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  • Wednesday, October 08, 2014 2:08 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Finding the Power Within ~ Aries Super Full Moon

    by Kathy Crabbe


    It’s the Aries Full Moon on Oct. 8th and it’s gonna be intense so, as usual I’ve channeled a Creative Soul Challenge based upon a card chosen from my Creative Soul Deck along with a Gemstone Healing Song to be sung by the light of the full moon. I’ve also channeled a Creative Soul Body Challenge which I’ll be sharing with my Creative Soul Circle; my Facebook group that you are welcome to join.


    Full Moon in Aries ~ October 8, 2014 ~ 3:50 am Pacific time


    Creative Soul Challenge ~ How to find the power within


    Whether we have power, are seeking power or are power-less; we all have the power of choice. Will we choose life or death? And if death chooses us, do we choose to die gracefully or kicking and screaming; resisting every step of the way?


    No path or choice is inherently right or wrong; it’s your choice. So how can you be of service to others who are making hard choices?


    This Aries Full Moon we are being challenged to examine one hard choice we’ve had to make that felt out of our control and to ask ourselves: “Why did it feel that way?”


    Let yourself meditate upon this choice for a while before responding. Then write out a strong affirmative statement proclaiming all you’ve learned and been blessed with due to making this hard choice.


    Full Moon in Aries Healing Gemstone: Fire Opal


    fire opalSong of the Fire Opal

    My love is in bloom

    for You for You

    I pray to La Lune

    for You for You

    I sing this tune

    for You for You

    My breath, my heart, my soul, my gifts

    for You for You

    I am transfixed

    for You for You

    transformed

    for You for You

    Blessed to Be

    for You for You

    just me

    more me

    me me meeeeeeeeee…


    Take a look now at the intentions you set at the New Moon (Sept. 23). How have they blossomed? If you didn’t set intentions, what is coming to fruition for you right now?


    With this Full Moon occulting (very very close to) Uranus and trining Uranus, Mars and Jupiter along with a Lunar Eclipse and Mercury Retrograde, we are stripping away facades, going deep within and seeking inner truths about ourselves and our creative fire.


    How can “Fin”, this month’s Full Moon card assist you with that? Ask Fin right now.


    Fin by Kathy Crabbe (Creative Soul Card)


    Creative Soul Card: Fin


    Fin’s Song


    This is the end, my friend

    This Tall Tale ends here

    with you

    You, who are brave and true

    You

    who stand tall and true

    You

    who chooses to be true

    to you, you, you.





    Creative Soul Suggestions for your Circle from my Goddess Zodiac Book

    • Element: fire
    • Color: red
    • Gemstone: amethyst, diamond, fire opal, garnet
    • Plant/Tree: aloe, dandelion, holly, mustard, thistle
    • Herb/Spice: broom, cayenne pepper, garlic
    • Food: onion, pepper, radish, rhubarb
    • Animal Spirit: ram, red hawk
    • Tarot Card: Empress, Emperor
    • Goddess: Amazon, Fuji, Kali, Sekhmet, Valkyries




    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, educator and writer who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, online resources, Divine Feminine eClasses and Creative Soul Readings infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy's work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, magazine and books. She maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and Etsy Shop.

    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen's University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, Herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.

    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell's Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Learn more here.
  • Tuesday, September 30, 2014 6:44 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    HEALING THE WOUNDED MASCULINE


    Written & Illustrated by Roslyne Sophia Breillat

    The patriarchy that currently rules our outer world apparently seems to be ruling this world from a place of masculine power. And yet true masculine power does not arise from corruption, force, greed and the desire to dominate, control and destroy of the distorted masculine. True masculine power arises from a centered inner place of masculine authority, straightness, truth, clarity and strength and the desire to protect, sustain and build of the pure masculine.

    The forceful ways now dominating the world and the Earth arise from the core of the wounded man, for it is not only women and children who are wounded by living within the disturbing imbalances of a male dominated world. His wound has isolated and separated him from love, from the nurturing and powerful womb of the Earth, from his desire for true brotherhood, from his love of nature and from his love of the feminine, within and without. And when he lives in such isolation and separation, he becomes violent, cruel, controlling and afraid. Instead of protecting the women and children of his family, his home, his community, his tribe, his country, he goes to war with himself, he denies his true nature, he loses his humbleness, his humility and his innate ability to live harmoniously in union with this beloved Earth Mother as a true spiritual warrior, a true and peaceful and loving man.

    And so he wanders, restless, lost and afraid, his face a hardened mask of controlled determination, amidst the alleys, laneways, streets and highways of contemporary society, listening to his mind, alienated from his heart. And so he sits, for long, long hours, staring into the distorted reality of cyberspace, losing his power and his authority within the delusions and illusions of his myriad techno realm inventions, moving ever faster, moving ever deeper, into his thoughts, away from his body and away from his naturally grounded place upon this Earth.

    And so the feminine weeps, rages, roars, as she moves ever deeper into the deep, silent well of her wisdom, her power, her depth, her love, calling him home to his true place with her, with the Earth, with his love. And many beautiful, wonderful men are hearing her call, hearing the call of the feminine and of the Earth, yearning to live once again from the true power of their strength, their authority, their truth. And yet many men do not hear the vibrance, the passion, the sweetness of this call, for they are unable to listen, to hear, to see what they are doing to themselves, to the feminine, to the Earth.

    We cannot live in harmony in this world until these wounds are healed, until the wild beauty, feminine power and peace filled wisdom of the Earth are honored, sustained, supported, nurtured, protected, loved, every moment, for we, masculine and feminine, live within Her and She lives within us, as one, as wholeness, as truth.


    Copyright ~ Roslyne Sophia Breillat ©

    Not to be reproduced without written permission of the author..

    Sophia is a wise woman who lives, writes, and paints from the heart. Her prolific articles and paintings

    embrace the wisdom and grace of the female essence and the beauty of the Earth. She is acknowledged as a powerful and courageous writer whose creative work features in many international websites and magazines. Her website is an abundant offering of female wisdom that nurtures and inspires. Sophia is the author and illustrator of two books, WOMB OF WISDOM, THE SACRED JOURNEY OF MENOPAUSE and HEART OF THE EARTH, NURTURING THE SACRED FEMININE




    Sophia (Roslyne Sophia Breillat) is a woman who lives, writes and paints from the heart. The inner richness and profound healing of her life experiences are inspiration for her flowing creativity.

    Her articles and art embrace the beauty, power and sensuality of the feminine essence and celebrate the natural flow of woman's transformational cycles. Her website offers a sacred space for woman to dive into the deep, to open to her true nature, to be who she really is.

    Sophia's training and experience includes primal therapy, intuitive massage, reconnective healing, writing, art and design, astrological counselling, instructional skills, training program design and teaching within the Aboriginal community. She has also facilitated many creative and inspiring workshops and courses.
     

    Sophie offers two courses at the Wise Woman University:


    ~ Being Woman ~ (detailed description of Being Woman online course)


    This six week online course provides a sacred and nurturing space where woman can learn to surrender more deeply to the natural receptivity of the female psyche. "...so blessed to have had gentle words of encouragement and support from you through the "Being Woman" course at W.W.U.... You have inspired me to continue my quest... Thanks so much!"

    ~ Dawning of Wisdom ~ (detailed description of Dawning of Wisdom online course)

    Throughout this series of lessons she will learn to trust the innate flow of her intuitive nature and to listen more intimately to the wellspring of her inner source. And we will explore together how to live more fully as the embodiment of the feminine essence within the structures of a masculine civilisation. "I LOVE your class, it is beautiful and thought provoking and well done... Thank you Sophia for your role as wisdom keeper, confidante and mentor."

  • Thursday, September 25, 2014 9:54 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    You, Luna, Universe: Part Two

    by Lisa Sarasohn
    lisa@loveyourbelly.com

    © 2014 Self-Health Education




    As I wrote last month, I learned about The Moon and You: A Woman's Guide to an Easier Monthly Cycle when the author, Barbara Hanneloré, told me she'd selected words from The Woman's Belly Book for her own book's page one. The Moon and You provides an excellent resource for herbalists to use with their clients as a practical handbook for healing pre-menstrual and menstrual distress.


    Added to the pleasure of knowing that The Woman's Belly Book has provided inspiration and support for Barbara's The Moon and You, two threads of interest wrap me up and draw me to this book.


    The first is that providing ways to relieve pre-menstrual and menstrual distress in the context of cultural awareness may be the most direct route for women moving toward honoring the pro-creative power our bellies shelter. 


    The second regards Barbara’s suggestion, in the section titled "Caring for Your Inner Life," to observe the moon's phases as a way to immerse yourself in the relationship between your menstrual cycle and the moon's cycle. She continues: "The moon's cycle is a natural calendar. It was the first calendar...."


    The notion that the moon's cycle was the first calendar has rich implications. As I wrote a few years ago in A New Cosmology: Women’s Bodies Encode What Humankind Needs To Know,


    Astronomical evidence indicates that women’s bodies code the way the world works. Our volumes and curves, our rhythms and cycles, replicate the structure and function of the universe. Beginning with the correspondence between menstrual and lunar cycles, continuing to planetary orbits and beyond, we embody the mathematical relationships implicit in universal principles of time and space.


    How's that for an idea that might change the basis for women's body image -- or, better said, our body confidence?


    Those words encapsulate what I'd learned from reading articles written by and interviewing meterologist Bart Jordan. (A "meterologist" is one who studies measure.)


    Bart's research informs much of The Curse: A Cultural History of Menstruation, written by Janice Delaney, Mary Jane Lupton, and Emily Toth (University of Illinois Press; revised edition, 1988). In particular, they reference "Early Calendrical Art Recreated: A Partial Catalogue,” New England Antiquities Research Association Journal (NEARA) 19, nos. 1, 2 (Summer/FaIl 1984): 1-13 and "Deciphering the Distant Past,” Publick OccurrencesMay 17, 1974, pp. 12-13.


    In the conclusion to The Curse, the authors write that Bart's work demonstrates:


    At least thirty thousand years ago, and perhaps 300 thousand years ago, human beings on this planet were measuring the movement of the stars and planets with a sophisticated system that emanated from, and mathematically depended upon, the human menstrual cycle.

    [Bart Jordan has arrived] at diagrams and symbols based on the 364-day year of 13 moon cycles, the 280-day human gestation period, and the 584-day transit of the planet Venus around the sun...to find, time and again, that the diagrams already existed on the carved tusks, stone earth goddesses (such as the Venus of Lespuges), and other manifestations of what had been believed to be the artistic expressions of a primitive and preliterate people.


    We have seen his drawings and examined the evidence of the archeological finds, only to agree with the staggering fact he is trying to introduce into current scientific thinking.


    What is this staggering fact?


    The Ice Age "art" that is commonly displayed, and the even earlier "art" known to paleontologists and other specialists, is really Ice Age "science." The ancients, the Cro-Magnon ancestors of our human race, were not scratching pretty designs onto their reindeer tusks or fashioning grotesque models of the female form to give vent to their need to make art. They were, in fact, recording their scientific observations on the way the moon and planets and their own earth went through the phases of the year and using the menstrual clock of the women of the society as the observable data from which to draw. 


    They continue:


    Crucial to Jordan's calculations is the difference between the lunar and menstrual calendars. The real lunar calendar, he says, counting the nights when the moon is "dark," is 29.5 days. But the calculations evident in the carved tusks and obese goddesses reflect a calendrical notation of 28 days, and its multiple, 280, the human gestation period. Menstrual averaging was not unknown to our Cro-Magnon ancestors, Jordan believes, and it was this sophistication that enabled them to create symbols in their art (such as the early Greek meander) that were actually representations of the movement of time as measured by the female body clock and its numerical connection to the travels of Venus around the sun. 


    The writers also remark:


    While Bart Jordan's work is entirely original, additional evidence that menstrual calendars were the basis of time measurement in the early Chinese, Mayan, Gaelic, Roman, Aryan, Babylonian, Chaldean, Greek, Egyptian, and pre-Christian European societies is presented in Barbara Walker's The Woman's Encyclopedia of Myths and Spirits (New York, Harper & Row, 1983), pp. 645-49. Walker even notes that the Romans' word for calculation of time is mensuration, or knowledge of the menses, and that the Gaelic words for menstruation and calendar are the same.


    Barbara Hanneloré has given us The Moon and You with a tag line, indicating the benefit that she and her book are promising: Discover your own Inner Rhythms and Take Loving Care of Yourself.


    The book delivers on its promise. What's more, it just might lead us to knowing, in our bones and in our blood, that our woman-body and our woman-being are as sacred as the universe is infinite.



    ***************************************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!

    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~
  • Thursday, September 18, 2014 2:11 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    *Acorn: The Forgotten Nut*
    by Linda Conroy




    Foraging is a lifeway for us and we take every opportunity to harvest. This past week we are harvesting as well as processing some of our fall harvest.
    One of the nuts we harvested in October are acorns. We harvested them here in Wisconsin as well as when we traveled to Kansas for the Mother Earth News Fair. 

    The acorns from Kansas are more than twice the size of the nut here in Wisconsin. So we were very excited, as the larger acorns ultimately mean more yield for us! We have to date put up 30lbs of Acorn flour! We are still processing them, so more to come. This will be our predominant flour for the winter.

    Many people do not think of these as nuts, which is why I call them the forgotten nut. Most people see them as food for squirrels. And while they indeed are food for other critters we can eat them too!

    Oak trees can produce large amounts of acorns. Harvesting and processing them before the weevils turn them into a powdery dust and render them inedible is one of the keys to ending up with delicious flour.

    Historically acorns were an important important food source to North American indigenous people. They were as important as many grains are today.

    Acorns are nutritionally dense, containing protein, minerals, vitamins and fiber.  Acorns have also been tested and shown to have the potential for controlling blood sugar levels.

    In order for humans to ingest this nut the tannins need to be leached out of them. Tannins are organic substances, which occur in plant tissues.
    Tannins in small amounts are not harmful, but in large quantities they can upset your stomach and promote dehydration. Plus they taste bitter and thus make the nut initially unappetizing.

    If you are interested in processing acorns or at least seeing how we process them you can watch our new youtube video below put together by our very own John Holzwart. Thanks John!

    http://youtu.be/T_4Zc55iIEo?list=UUCbOsbgXBghT_eZPJp0EOkg

    We will be adding the flour to many of the dishes we prepare over the next few months, including acorn soup.

    Below is a recipe for this delicious soup. For other recipes, enjoy being creative and introducing acorn flour wherever flour is called for. If you would like your baked item to rise you will need to add something that has a leavening agent, whether it be glutenous flour or some other rising medium.

    I like to use Eikorn wheat for bread and muffins. For flat bread, pie crust and crackers you do not need to add these as there is no need for rising.

    The nut meat of Acorns can be used as is. I have made a chili style dish, added them to tomato sauce in place of meat and simply toasted them and put them on top of salads. As with all wild edibles use your taste buds, imagination and creativity!

    *Acorn Soup Recipe*

    ~Boil in broth cut up carrots and onions until tender (you can use any
    broth, I like to make a rich bone broth, but a chicken, vegetable or
    mushroom broth will work well.

    ~Add ground acorns, dry or wet and simmer for 10 minutes

    ~In the meantime, sautee oil with powdered wild ginger (if you don’t have
    wild ginger you can add cultivated ginger)

    ~Add the boiled vegetables to the sautee pan. Simmer for 20 minutes

    ~Place all of this in a food processor and/or blender. Blend until smooth



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Tuesday, September 09, 2014 3:16 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    The Tree Pose Vrksasana

    by Sheryl Wolover






    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl
    http://www.pacific-elements.com/


  • Friday, September 05, 2014 1:29 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Dream & Dance & Heal: Full Moon in Pisces

    By Kathy Crabbe


    It’s almost the Full Moon in that most mystical, magical, and spiritually inclined sign of the zodiac; Pisces so I decided to choose a card from my Creative Soul Deck and to sleep with it under my pillow while requesting Dream Guidance and Insights from Mama Moon & the Divine.


    Creative Soul Card for the Full Moon in Pisces

    Guess poet by Kathy Crabbe

    Guess poet by Kathy Crabbe


    Creative Soul Card: Guess -poet-


    Affirmation: I dream the Divine in everything.


    This is the dream, the dream called life and you are in the middle of it.

    As if we know exactly what we’re doing here…well, we don’t, but by tuning into Mama Moon we open our hearts creatively as we spoon feed ourselves the nourishment we crave, oh that we crave so dearly.


    moonstone sphereMoonstone Meditation & Song


    A Meditation to be sung or said aloud under the light  of the Full Moon *shared with my Creative Soul Circle ~ all are welcome to join this group on Facebook at no cost.


    Creative Soul Challenge


    I invite you to join my Creative Soul Circle and Sing the Song of the Moonstone together with your fellow Moon Musers as you catch your first glimpse of Mama Moon; full in Pisces on September 8th.

    At this time Mama Moon is joined in the sky by Chiron, the planetoid (?) of wounded healers.


    Where have you been wounded?


    How will you release that wound by the light of the Full Moon?


    You know the way. You ARE guided. Allow the mystical glow and guidance of this Full Moon to cleanse you and shower your dreams with new visions and old visions re-visioned anew.


    Then dance, dance, dance in your heart for you are free.


    And Guess -poet- always encourages poetry so be open to receiving pearls of wisdom in unexpected ways.


    For Your Pisces Full Moon Altar


    Color: lavender
    Gemstone: moonstone
    Herb: chicory
    Food: cucumber
    Animal Spirit: fish
    Goddess: Nix


    Color: green
    Gemstone: sapphire
    Herb: valerian
    Food: oats
    Animal Spirit: cat
    Goddess: Changing Woman – See more at: http://www.kathycrabbe.com/#sthash.nmKNfUQc.dpuf

    Last but not least, take a look back at the intentions you set at the New Moon on August 25th and ask yourself what’s flowered for you since then.


    Blessed Be.





    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, educator and writer who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, online resources, Divine Feminine eClasses and Creative Soul Readings infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy's work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, magazine and books. She maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and Etsy Shop.

    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen's University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, Herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.

    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell's Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Learn more here.
  • Thursday, August 21, 2014 2:00 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Thistle Farms: The Business of Herbal Healing
    by Lisa Sarasohn



    You could call Thistle Farms an herbal body care company. A business in Nashville, TN that makes and sells lip balms and body butters. An online marketplace. A distributor placing its own products with hundreds of retailers, including Whole Foods stores in the South and Mid-Atlantic regions. A start-up whose sales have topped $1 million in less than 15 years.


    You'd be right on all counts.


    Even more than a body care company, Thistle Farms includes an eatery called the Thistle Stop Café and two craft studios. Products such as greeting cards, gift tags, and bookmarks feature paper hand-crafted with thistle flower inclusions.


    What makes Thistle Farms remarkable, in addition to its profitability, is its charter as a social enterprise. Thistle Farms' mission is its workers.


    The Workforce


    Thistle Farms workers are bright, resourceful, resilient women who've survived prostitution, trafficking, addiction, and homelessness. They're current residents and recent graduates of Magdalene, Thistle Farms' sister organization. Magdalene provides longterm housing, food, medical and dental treatment, drug rehab, therapy, and education without charging residents a cent or receiving government funding. Thistle Farms provides opportunities for job training and paid employment.



    The Brand And The Mission


    As an herb, "thistle" applies to a family of plants, the Asteraceae, known for their tough and prickly leaves, their feathery crowning flower. Susun Weed notes that the healing properties of thistles pertain to liver function and lactation.


    Thistle Farms incorporates the plant into its brand as a symbol of survival in harsh circumstances and the will to thrive:

    Thistles grow on the streets and alleys where residents and graduates of Magdalene walked. Considered weeds, thistles have a deep root that can shoot through concrete and survive drought. In spite of their prickly appearance, their royal and soft purple center makes the thistle a mysterious and gorgeous flower. Being a Thistle Farmer means the world is our farm and that we choose to love all creation.



    Written into the company's mission statement, emblazoned wherever the words will fit, is this declaration: Love is the most powerful force in the world for change.


    Thistle Farms tags all its products and services concisely: "Love heals."


     



    The Benefits


    Many cycles of giving and receiving infuse the products that the Magdalene women make and sell through Thistle Farms. Many dimensions of healing infuse the process that links worker with buyer.


    Customers can enjoy the healing properties of the products' herbal ingredients. At the same time, they can take satisfaction in supporting women who are so radically healing their lives.


    The Facility


    More than a thousand people from more than a hundred cities have visited Magdalene and Thistle Farms during the past two years, eager to see what makes the residential program and the business enterprise so successful.


    One of about fifty visitors, I spent a day at Thistle Farms last spring.


    I have to tell you: Love is the reality of the place, but it's not the cuddly kind of love. It's the kind of love that's fierce moment-to-moment presence. Hard-earned, razor's edge, breath-by-breath presence. What emerges when you've been knee-deep in death and choose to step through it into life.


    Becca Stevens

    Magdalene women toured us through one of the program's houses, the manufacturing facilities, the craft studios. We gathered in the Thistle Stop Café for a morning meditation with the enterprise's employees and an afternoon discussion with Becca Stevens, Magdalene's founder and Thistle Farms' Executive Director.

     



    Globalization


    Becca spoke of Thistle Farms' partnerships with social enterprises in Africa and South America that are helping women rebuild their lives in the wake of poverty and violence. Manufacturing its insect repellent spray, for example, Thistle Farms incorporates the geranium oil produced by widows and orphans who've survived the Rwandan genocide.


    Taking this initiative further, Thistle Farms is convening a worldwide coalition of social enterprises that employ marginalized women and promote their economic freedom. Called Shared Trade, this coalition is designed to promote business development on a cooperative basis.


    Shared Trade will launch at "Roots: Digging Deep & Growing Hope," the national conference Thistle Farms is hosting October 12-14.

     

    In The Mix



    Mix a global partnership of woman-empowering enterprises with the plant world's healing properties and what do you get?


    Love heals. Love is good business.



     

    © 2014 Self-Health Education, Inc.

     



    **************************************************************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!

    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~

  • Thursday, August 14, 2014 3:08 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Happy Aquarius Full Moon:

    I quiet my outside so my inner voice can be heard

    By: Kathy Crabbe


    The affirmation and image in this post is from my soon to be released Creative Soul Deck and Class and was channeled by me for this Aquarius Full Moon. I have included a snippet from the Creative Soul Activity that accompanies it below. There is also a gemstone healing meditation that I channeled and will be sharing in my Creative Soul Circle, a private group on Facebook. Please email me if you’d like to join.

    Affirmation: Shush! I quiet my outside so my inner voice can be heard. And I open up to touch the core of me-ness.

    It’s the lunar lammas and the first harvest (in the northern hemisphere, that is), but because it’s a lunar celebration which happens this Sunday at the Full Moon in Aquarius (August 10 at 11:09 am PDT) this celebration is about our inner harvest.

    What feeds you? What keeps you going and fulfills you?  Is this a part of your daily work or play or even your dreams at night?

    Mummy (Creative Soul Card) by Kathy Crabbe

    Quick, the fairies are calling you; can you see that flash of light, that wee sprite, out of the corner of your eye?  She is calling your name.

    You are the mummy now; the mummy of your own inner dreams. Take time out to acknowledge yourself.

    Take time out for you.

    Wrap yourself up like a mummy, in protective layers so that YOU, yes YOU can hear your own thoughts without distraction.

    Allow the Divine to speak through you, trusting that the advice she has for you is going to be good for all of us.

    Allow the group mind, the myriad of voices, the universal, co-creative, collective consciousness to speak through you by listening to your heart and soul at this Full Moon in Aquarius.

    Allow this Full Moon to fill your soul with light for you are love and all you touch is loved.

    Aquarius Full Moon Delites for your altar 

    • Divine image: the Sphinx
    • Color: black
    • Stone: chrysocolla
    • Element: air
    • Plant: orchid
    • Herb: pepper
    • Food: dried fruits
    • Goddess: Freya, Ix Chel, Nut

    Song

    I am I am I am

    A walker between worlds

    I am nourished, sustained, enthralled

    by love of the ALL

    I seek first within

    My duty calls

    More about the upcoming Creative Soul Class & Certification Program

    If you like what you see here you will probably enjoy my upcoming Creative Soul Class which will include these goodies:

    • Play and draw using your non dominant hand
    • Make your own Creative Soul deck
    • Learn how to stay focused and on track with your goals and dreams
    • Set intentions for the month ahead at the New Moon
    • Circle with your fellow Moon Musers and Creative Souls in a private group
    • Work towards Creative Soul Guide Certification and teach classes online or in person





    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, educator and writer who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, online resources, Divine Feminine eClasses and Creative Soul Readings infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy's work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, magazine and books. She maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and Etsy Shop.

    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen's University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, Herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.

    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell's Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Learn more here.
  • Thursday, July 31, 2014 1:21 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Elements of an Engaging Presentation/Workshop
    by Linda Conroy
    www.moonwiseherbs.com
    Written for Herbalists, Permaculturists and others interested in creating an earth centered experience for themselves and participants!
     
    Presentations and workshops are not always simple experiences. We bring our own feelings and needs to the experience and participants bring theirs as well. When you are presenting keep in mind that the ultimate goal is to focus on connecting your intent and the needs of the participants as closely as possible. In other words connection is the ultimate goal.
    I have made (inadvertently I might add), my living teaching workshops and classes for two decades. I teach often and in many diverse places. Some examples would be gardening events, herbal conferences, women’s groups, kids camps, local food events, permaculture programs, sustainability events & fairs and many other events. I have learned a lot over the years. I am also one of the organizers for The Midwest Women’s Herbal Conference. I have had the unique opportunity of developing the programs. I have also had the opportunity to consolidate feedback from participants as well as evaluate recordings of the presentations. What I have discovered is that not everyone is comfortable presenting, nor have they developed the skills to offer an engaging presentation.
    I have written this article in hopes that it will contribute to the growing population of herbalists who are interested in sharing the wisdom they have and/or are discovering. And really this information can be useful for anyone who wants to present to the public on issues of natural health, permaculture and/or personal growth.
    Here is exactly what I want to hear following a presentation:
    “I was in one of your classes (cheese-making weekend class), and I did learn a lot about making cheese. The most engaging thing, though, was your knowledge and how you presented it….there was never a dull moment….it takes a special teacher to pass on so much information in such an enthusiastic, interesting way!
    This testimonial gives me the feedback that the 20 years I have spent developing teaching skills has rendered results. It does not always follow that because we know about a subject, we can run a program or effective learning experience. In order to be effective imparting information and/or sharing wisdom, there are specific skills that need to be developed in order to teach and/or run a training.
    I have spent as much time learning about herbs, food and health, as I have taking singing classes and learning about communication. I also have taught at least several times a month, sometimes several times a week. As they say, practice makes perfect. While I am not trying to be perfect I am attempting to be effective and to help people remember the information that is being imparted. I have also chosen to study with people who are experienced instructors, both herbalists and those in other disciplines.
    I have been teaching successful herbal, wild food, traditional food, women’s health and communication workshops across the continental United States for 20 years. Prior to that time, I worked as a social worker, working with individuals and facilitating groups.  I have attended a wide array of workshops during that time as well. I have found there are elements that can create the most conducive learning environment. I also am committed to offering my audience, not only a presentation, but an experience.
    The following are some of the guidelines I use to facilitate workshops that create an enjoyable and engaging experience for both the participant and myself as the instructor.
    The first thing, before you teach or create your outline, ask yourself:
    Do I care about the subject matter?
    Do I have personal experience to share on this topic?
    Do I feel confident in my knowledge to offer the type/length of presentation I am proposing?
    If you do not care much about the subject and/or you don’t know a lot about it, you may want to reconsider and find someone else to present the material. An example, I attended an edible landscaping workshop recently. The person was not engaged and really did not know very much about the edible aspect of what he was suggesting gardeners plant and grow in their yards/gardens. This was discouraging and to be blunt extremely boring. I suggested that my partner who is passionate about this topic teach it at the same event the following year. He did and received rave reviews. When he teaches this topic, he brings passion and experience in both growing the plants as well as preparing them for food.
    The following are some suggestions that can help you develop skills and to create a strong container for the classes and programs that you offer.  
    Ahead of time:
    Prepare notes and an outline. When I first began teaching I would create a very thorough outline, with time frames. I would indicate for myself how much time I would spend on each topic. This is helpful, even if you don’t stick to it 100%, it helps you choose which topics you may need to shorten as you move through your presentation.  For any new program I am offering I create an outline, and keep it on file. I review it before each presentation and make changes as needed.
    *It is advisable to have a plan and be willing to discard the plan if needed, than to not have a plan at all.
    Practice makes perfect…practice, practice, practice. Practice in front of a mirror, in front of friends and/or strangers if you can gather them and get them to pay attention. Practicing offers insights and helps you iron out any rough spots in your presentation. Practicing and asking for input from those listening, about what they enjoyed and what they might like to see done differently. Remember that these people are your teachers, don’t be offended or take it personally. Use feedback to continually shift and change your presentation, until it feels strong and fluid.  
    If you don’t have anyone to practice with in your immediate circle, join a group ie toastmasters or other group, that has the intention of helping people to improve their public speaking skills. Public speaking is a skill that needs to be developed. Just because you are passionate about a topic does not mean you will automatically be an engaging, effective presenter.
    Prepare oatstraw and drink throughout the class. This herb is incredibly grounding and helps to ease any anxiety or stress that you might be feeling. For anxiety, it is helpful to have motherwort or your favorite nevine on hand. I prefer oastraw and am amazed at how effective it is in providing a strong sense of calm and focus. Motherwort is my second choice, if I am not able to make an infusion.  Of course you can find an herbal nervine that works for you.  If ingesting a strong nervine or one that you have not taken before try very small amounts before you plan to present to be sure it provides the effect that you are looking for.
    If I am offering a program to a smaller group, I might even share an oatstraw infusion with the participants. This can bring us all into focus and contribute to a bond and connection from the beginning of the program.
    A. Beginning 
    1. Introduce yourself. Describe your experience and background as relevant to the material you will be presenting. If you have a personal experience with the material share it succinctly. Acknowledge your teachers and lineage, as herbalism is an oral tradition and it is important to speak to your teachers and lineage as a way to keep herbal traditions and heritages alive. Share a little bit about your personality and style. This helps to prepare participants for the experience. This is often the first impression participants have of you. This is also the place where you begin to establish rapport. Establishing rapport with a small or large group can be similar as well as different, either way you want to look a few people in the eye and smile, in a genuine way. Try to be professional, but friendly and engaging at the same time. This can be brief, but is worth putting some effort into. Practicing what you will say ahead of time and how you will say it, will make this go very smoothly.
    2.  Participant Introductions and/or Input.  Choose which of these is appropriate for the setting and the size of the group. Small groups can be invited to introduce themselves. I have found the best way to facilitate this is to offer a script for the information that you are wanting.
    For example: Tell us your name and 2 things you would like to take away from this class. Or what brought you here and what would you like to leave here with. Be up front asking participants not to take up more than the time you would like to allow. Remind them if they take a lot of time, that you will not be able to cover the material that you intend.
    For larger groups, you can ask for more general information from the participants.
    For example: How many nurses are in the group? How many of you are new to this topic or to overall subject matter? Ask them to call out a couple of things they would like covered during the presentation. 
    These two strategies are a great way to assess the group. You can gain information about participants level of understanding of the topic and to involve them in co-creating the experience. While it is good to have a plan for yourself and an agenda, it is also helpful to be flexible enough to include information that the group requests, if this is information that you did not plan on sharing. And If you aren’t able to  address their requests, they will feel most satisfied, if you can direct them to resources where they can gather the information.
    3.  Set the Stage. In order for a class to go well it is important to “set the stage”. To set the stage it is important to convey to participants what will be happening during your time together. This is basically a verbal outline of the class. This can be brief, but needs to communicate to participants what role they can play in the workshop process and what they can expect from you. Ie should they ask questions, should they wait until the end or will their not be time for questions etc.
    4. Create the container. The container is the energetic space that will be held during your time together. Every workshop, whether it is 1 hour long or several days to weeks, needs to have a beginning, middle and end. The beginning is what is listed above, introductions and setting the stage. These two elements, when done well create a solid container. When they are missing the workshop or event often feels disorganized to participants and can make or break a presentation, no matter how useful the material is.
    B. Middle. The middle is where the meat of the workshop/event happens. You will be sharing specific information about the topic here and engaging with the group. Depending on the topic and your style, you may or may not want to take questions during this time. When you set the stage, this is a good piece of information to share with the group. If you plan to leave time for questions at the end, let them know that. During this phase you may need to remind them that you will take questions at the end. If you are comfortable taking questions during your presentation, be sure that you have a strategy for bringing the discussion back to the main points you are trying to make. Allowing questions to derail a presentation is very frustrating to other participants who are interested in what you have to say.
    Having an outline for yourself can be helpful here, so that you don’t loose your train of thought. Be careful not to spend a lot of time looking at your outline, but do have it in viewing distance so you can access it as needed. Along these lines, if you are using a powerpoint for your presentation, be sure not to read the powerpoint word for word. This should just be a que for you to speak on your chosen topic. A powerpoint should be a launching point.
    C. End.  The end contains several elements.
    1. Leave time for questions and/or comments, if appropriate. This is the time for participants to ask questions and/or express a thought about the material. How much time you leave, will depend on how many questions and/or comments you would anticipate. 15 minutes in an hour-1 1/2 hour workshop should be plenty of time.
    2. Offer resources. This can alleviate the need for some questions. If the program is short, you may find that encouraging continued study and offering resources encourages participants the impetus to explore the topic on their own. You can offer a handout, or a couple of verbal resources as well. If you are doing a powerpoint presentation, offer a page with a few resources.
    *it is wise to offer presentations that are not power point based, even if occasionally. Relying on a powerpoint, takes away from creativity in the style of the presentation and if you ever arrive at a location and are not able to do your presentation via powerpoint, you want to be prepared. I offered presentations for many years without the support of a powerpoint program. As a result I am able to do any of my presentations with or without this technology.
    3. Offer a summary. Provide a short verbal synopsis of what you have covered. This will reinforce what you have shared and it will give an opportunity for participants to see the overall picture. It also offers closure and indicates that you are finished. If you are finished, and are in a location where other presenters are waiting to set up, be mindful and move to another location if you are going to continue taking questions. It is important that you do this, as those asking the questions will not take the initiative and you would want the same courtesy extended from other instructors. I often have a vendor booth at fairs where I present and will direct participants to my booth, where I am happy to have a continued dialogue.
    Additional notes:
    ~I often sing in the beginning of my workshops. This engages the audience, is playful and makes an energetic connection. I am comfortable doing this and perhaps not everyone will be. But doing something unusual and engaging, captures the attention of participants and creates a rapport right away. Other things you can do are to read poetry that reflects your topic, tell a joke and/or right away throw out an intriguing concept.
    ~Be sure you are dressed comfortably, so that you are not distracted by your clothing. This seems obvious, but if you are too hot/too cold, itchy or uncomfortable in any other way your presentation can be affected.
    ~Study different forms of communication. I like the nonviolent communication model developed by Marshall Rosenberg. His book is titled Nonviolent Communication. This information can support you in finding ways through difficult interactions. If you present long and often enough, you will find yourself in some interesting exchanges with people. It really helps to have some tools and skills in order to respond in a direct, but compassionate way. This itself takes continual practice. Learning to redirect people as well as set boundaries is an art. Seeking facilitation training is very helpful. Do not leave this to chance, as people have their own agenda and will highjack and/or sabotage your programs, even if unintentionally. Many people who attend talks on herbs and health are seeking information for their own issues and/or family members. They can loose sight of the fact that there are other people in the room and that you have information that you are planning to share. It is your role to help them remember this, in the most compassionate way possible. Sometimes, we may be seen as the heavy when we do this, but most people involved will be grateful. It is important to continually do your own personal growth work however you choose, so that you know yourself well and find the best approach for you.  
    ~Most of all have fun! Presenting is much like performing and the more fun you are having the more enjoyable it will be for your audience. If appropriate tell stories, find a joke that will be well received, share a piece of information that you found fascinating and/or other strategies for creating fun and keeping your audience engaged.  
    I do hope that this is helpful and contributes to your journey.
     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Friday, July 18, 2014 2:32 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    SOME MEDICINAL VALUES OF SEA SALT
    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    Sea salt is vital to our lives.
    In many ways, sea salt is a medicine. Salt is the strongest alkaline forming mineral. Along with other minerals it helps to create a strong resistance against infectious diseases, by keeping the blood slightly alkaline.


    Salt can remedy many diseases that are due to an overly acidic condition. This is extremely important when considering the acidic effects of most modern foods, such as refined flour, sugar, and processed meat. People reach instinctively for salt to help balance these acidic forming foods. However, it is too strong a medicine to be misused in this way, because too much salt can make the body hold onto fats, cause cardiovascular diseases, kidney and stomach problems, headaches, and hypertension. Mentally, the over use of salt can make us feel inflexible, tight and narrow-minded, as if emotions become sharp and hard as salt crystals.


    Salt stimulates the kidneys to do their job well, however, too much salt will require the body to take in more liquids. One of the kidneys' main functions is to cleanse the waste from the blood. If too much water is ingested, the kidneys main job becomes eliminating excess water and salt from the body. The toxins in the body then begin to build up. At this time, signs of an over-worked bladder and kidneys begin to appear, such as aching of the muscles, skin diseases and inflammation or pain in the lower back.


    Strangely enough, conditions similar to eating too much salt can be created when salt is eliminated from the diet. The kidneys, in their role of regulating the body's salt balance, produce a hormone which contracts the blood veins. This contraction causes excess stress on the heart and increases the blood pressure, and the body becomes tighter. These symptoms are normally associated with the use of too much salt. The kidneys then discharge very little urine, in an attempt to hold onto the body's salt supply, creating water retention in the tissues, similar to symptoms of excess salt.


    Traditional Ayurvedic medicine uses sea salt as an aid to digestion. The trace minerals in sea salt aid in the functioning of enzymes, and the breaking down of foods in the metabolism. Salt aids in the production of bile to break down fats, forms digestive juices in the stomach, stimulates the intestinal muscles, as well as the saliva production in the mouth.


    However salt in its raw state is difficult for the body to handle. It is much better for the body to assimilate salt when it is combined with other ingredients during cooking, or in seasonings. In this way the salt becomes easier to absorb , and is carried- along with the other nutrients deep into the inter-cellular fluids, where it helps these fluids to stay slightly alkaline, and promote healthy well functioning body cells.


    One of the traditional ways to eat salt in the orient is to season with tamari and miso or combine sea salt with sesame seeds in a condiment such as gomasio.


    Gomasio, or roasted sesame salt, is a salty slightly salty/bitter condiment. It is a much healthier way to add salt to foods at the table than the common way of sprinkling the meal with salt and pepper. Gomasio is particularly delicious on grains and vegetables. It is prepared by crushing sesame seeds together with sea salt so that the salt is well coated with the oil from the seeds. In this manner the oil buffers the effect of the salt in the digestive system, and enables it to be absorbed safely in the body. The proportions are usually 1:10 or 1:16, sea salt to sesame seeds.


    GOMASIO

    1 cup sesame seeds
    1 Tbsp sea salt


    Clean and rinse the seeds. Let them drain while roasting the salt on a dry skillet for a few minutes. Place the salt in a mortar or suribachi and grind until fine. Roast the seeds in a dry skillet until golden. They will give off a strong, delicious roasted aroma. Add the seeds to the salt and grind them together until the seeds are 50-70% crushed, using a gentle, rotating motion. Make sure the gomasio is cool before storing it in a jar with an airtight lid. Use gomasio as a condiment on grain and vegetable dishes.


    • Variation: Instead of sea salt, use roasted miso and dried, finely crushed herbs.




    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.



     



    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.





    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


     
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