doctor or nurse using a portable Doppler.

    Movement through birthing, including dancing, flowing, and actively choosing an upright birthing position has physical, psychological and emotional advantages for both mother and baby. This leads to an easier and faster birth, reducing interventions and distressful birth outcomes and increasing peace, serenity and wellness.




    Dr. Jill Diana Chasse is maternal/child public health practitioner, an author and a counselor. Jill has been working with the mother-baby dyad in birth and psychology for over 20 years.

    She has studied midwifery at both Ancient Arts Midwifery Institute and Institute of Holistic Midwifery, holds Master's degrees in Psychology and Public Administration, and a Doctorate in Health Administration.  

    Personally, she loves the ocean, skiing, horseback riding, and cuddling up with her kids, hot coffee and a good book in front of a fireplace on a snowy evening.

    Currently, she works in public health for the federal government and teaches classes for the Childbearing Year at Wise Woman University, online, including the childbirth education method she founded, BEBE- Baby-Empowered Birthing Education.


    Listen to a 30 minute radio interview with Jill Diana Chasse


     
    Study with Jill Diana Chasse Online

    ~ Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support ~
      ( link to detailed description of Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support )

    Manage pregnancy and postpartum emotional challenges including baby blues and PPD symptoms to help reduce the risk of depression and keep yourself and your baby mentally and emotionally strong.  REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE - Baby Empowered Birth Education ~
    ( link to detailed description of BEBE )

    Baby-Empowered Birth Education is a Complimentary Natural Childbirth method for use with or without medications, at home, birth center, or in a hospital with key concepts of "Experiencing, Understanding and Enjoying" your labor and delivery through emotional support, empowering yourself, and empowering your baby. REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE Childbirth Educator Certification Program ~
      ( link to detailed description of BEBE for Educators )

    Become a "Baby-Empowered Birthing Education" Certified Childbirth Educator offering women and babies an empowering, magical, enlightening, and passionate natural choice for childbirth education, encouraging them to "experience, understand and enjoy" the Magic of Motherhood! REGISTER HERE
     

    This is an online workshop intended for parents who have lost a baby during pregnancy or after birth. It is a self paced, guided tour through the healing process to work through grief and bereavement issues. Working through these issues in this format is especially helpful in the early stages of grief when the shock and pain is still raw.
    REGISTER HERE



    Baby Magic for your Magic Baby
    By Jill Diana Chasse




    Baby Magic is a Spiritual Guide to Motherhood. Beginning before conception, Baby Magic guides a woman on her magical journey of becoming a mother.

    ~ORDER HERE~

  • Wednesday, November 27, 2013 2:51 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)


    Your Belly, Your Primordial Planet Part 6

    by Lisa Sarasohn


    What’s in a belly?


    You’ve considered your belly as host to 100 trillion bacteria. These single-celled creatures — your gut microbiota — shape your physical and mental health.


    The bacteria constituting your gut microbiome differ by species and the size of each species’ population. Given all this variation, when your belly bacteria maintain a dynamic balance among themselves, they promote your digestion, immunity, hormone production, nerve communication, and more.


    Destabilizing the balance among your gut bacteria likely plays a key role in body-mind disorders such as anxiety, autism, obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and allergies.


    While the gut microbiome’s impact on all dimensions of our well-being may be relatively new news for Western medicine, it’s long figured in a standard diagnostic test — the stool sample.


    As TV’s “Scrubs” proclaims in song and dance, “Everything Comes Down To Poo.” Click here for the lyrics.

    You can also see the clip, from episode 6 of the show’s season 6, on YouTube.




    In the previous installment, I suggested that you are a torus, a geometry that makes “inside” continuous with “outside.” You are a vessel circulating the life energy that animates the universe. Your belly — encompassing both your gut microbiome and your energetic hara— centers the sacred shape, the vesica, that the torus in cross-section delineates.




    Source: Wendy Howard,
    Does it Matter?


    Toruswas one of three codewords I promised you in relation to the gut microbiome. The others: Primordial. Gaia.


    The trillions of bacteria populating your gut microbiome, arrayed around your body-centered sourcepoint, carry forth an ancient lineage. Bacterial life forms originated more than 3 billion years ago. With such an ancestry, we might call these beings primitive. Better yet: primordial.


    At the very center of who you are is this universe of primordial organisms ancient in shape, function, structure. As qigong teacher and internal alchemist Michael Winn suggests, these bacteria “represent the larger collective field internalized within humans — our shortcut path to accessing the environment.” We live within the universe; the universe lives within us.


    Within our bellies, we host beings that trace their origin to the beginnings of life on this planet. I suspect that, as we live all the more through our center of being we enter more deeply into primordial knowing and more fully access primordial wisdom.


    We delve into primordial wisdom not only in resonance with our gut microbiome but also in resonance with planet Earth, a being the Greeks revered as Goddess Gaia. Many peoples have known Earth to be sentient, sacred. Some Taoist traditions, for example, recognize the planet’s core as the abode of the Sacred Feminine. A Chinese term for the body’s center, meaning the “Gate of the Mysterious Female,” suggests Goddess dwells within our core as well.



    Source: Lisa Sarasohn,
    BodyEarth


    We live within Gaia; Gaia lives within us. Earth’s center, body’s center: the resonance is here for us to experience — not through ideation or analysis but directly through meditation, movement, art, image.


    Earth’s center, body’s center: I express the resonance I sense, for example, through this poem:


    Terra’s Magnetism


    You draw me to you, dreaming,
    beckon me tenderly.


    Tending toward home I go,
    to the mother lode,
    magneto spinning at center,
    attending to breath,
    intending to unite,
    guided by whispers and tendrils of grace.


    The blood in my veins and my
    rich-blooded womb,
    as red as the iron, the ocher in yours,
    sings your songs to me,
    makes me crave your company.


    I prepare to meet you, greet you,
    coloring my hair, hands, feet with henna,
    core seeking molten core:
    stoking the fire,
    heating the ore,
    compressing the passion.


    Open to the intercoursing of breath, caress,
    animated by instinctive elegance,
    by consolidated essence,
    the resonance of bellies,
    your magnetic tenderness,


    I settle into your embrace.


    Earth’s center, body’s center: The Alignment meditation presented in The Woman’s Belly Book and on the Honoring Your Belly DVD offers another way to sense your pivotal connection with the planet, as well as your intimate link with Spirit. As you move through this pose, you’re essentially aligning your belly’s power to promote creation with the grace of heaven and earth.



    Source: Lisa Sarasohn,
    Alignment


    Each gesture in the power-centering Honoring Your Belly sequence enacts a prayer. The prayer that accompanies Alignment provides a fitting conclusion to this series of articles:


    May all our actions be effortless, playful;
    may our hearts’ desires be manifest;
    may the universe accomplish her purpose
    through us.


    Blessed be.




    (c) 2013 Self-Health Education, Inc.


    *********************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!

    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~

  • Friday, November 15, 2013 2:16 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Deep Roots: Pickled Burdock
    With Linda Conroy of Moonwise Herbs


    www.moonwiseherbs.com
    www.midwestwomensherbal.com

    Burdock (Arctium sp) is one of the most nourishing herbs on the planet. It’s long tap root reaches deep into the soil and pulls up minerals, storing them in it’s roots. These nutrients are then rendered bio available to our bodies once we ingest them. Western herbalists consider burdock to be a blood “cleanser” and I like to be more clear in that it nourishes the liver, which supports our bodies with elimination. Burdock also nourishes the blood, it does not deplete as the wording “cleanser” insinuates. It actually, deeply nourishes and replenishes while also assisting the liver in functioning more effectively. In doing this burdock is known for it’s ability to clear skin conditions, from eczema to acne.    So you can see that ingesting these pickles can nourish the body in very deep and long lasting ways.

    As for harvesting, we harvest burdock root in the late fall, just before the ground freezes. The roots contain the most nutrients, at that time, as the plant has stored them for it’s own winter nourishment. You can also purchase burdock root in asian grocery stores as well as health food stores. Burdock is a biennial (a plant with a two year life cycle) and like many plants with a two year life cycle, the root is harvested in the fall of the first year. When harvested at this time of the year the root is a tender vegetable. In Japan burdock is known as gobo and is considered a staple vegetable. When prepared properly it is tender and delicious. I love to pickle the roots and to eat them as part of my daily nourishment, particularly during the winter months. I learned to make these pickles from one of my first herb teachers, Eaglesong Gardner. I am ever grateful, as many years later we still make these with our own twists to the recipe. I like to make one or two gallons which will last through the winter months.



    Making Burdock Pickles

    1. Slice burdock roots. Can be in strips or coins, but which ever style you choose it

    is ideal to slice them evenly


    2. Place sliced roots in a steaming basket and into a pot. Add a small amount of water to the bottom. Steam for 5-10 minutes.


    3. While the roots are steaming slice a small amount of garlic and ginger.  Wild leeks, wild ginger and turmeric can be added as well. Place garlic and ginger in a proper size jar for the amount of root that you have. I use quarts or 1/2 gallons.


    4. .  Prepare the brine. The brine consists of:

    -1 part cider vinegar (I like to use raw, unpasteurized apple cider vinegar)

     -1 part tamari or shoyu (both fermented soy products)

     -1 part steamed burdock water.


    5..   When roots are steamed, pack into jars. Once roots cool down, pour the brine over them. I like to have everything cool, so that the beneficial bacteria in the vinegar and the tamari renders these a fermented food product, beneficial to the digestive system.


    *burdock contains inulin, which is a prebiotic substance, also beneficial to the digestive system.

     

    6.I like to leave these on the counter for a day or two, until the flavors meld. Then I place them in the refrigerator. They can be stored there indefinitely.

     

     

    7.We like to nourish our bodies by eating a couple of pickles a day.

     

    We hope you enjoy these as much as we do! 




     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.


  • Thursday, November 07, 2013 3:13 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Opening the hips with Gomukhasana ..... Cow Faced Pose
    with Sheryl Wolover

    Gomukhasana the Cow Faced Pose is a beautiful "hip opener". It has the power to stretch the legs away from the SI joint and open the front body~
    If you are one who spends much time in a chair at work, you will find this pose to become your best friend~






    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl

    http://www.pacific-elements.com/
  • Thursday, October 31, 2013 2:37 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Life-Giving Salt and Miso
    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt

    sea salt


    We need a variety of minerals in our diet. Of these minerals the most valuable to us is sea salt. Many people today often overlook how important sea salt is for our health.
    Salt hasn't always been thought of so lightly. Just a short time back, in human history, people were fighting wars to control salt trade. Empires were formed on it, and have collapsed because of it. Roman soldiers were paid a "salary" of salt, which was called "salarium," and they fought the Celts for the possession of via salaria, the road to the salt. And others have praised salt. To Plato, salt was "Dear to God." Homer said, "Salt is Divine." Jesus Christ noted, "Salt is good. Have salt in yourselves and be at peace with one another".

    Both the warlike and the spiritually oriented agreed on something, that salt is extremely important to our health. Realizing this importance, people have used salt, not only in rituals, as an addition to their food, but also to form new products. For instance, using salt, the Japanese have developed tamari and miso, which are wonderfully nutritious and tasty seasonings.
    Japanese legend has it that the gods themselves brought the secret of miso as a gift to people at the beginning of their civilization. Historians say that Buddhist monks brought miso with them when they carried their teachings to Japan. Whichever is correct, the Japanese have had a dedication to miso for centuries.

    Until recently, almost every Japanese family had its own miso making tradition, and making farmhouse miso was as much a part of the yearly cycle as were planting and harvesting. Next to rice, it is probably the most basic staple in their diet, and the largest contributing factor to their health and longevity.

    Below are three delicious fermented foods recipes made with miso. They are quick and very easy to make. Experiment with a variety of different types of miso.

    CARROT TOPS IN MISOCarrots

    2 c finely chopped carrot tops
    1/2 c water
    1 tsp miso

    Mix the miso with 3 Tbsp water. Place the tops in a pan with the rest of the water and let it simmer, covered for 10 min. Pour the miso over and mix well. This condiment is very tasty; use 1 tsp per person.

    •Variation: Use other green tops or wild plants such as dandelion leaves. Season with ginger or add roasted ground sesame seeds.

    TANGARINE PICKLES

    3 organic tangerines
    1/2 c miso

    Cut the peel of the tangerines in bite sized pieces. Place them in the miso and let it sit for 2—10 days in a cold place. Serve on fish or fried dishes.

    •Variation: Use the peel of oranges, lemons, etc. in the same way.

    MISO PICKLES

    1 jar filled 1/2 full with miso
    Firm whole or parted vegetables like roots, garlic, ginger and onion

    Clean and dry the vegetables. Place them in the jar and cover them completely with the miso, try not to have them touch each other. After 2-4 weeks, depending on the size of the vegetables, they are done. Rinse off the miso and cut the pickles in thin slices. Serve in grain or vegetable dishes. These delicious pickles are superb year round, but especially in the autumn and winter.

    •Variation: Cut the vegetables in smaller pieces, parboil them for 30 sec. and let them cool before covering them in miso. They will be done in 2 days. The vegetables will keep in miso for several months. If they become too strong soak them in a little water. Raw fish can be pickled in same way.




    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.



     



    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.





    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


     
  • Friday, October 25, 2013 11:28 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Your Belly, Your Universe Part 5

    by Lisa Sarasohn



    What’s in a belly?

    To review: Your belly plays host to 100 trillion bacteria. These single-celled creatures — your gut microbiota — shape your physical and mental health. When the many kinds and varying populations of your belly bacteria maintain a dynamic balance, they vitalize your digestion, immunity, hormone production, nerve communication, and more.


    Imbalance among and depletion of the gut bacteria likely plays a key role in body-mind disorders such as anxiety, autism, obesity, irritable bowel syndrome, autoimmune diseases, and allergies.


    If certain kinds of detrimental bacteria predominate, such imbalance can manifest as a specific infection. But even if infection is not evident, imbalance within the microbiome can cause persistent inflammation. As a result, the immune system remains on constant alert and the stage is set for chronic disease.


    In previous installments, you’ve read how ancient icons of the Sacred Feminine may document the gut microbiome’s healing power, how traditional cuisines replenish your belly’s supply of beneficial microbiota, how soil microorganisms riding in on the organic vegetables you eat constitute a crucial component of your microbial population.


    You’ve also considered the role that movement and breathing exercises — by compressing, expanding, rotating, and twisting your belly — may play in mobilizing your gut microbiome, energizing your bacterial to serve your physical and emotional health all the more effectively.


    Medical research on the gut microbiome calls into question conventional concepts of the body, health, and disease. With only 10% of your genetic material sporting the DNA that is uniquely yours, who are you and what exactly is your body?


    Researchers and science writers are grasping at metaphors.


    In Germs Are Us, for example, the New Yorker’s Michael Specter quotes Martin J. Blaser, chairman of the Department of Medicine and a professor of microbiology at the New York University School of Medicine, as saying “We are an endlessly variable stew of essential microbes.... But the microbiome is never static or simple; often it’s a battleground between species. The difficult job of medicine is to control that battleground.”


    Contemporary Western culture — invested in the primacy of the rational mind — typically considers the body to be a soulless machine. Genetics provides the blueprint for putting the machine together.


    Specter offers a different image: “Each of us seems more like a farm than like an individual assembled from a rulebook of genetic instructions. Medicine becomes a matter of cultivation, as if our bacterial cells were crops in a field.”


    We might think of ourselves as a farm, or garden. Or a zoo.


    Scientific papers characterize the gut microbiome as a human organ; the body as a habitat, a host ecosystem; human beings as “superorganisms.”


    What’s so “super” about playing host to trillions of bacteria, a.k.a. germs? It’s incredibly humbling to know that we humans, the pride of eons of evolution, depend on single-celled microorganisms for our most intimate physiological functions. It’s humbling to know that these life-or-death dealing microorganisms outnumber our homo sapiens cells by a ration of 10 to 1. Bacteria? They’re so primitive.


    In the previous installment, I promised to address microbiome, human body, and Body Earth in an imaginative, intuitive way. I asked you to stay tuned for these codewords: Primordial. Gaia. Torus.


    Here we go. Let’s take torus first.


    If you’ve eaten a doughnut, you’ve ingested the structure of the universe. That tubular circle enclosing a double-vortex void: That’s the torus. That’s the shape of the universe and everything in it. That’s you.


    As Foster Gamble of the Thrive Movement says, a torus is an “energy vortex that you can see everywhere … in atoms, cells, seeds, flowers, trees, animals, humans, hurricanes, planets, suns, galaxies and even the cosmos as a whole.”


    The torus guides energy into motion and matter into form in every corner of the universe. The doughnut or “ring torus” is actually just one toroidal form. Others include:



    Source: Weisstein, Eric W. "Standard Tori."
    MathWorldmathworld.wolfram.com/StandardTori.html


    Picture a sphere open at top and bottom, rotating around its vertical axis, lines of energy swirling up and around its curving surfaces. Arriving at the opening at top, the swirl of energy descends through the sphere’s inner core, a vortex narrowing as it tunnels downward into a single point at the sphere’s very center. From this point, the swirl widens as it continues to descend, eventually spiraling outward to define the opening at the bottom of the sphere, then returning to the sphere’s outer surface and continuing to trace the continuity of exterior and interior, fullness and emptiness.


    Or look here:


    Source: Wendy Howard, Does it Matter?


    An apple is a torus. You are a torus. Stand with your feet more than shoulder-width apart, signify an upward-pointing triangle: Earth your base, your legs the equilaterals, your belly center the apex.


    Now with your arms extending from this same belly center, raise your arms up to the Heavens, shape an upward-pointing triangle.


    You, this emblem of Heaven-and-Earth, your downward- and upward-pointing triangles emerging from, returning to unite at a single point: your belly center, your sourcepoint.




    Source: Lisa Sarasohn, Rite for Invoking the Sacred Feminine


    Breathe out who you are, send your gift through to the far reaches of the universe. Breathe in who you are, the gift that streams from the far reaches of the universe into your body’s center.


    Breathing out and in, rooting downward and reaching upward from your body’s center, now imagine yourself spinning, being spun around your central core. Your legs and arms, the conjoined triangles you signify, define the torus’ interior emptiness and its exterior fullness.


    You are a torus. You are a vessel for the inflow and outflow, the continuing circulation of the life energy that juices the universe. Stop that flow, put a lid on it, close the trap door, and you’re setting yourself up for a cosmic battle. The spoils of such a war: fatigue, boredom, frustration, anger, resentment, illness. Did I mention weight gain?


    You are a torus. From mouth to anal opening, you are the somewhat convoluted passageway open to the comings and goings of the universe. Your belly — your body’s center, your hara — is central to the sacred shape called vesica that the torus in cross-section delineates.




    Source: Wendy Howard, Does it Matter?


    You are also primordial. And Gaia incarnate. How? That’s for the next installment.



    (c) 2013 Self-Health Education, Inc.



    ****************************************************************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!

    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~

  • Thursday, October 17, 2013 12:34 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Mushrooms: Fungi for Health
    By Linda Conroy





        I am a big fan of mushrooms. I love to cook with them and eat them. I have not found a mushroom that I did not enjoy. Earlier today, I was preparing a vegetable soup and added mushrooms to the slow cooker. When I sat down for dinner and ate the soup, I was reminded of the many mushrooms I harvested and ingested during the past year. I remembered the long hikes during last years spring morel mushroom hunt. I was also reminded of the puff ball mushrooms we found in our neighbor's field last summer and how abundant the chanterelle mushrooms were in the woods. We ate mushrooms often during the summer apprenticeship program and I am confident our immune systems were thanking us.

    I have long been an avid wild harvester. Preferring to find my food in the woods or fields rather than the grocery store. Mushrooms made me nervous for a long time. Prior to moving from the west coast to the midwest, I was comfortable harvesting only two mushrooms and even then I was very careful, as one should be. Today I am happy to say that I enjoy harvesting close to 20 mushrooms and and each year I add to my mushroom repertoire. 

    I have long been aware of the immune boosting benefits of eating mushrooms. I also know that they contain a wide spectrum of nutrients including B vitamins, vitamin K, copper, potassium, selenium and other trace minerals. So, I was not surprised when I recently read an article in the Acres USA Farming Magazine, that research is being conducted on the vitamin D content of mushrooms. Similar to humans mushrooms need to be exposed to light in order to synthesize vitamin D. This is an important factor, as most commercial button mushrooms are grown in the dark, so unless they have been exposed to light, they will not convert the necessary compounds. Wild mushrooms and particularly those that are exposed to sunlight are the ideal mushroom for promoting health. Although it should be noted that sitting your mushrooms in a sunny window for a day or two will enhance the vitamin D content.

    This information is really inspiring to me, as I am continually trying to find ways to increase the nutrient density of my food. There has been a lot of attention in recent years, being paid to studies indicating that vitamin D is an important nutrient for maintaining health. Many providers of health care are encouraging their patients to ingest vitamin D supplements. As with nutrients in general I prefer to introduce them to my body through food not capsules or pills. I really do trust that with information and creativity we can assimilate the nutrients we need through our food.

    So while, I will continue to eat whatever mushroom is presented to me, I am more committed than ever to eating wild or home grown mushrooms on a regular basis.

    If you decide to harvest your own mushrooms be sure to consult a reliable field guide and/or spend time with someone who is knowledgeable about mushrooms. A good book is titled: Start Mushrooming by Stan Tekiela and in many areas you can find a local mycological society that will offer forays and other learning opportunities. Also growing mushrooms outside your door step is a good way to have them readily available and to learn to recognize them when you do see them in the a wild environment.

    Incorporating mushrooms into your diet is fun and easy. Add them to soup, stew, stir fry vegetables, omellete, quiche and/or stuff them. Use your imagination I suspect you can think of many other ideas as well!  One of the mushrooms that is abundant this year is the Giant Puff Ball mushroom. From the perspective of a chef, this mushroom is all in the sauce. It takes on the flavor of whatever you marinate or cook it in. Below is one of my favorite recipes for preparing this unmistakable, generous mushroom.


    In order to develop recipes for this mushroom you can think of them as a soft tofu. I like to marinate them and bake them. Once they are baked, I then broil or grill them and/or put them in the freezer for later us.
    Usually when I do this I have several baking pans full of sliced puff ball “steaks”, which I then either eat as a mushroom burger, eat as a main course with vegetables and /or cut into small pieces and add to a stir fry.
    Often when you find one giant puff ball there are many more. If you find many you can freeze them and eat then throughout the year! Below is my recipe for Mushroom “steaks”.




    Puff Ball Mushroom “Steaks”

    ~Harvest one or more giant puff ball mushrooms (Calvatia gigantea.) If you are unsure about identifying mushrooms, a good book for beginning mushroom identification is Start Mushrooming by Stan Tekila.
    ~Wipe off the outside of the mushroom and check to be sure the inside is white and smooth and that it does not have insect damage inside.
    ~slice into slabs approximately ¼-1/2 inch thick and place in a large baking pan.
    ~marinate in the mixture listed below, or your favorite rich barbeque or steak sauce for 30 minutes. Be sure the marinade is covering all sides of the mushroom. *see marinade recipe below.
    ~preheat oven to 325 degrees
    ~place the baking dish in the oven and bake for 30-40 minutes.
    ~You can do several things next:
    1.place in a storage container and let cool. Once they are cool, freeze for future use.
    2.Eat directly as a “steak” and/or cut in pieces and add to a stir fry or other vegetable dish.
    3.Broil or grill and eat as a grilled “steak” or place on a roll to create a mushroom burger.
    Marinate recipe:
    Cranberry Sauce or other tart sauce 1 cup (I like high bush cranberry sauce)
    2 TBS mustard
    ½ cup tamari
    ¼ cup olive oil
    ¼ cup miso (barley miso is nice, as it is quite rich, but any miso will work)



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Friday, October 11, 2013 11:35 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Preventing Prenatal Depression
    Dr. Jill Diana Chasse


    Prenatal Depression is a serious issue that often gets overlooked by both women and their healthcare providers. Depression during pregnancy not only causes sadness for the mother, it can also have significant developmental effects in the fetus, including altering of the baby's brain structure leading to increased vulnerability for mood disorders in the child's future. Additionally, depression during pregnancy may cause early delivery and a preterm baby.

    One of the main determinants of depression during pregnancy, although it is often ignored or not given the attention it deserves, is stress. Stress can be cultural, environmental, or social. A parent may give an adult child a hard time for having a child with a spouse they disapprove of, society may disapprove of a lesbian mother's choice to carry a child, co workers may belittle a single mom for being artificially inseminated, etc, all leading to environmental and social stress. There are religious prejudices and lifestyle issues as well as heredity and personal choice such as where to birth and who to have as a practitioner. Stress not only has an effect on the mother, raising blood pressure, causing headaches and digestive problems and of course mental health issues such as anxiety and depression. It also directly related to the child's development. More stress correlates to less synapses, potentially stunting brain development or leading to behavioral issues and disorders.

    SO what is the best way to avoid stress, decrease the chance of prenatal depression and increase a healthy and safe pregnancy and birth? The answer lies with both the mom and her care provider. It should be a team effort of respect, understanding and strong communication.

    First preparing for the emotionally for baby is just as important as physically. Get to know the child growing inside you, talk about your worries, fears and apprehensions with friends and loved ones, knowing it is normal to have concerns. Also pay attention to your physical habits and stay active with a healthy diet. This significantly reduces stress and tension.

    You should also talk to your provider about your feelings. Not all care providers understand mental health issues. Some pregnancy care providers discuss emotional and psychological issues with their moms, test for signs of prenatal depression and regularly refer out if more support is needed. Other providers reflect strong stigma with mental health issues or have misunderstandings, assuming that depression is more prevalent in the postpartum period so they avoid discussions and ignore the signs. Educating providers is key in reducing stress and depression. It is important that all pregnancy care providers have a thorough understanding and respect for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, and understand how to recognize and either treat or refer when symptoms present.

    If depressive symptoms are identified, getting treatment is still an issue. There are many barriers and obstacles that pregnant women face including treatment location and options as well as personal concerns about embarrassment, weakness or mental illness stigma. Understanding that depression is not a sign of weakness or or sign of a bad parent is extremely important. A mother's strength actually reflects in her ability to admit the need and reach out. We are all just human and it's okay to ask for help.

    Depression during pregnancy is a serious issue that warrants better attention, focus and care. Our children deserve healthy physical and emotional environments to develop in, and our mothers deserve support. Support yourself, your baby, and your family by understanding this mental health issue and reaching out if needed.




    Dr. Jill Diana Chasse is maternal/child public health practitioner, an author and a counselor. Jill has been working with the mother-baby dyad in birth and psychology for over 20 years.

    She has studied midwifery at both Ancient Arts Midwifery Institute and Institute of Holistic Midwifery, holds Master's degrees in Psychology and Public Administration, and a Doctorate in Health Administration.  

    Personally, she loves the ocean, skiing, horseback riding, and cuddling up with her kids, hot coffee and a good book in front of a fireplace on a snowy evening.

    Currently, she works in public health for the federal government and teaches classes for the Childbearing Year at Wise Woman University, online, including the childbirth education method she founded, BEBE- Baby-Empowered Birthing Education.


    Listen to a 30 minute radio interview with Jill Diana Chasse


     
    Study with Jill Diana Chasse Online

    ~ Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support ~
      ( link to detailed description of Pregnancy and Postpartum Mental Health Support )

    Manage pregnancy and postpartum emotional challenges including baby blues and PPD symptoms to help reduce the risk of depression and keep yourself and your baby mentally and emotionally strong.  REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE - Baby Empowered Birth Education ~
    ( link to detailed description of BEBE )

    Baby-Empowered Birth Education is a Complimentary Natural Childbirth method for use with or without medications, at home, birth center, or in a hospital with key concepts of "Experiencing, Understanding and Enjoying" your labor and delivery through emotional support, empowering yourself, and empowering your baby. REGISTER HERE


    ~ BEBE Childbirth Educator Certification Program ~
      ( link to detailed description of BEBE for Educators )

    Become a "Baby-Empowered Birthing Education" Certified Childbirth Educator offering women and babies an empowering, magical, enlightening, and passionate natural choice for childbirth education, encouraging them to "experience, understand and enjoy" the Magic of Motherhood! REGISTER HERE
     

    This is an online workshop intended for parents who have lost a baby during pregnancy or after birth. It is a self paced, guided tour through the healing process to work through grief and bereavement issues. Working through these issues in this format is especially helpful in the early stages of grief when the shock and pain is still raw.
    REGISTER HERE



    Baby Magic for your Magic Baby
    By Jill Diana Chasse




    Baby Magic is a Spiritual Guide to Motherhood. Beginning before conception, Baby Magic guides a woman on her magical journey of becoming a mother.

    ~ORDER HERE~

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