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  • Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:57 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Inner Strength Required
    Pick a Card for the Aries Moon Jan. 12-14
    by Kathy Crabbe



    Mama Moon enters the Cardinal, Fire sign of Aries on Jan. 12 at 12:18 am Pacific time until Jan. 14.

    This is a Growth Moon-Time (waxing half moon) so get those intentions unwrapped and bring em to the table!

    This is not a particularly friendly Moon-Time with underlying currents of fuzzy un-quiet with a rather messy, emo re-adjustment period after the hullabaloo of the holidays has finally been shaken off. it’s down to business; inner strength REQUIRED.

    Why not pull an Elfin Ally Oracle card (above) to symbolize a new beginning or to ask a prying question about your moonth ahead. Murky Times call for Magical Intervention…right?! Look for the card REVEAL below. Make sure you’re subscribed to Daily Moon Vibes to get more card spreads & reveals emailed to you! 

    The Elfin Ally Oracle Deck
    by Kathy Crabbe
    Available in Spring 2019


    Aries Moon REVEAL



    Oracle Card 1: Pink Puss

    Keyword: Love
    Oracle Card Meaning: This is YOUR time, so make it special, make it count, for you are precious.
    Reversed: Why are you wasting your time?

    Oracle Card 2: Shiner Fish

    Keyword: Miracle
    Oracle: Your luck is changing and a stuck project starts to flow (again).
    Reversed: Your dreaminess is causing you to fall behind.

    Oracle Card 3: Dragon Luv

    Keyword: Beloved
    Oracle: A new beginning (or ending) awaits you.
    Reversed: False hope leads you nowhere.



    Kathy Crabbe has been an artist forever and a soul reader since awakening her intuitive gifts at age forty after five years painting with her non dominant left hand. This awoke her intuition in a big way. In 2008 she created a Lefty Oracle deck and started giving intuitive soul readings that have touched many lives in profound and playful ways. Kathy lives in sunny Southern California with her pet muses and architect husband in an adobe home they built themselves.

    Kathy’s art and writing has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazines and books including the San Diego Women’s History Museum, We’Moon Datebook, and Sawdust Art Festival in Laguna Beach to name a few. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and ecourses and maintains a regularly updated blog, etsy store and portfolio site. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992. Kathy has been an educator and mentor at Laguna Outreach Community Artists, Mt. San Jacinto College, Wise Woman University, Inspire San Diego Studio, HGTV, Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show as well as teaching her own classes: “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul”, and New Moon Circles. She is a founding member of the Temecula Artist’s Circle, the Temecula Writer’s Café and the Riverside Art Museum’s Printmaker’s Network. Metaphysically speaking, Kathy has studied with Francesca De Grandis (Third Road Celtic Faerie Shamanism), Adam Higgs (psychic mediumship), Om, devotee of Sri Chinmoy (meditation), Atma Khalsa (yoga), Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive), Joyce Fournier, RN (Therapeutic Touch), Steven Forrest & Jeffrey Wolf Green (astrology) and she received certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy.
    Learn more here.


    Kathy’s 4 week eClass “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul” is once again being offered at Wise Woman University so get ready to Moon Collage your heart out starting one week prior to the New Moon each month…more details here: eClass.
  • Monday, January 07, 2019 8:01 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Winter Medicine:
    An Overview of the Pantry and Medicine Chest

    By Linda Conroy
    www.moonwiseherbs.com
    www.midwestwomensherbal.com




    I live in a cold climate, where the winter months can be quite long.  Because fresh, local, wild food and herbs are not as readily in the winter months, I spend a lot of time during the fall months preparing food and medicine to have on hand for winter.  As I harvest and put up winter stores, I ask what might  I need for the upcoming months to keep myself, my family and my community healthy.  Of course this is a multi-layered question, requiring a range of responses. Preparing requires planning as well as action. In order to prepare I start by brainstorming  ways to stay healthy and strong as well as some of the winter ailments and issues that we have dealt with in the past. Below you will find a list of things you will find in our pantry as well as items found in our medicine chest. I hope these inspire you as you fill your pantry and medicine chest with nourishing food and herbal remedies.


    The Pantry
    Here a list of food items I like to have on hand so that we are stay healthy and strong. I am sure this list is not entirely complete, but it is the foundation for my winter food stores.


    ~Bones, lots of bones. We make bone broth quite often and either drink it or add it to the eternal winter stew pot. We also have venison and rabbit in the freezer, and the salmon our neighbor so generously shares with us, from their fishing trips.  


    ~Green vegetables, I like to freeze vegetables and wild greens so that I can continue to eat local and wild greens throughout the winter. We also water bath can tomato sauce, adding wild greens and mushrooms as well as seaweed and herbal vinegar to increase the nutrient density of the sauce. I also lacto ferment many a vegetable including cabbage, carrots, beets, kalhrabi, green beans, brussel sprouts and many more. Over the years I have fermented almost every vegetable that has crossed my path.


    ~Root vegetables, I like to store these in cold storage for as long as possible so that they can be eaten fresh. Beets I like to put in a vinegar brine and water bath can so we can eat them throughout the winter. I also lactoferment them. 


    ~Fruit, putting fruit and particularly berries in the freezer as well as canning them whole and in the form of sauces and jams and jellies. We also dry fruit either whole or in the form of fruit leather. Fruit leather is nice added in small pieces to homemade sourdough bread, but also just eating it is satisfying and most of all nourishing. One nice thing about canned fruit, is you can open it, put a tsp of whey in it and/or add a kefir culture, let it sit for a couple of days and you have fermented fruit, which is delicious and nutritious. 


    ~Drying greens and herbs for later use. For making nourishing herbal infusions as well as for adding to the soup pot. We will dry throughout the year the wild salad greens that we do not finish fresh. We dry them on a screen or flat basket and then store them in the pantry. We dry a vast array of greens in the salad, and we dry nettle, oats, rosehips, comfrey, linden and mullein for our daily infusions.


    ~Drying nuts and storing them for winter is another important staple in our pantry. We dry black walnuts, hazelnuts and hickory nuts. We have a friend who sends us pecans and we enjoy them as well. These are added to many of our meals and I make a snack of soaked and toasted nuts, tossed with seaweed.


    ~While I do not always collect my own seaweed, since I no longer live on the west coast, I do like to have large quantities on hand. Seaweed can be added to whatever else you are cooking ie egg dishes, roasted vegetables, soup, stews, oatmeal, wild rice etc. Really in small pieces it adds salt to your food and you don’t even know it is there….although the seaweed I like Nereocystis leutkeana is quite tasty and I have converted many a skeptical person into a seaweed enthusiast. If you would like to add seaweed to your stores you can order it from: http://www.ryandrum.com/IslandHerbsOrderForm2013.pdf


    ~Wild Rice, this is one of the biggest delights that has become a staple in my house since I moved to Wisconsin. Wild Rice is delicious nourishing and can be eaten for breakfast, lunch and dinner. It blends well with anything we eat and I like to have pounds of this on hand. This is true wild rice, not the patty grown wild rice, there is a big difference. If you would like to add wild rice to your stores you can find sources at this link: http://www.nativewildricecoalition.com/


    The Medicine Cabinet
    ~Herbs for topical application. Dry skin, sore muscles as well as strains and sprains are things I like to be prepared for for the winter months. Infused oils are an important component of my medicine chest and I like to have Calendula (Calendula officinalis), Chickweed (Stellaria media), St Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum) , Comfrey (Symphytum officinale), Yarrow (Achillea millefolium), Cottonwood (Poplar sp) and Lavender (Lavendula officinalis) on hand. These herbs will help me in responding to many concerns including dry skin, inflammation, cold sores, sprains and strains and sore muscles (after shoveling snow). 


    ~Herbs for internal applications. The medicine chest contains dry herbs for making infusions, which are in the pantry section, as we drink these daily. It also contains dry herbs that we many only enlist if we have symptoms ie fever, sore throat, cough etc. In addition, to dry herbs we like to have tinctures (alcohol extracts) on hand.  Many of the herbs we put up in oil form, we also store as a tincture ie St Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum)   , Yarrow (Achillea millefolium), Calendula (Calendula officinalis), Cottonwood  (Poplar sp) and Chickweed (Stellaria media). Tinctures are nice as they can be accessed quickly and applied right away. We also put up in tincture form herbs that have an affinity for the immune system: two of these are Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea) and Bee Propopolis. We make many tinctures for many purposes, but these are staples that we often use during the winter months. We also make cough syrups, the simplest of which are oxymels.


    ~Locenges or Pastilles. We make these in a very simple form by  using powdered herbs and our own honey. Slippery Elm (Ulmus rubra) and/or Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) Root Works well. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) , Rose Petals (Rose sp) and orange peel (Citrus × sinensis) are wonderful herbs to add as well.


    ~An oxymel is just a sweet and sour herbal syrup. It contains: vinegar, honey & herbs. They’re very beneficial for respiratory conditions, so the herbs contained therein will usually reflect that.

    How to make an oxymel

    ~Fill a jar about half to three-fourths full of herbs.
    ~Pour the jar 1/3 with honey. Ideally this would be raw local honey.
    ~Fill the jar 2/3 or the rest of the way with vinegar OR for a sweeter syrup, try 1/2 jar honey and 1/2 jar vinegar. (I am using raw apple cider vinegar).
    *the amounts that you use can be flexible. Both honey and vinegar act as preservatives, so you’re not going to ruin the mixture by altering the ratios.
    ~Stir it all together; it might not blend well at first, but it will settle and blend over time. Just stir and or shake until it is blended. Then strain the herbs out, bottle it up and store in a cool place or the refrigerator.

    Take oxymels by the spoonful for sore throats, thick congested coughs or as a general treatment to combat colds and flu.

    Some herbs recommended for use in oxymels

    *Elderberries (Sambucus sp):  relieves flu symptoms, alleviates allergies, and boosting to overall respiratory and immune health
    *Bee Balm (Monarda sp): eases a sore throat, antibacterial, relieves thick congested coughs as well as fever
    *Elder flowers (Sambucus sp): specific for sore throats, immune stimulating and antiviral
    *, Garlic & Onion: fights colds and flu, boosts immune health (it is suggested that these herbs are minced & that the mixture be refrigerated)
    *Horseradish: opens the respiratory system and fights off infection.
    *Mint, Ginger and/or fennel: stomach soothing, digestive aid
    *Oregano: antibacterial, antiviral, useful for upper respiratory infections
    *Rosemary: Useful for low energy and poor circulation, good for digestion and nerves.
    *Sage: antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral.
    *Thyme: for upper respiratory infections, coughs, bronchitis, antiviral and antibacterial. 
    *Lemon or orange peel can be added for their bioflavonoids, vitamin C and flavor



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Monday, December 24, 2018 7:08 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    No Spring without Winter!
    by Anne-Marie Fryer



    We just finished harvesting the fall vegetables from the garden beds. It is not long ago everything was growing vigorously. What has happened to the life of the garden? Where did all the life forces (or may I say fairies) go? The drawing in of life forces, begins in fall, continues through the beginning of winter and is completed as solstice approaches. These forces condense and stay active below the soil while on top of ground everything seems lifeless and asleep. In winter the sun is above the horizon for the shortest time, but the moon rises higher, staying in the night sky for many more hours than in the summer. In our garden seeds will soon cuddle cozily, under a blanket of snow, waiting for spring to arrive. We snuggle closer to the hearth as winter guides us into a quiet, inward mood of solitude and contemplation.

    Springtime is the season of new begins. As the sun climbs higher in the sky we sense the earth exhaling anew ascending currents of life forces. We experience deeply the outward upward growth and opening feeling of renewal as a contrast to the withdrawing of life forces in winter. Through the interplay of the sun and the earth, nature’s power of growth intensifies and millions of tons of leaves and grasses are brought forth within weeks. The new life and vitality of spring fill us with jubilation and hope.

    In summer the earth is breathing out its life forces completely. The sun is at its highest, bathing our world in warmth and light. The air feels full and expanded. The growth processes, begun in the spring, are now at their peak, ripening and maturing. The gardens and fields yield a cornucopia of fresh fruits and vegetables. This magical moods of summer penetrate us with enthusiasm and warmth while we dream the ‘Midsummer’s Dreams.’

    With autumn approaching the days mellow. We experience the sun’s weakening influence on earth and the softening of the light. As the sun withdraws from the hemisphere the earth mother inhales with certainty the life forces back into her womb. Temperatures fall and growth processes slow down. Leaves fall from their branches and seeds drop to the ground. We bring the harvest to the root cellar and put the garden to rest. As winter draws nearer our thinking crystallizes, courage builds up and our sense of inner light strengthens.

    During these coming winter month try to express the moods of each season through writing, drawing, painting, music, sculpturing or poetry. These delicious baked cinnamon apples will surely set the mood for the winter mood.

    Baked Cinnamon Apples

    Cinnamon and apples go well together in this warming and relaxing dessert, suited for fall. Use a variety of apples and discover how they differ in sweetness and crunch.

    3 tablespoons walnuts
    4 apples
    1 tablespoon light miso
    2 tablespoons freshly ground peanut butter (optional)
    2 tablespoons water
    1 tablespoon cinnamon

    Soak the walnuts in lightly salted water 4-6 hours. Drain and chop them fine.

    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

    Core the apples with an apple corer or spoon. Make sure not to cut all the way through the apple.

    In a small bowl mix the miso and peanut butter. Add water, cinnamon and chopped walnuts.

    Spoon 1 tablespoon of the filling into each apple.

    Place the apples in a baking dish. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until soft.



    Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt is a Waldorf class and kindergarten teacher, biodynamic farmer, author and nutritional counselor. She has taught nutritional cooking and counseled for 25 years in her homeland Denmark, Europe and the United States.

    She trained as a macrobiotic cooking teacher and counselor and studied the principles of oriental medicine and the research of Dr. Weston A. Price before embracing the anthroposophical approach to nutrition, food and cooking.





    This Four week course will explore some of the many benefits of fermented and cultured foods, and why it is important to include them regularly with every meal. You will be guided through the steps of making sauerkraut, kimchi, pickled vegetables, kefir, soft cheese, and yogurt, as well as get a chance to discover new fermented drinks such as kvass, wines, and beers. I will aim at answering personal questions around your culturing and fermenting experiences.


    Intuitively we know that cultured and fermented foods are real health foods. Naturally fermented and cultured foods are an exceptional way to prepare different ingredients and some of the most important side dishes and condiments in our diet. They are often overlooked or not mentioned when we describe what we had for dinner, and yet they are pivotal in creating a well-balanced, nutritious meal.

    They add a bounty of nourishing, life-promoting substances and life forces, almost miraculous curative properties, and a wealth of colors, flavors, and shapes. They increase the appetite, stimulate the digestion, and make any simple meal festive and satisfying. The course will be highly practical with many hands-on activities.


     

    In this Four week course you will learn about the nutritional needs of your growing child and receive delicious, seasonal, wholesome nutritious menus and recipes on affordable budget so as to encourage children to eat and live healthy.

    During this course we will explore the nutritious needs for your growing child.

    We will discover how rhythm, simplicity and nourishing activities support a healthy child development. You will find new ways to encourage your child to develop a taste for natural, wholesome foods as well as receive and create delicious, seasonal nutritious menus and recipes that stay within the limits of your budget.





    Cooking for the Love of the World:
    Awakening our Spirituality through Cooking

    by Anne-Marie Fryer Wiboltt



    A heart-centered, warmth-filled guide to the nurturing art of cooking. 200 pages, softbound


     
  • Thursday, December 20, 2018 1:40 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

     

     

    I like to call our Urban Permaculture Farm, the Herbal Homestead. I call it this, because for me it all started with herbs. My first herb teachers were wise woman herbalists. They encouraged me to focus on the herbs growing right outside of my doorstep and this has remained as a pivotal place for me to return over and over again.

    A lot happens at our homestead. We grow food and medicine, we wild forage from green spaces in our community as well as neighbors yards. We tend the critters in our space, we feed ourselves, as well as our family and friends. We strive to expand our understanding of life and to weave ourselves into our surroundings.

    This column will highlight some of the things that happen here at The Herbal Homestead. It is an invitation to spend time with me through stories of daily life. 



    Winter Nourishment: Soup Stocks and Broths

    This morning I awoke and it was cold. We heat our home with a wood furnace, so sleeping 8 hours means that you wake up to a chilly house. My wool comforter made by the local woolen mill, keeps me very warm at night, yet when I emerge from under the covers I have two goals.

    1. To reignite the wood stove

         2. To make something warm to drink.


    I often make a cup of tea, but some mornings only a cup of broth will do.  I was inspired a couple of years ago when I attended a Weston A. Price Foundation Conference to begin incorporating broth into my breakfast routine. At the conference they served broth for breakfast. It was winter and I will never forget how satisfying that morning cup of broth was. I realized that by stereotyping broth as an afternoon or evening food, I was missing out on a very special morning opportunity. Of course I still incorporate broth into my winter stews and soups, but I now have expanded my horizons and added it to our homestead breakfast list!


    Below are a few of my favorite recipes for broth. Broth can be made and frozen for future use.

     

    How to Make Soup Stock: 3 Easy Broth Recipes

    Soup stocks are incredibly healthy, nutrient dense and serve as a quintessential comfort food on a cold day. Soup stock has a long history as a nourishing and healing food. While the village herbalist has always known the healing power of soup stock and chicken soup in particular, it took until the year 2000 for CNN headlines to read, “Chicken soup is medicine, U.S. scientists confirm.” Glad they caught up.


    There is no doubt that homemade soup and soup stock is healthy, tastes good and is easy to make.  The following are recipes that serve as guidelines. I say guidelines, as I am a scratch cook, which means that I add what I have. I love to add new herbs, spices, vegetables and animals parts. A couple of years ago I began adding egg shells. It means the stock that I make is always new and interesting. I often add herbs and spices not only for flavor, but to increase the nutrient density of the stock.

     

    Vegetable Stock


    Place the chopped vegetables, herbs, and spices into a crock pot or stockpot. I like a crockpot, as it can be left unattended for long periods of time. Add enough cold water to cover the vegetables. Simmer for approximately 24 hours. Many people make vegetable stock from scraps such as peels and stems. If you use vegetable scraps to make your stock, you will need to strain them from the stock and discard them when finished. And to note, when you boil vegetables for a meal, a lot of their flavor and nutrients leach out into the water.


    The next time you boil vegetables, save the water and add it to your vegetable stock or next batch of soup. Of course being the seaweed lover that I am, I sometimes thicken and enhance the consistency of a vegetable broth by adding a red seaweed ie dulse, turkish towel and/or irish moss. Red seaweed contains carrageenan, which adds viscosity or thickness to the broth and is nutritious. Carrageenan is particularly supportive to the digestive system.    

     

    Chicken or Turkey Stock

    Place chicken or turkey bones, spare meat, vegetable scraps, herbs and spices into a stockpot or slow cooker. If you have access to the feet of the animal you will want to add them, as this will add gelatin to the broth for a thick, rich, highly nutritious broth. Add enough cold water to cover the vegetables and bones. Simmer for 24 hours. Foam will form on the surface of the stock as it simmers. Use a spoon, or ladle, to skim it off. Strain the bones and vegetable scraps from the stock and discard them.

     

    Beef Stock


    Begin by baking the beef soup bones in the oven at 450 degrees for half an hour. If you have access to oxtail bones you will want to add them, as this will add gelatin. As with chicken or turkey broth, the gelatin will create a thick nutritious broth.  Put the beef bones, spare meat, vegetable scraps, herbs and spices into a stockpot. Add enough cold water to cover the vegetables and bones. Simmer for approximately 24 hours. Foam will form on the surface of the beef stock as it simmers. Use a spoon, or ladle, to skim it off. Strain the bones and vegetable scraps from the stock and discard them.

     

    *For bone broths you will want to place your stock in the refrigerator for 8 hours in order to separate the fat and for the broth to gel. The best broth will be quite gelatinous.


    *Adding herbs to any of these broths will also increase their nutrient density. I often add seaweed, burdock, astragalus, mushrooms, lovage, alfalfa, nettle and whatever else happens to be near by. There is no limit to what you can add to your stocks! Have fun! Seaweed added to stock contributes much needed trace minerals.


    Gelatin extracted from bones is a nutritious source of protein as well as collagen, calcium, minerals and the amino acids proline and glycine.


    Stock made from poultry or other bones increases endurance and strengthens the immune system and veins, arteries, muscles, tendons, skin and bones. It also soothes and heals the gastro-intestinal tract and is thus a potent medicine for people suffering from food sensitivities and digestive or bowel problems. All stock provides an easily assimilable form of vitamins and minerals.

     

    Using Your Stock


    You can use the stock immediately as a base for soup, or you can freeze it and begin making your soup on another day. If you freeze the soup stock, leave a bit of space in the top of the container for expansion. It is a good idea to freeze the stock into the portion size that works best for you. A single cup of stock can be warmed on a cold day for an instant meal for breakfast, lunch or dinner.


    Tossing in leftover meat and vegetables from the refrigerator creates a wonderful meal. Adding cream, pureed vegetables, starch, or flour can thicken soup stock. I also cook rice and other grains in soup stock for added nutrition and flavor. This is a very creative process and a great way to enjoy leftovers in a new and refreshing form.


    May the stock be with you during these cold winter days.



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.
  • Wednesday, December 12, 2018 9:33 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Move with Ganesha Elephant
    Sheryl Wolover


    Learn the playful moves of an Elephant's trunk in your Yoga practice. This practice opens the shoulder, wrist and forearms.The powerful Ganesha Mudra helps us in are most challenging situations. Be sure to watch the video all the way to the end and see a surprise :) This video is about Move with Ganesha Elephant




    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl ~ yogalegends.com

  • Thursday, December 06, 2018 11:45 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    New Moon in Sagittarius: Full Steam Ahead

    by Kathy Crabbe



    Bear Power by Kathy Crabbe from the Elfin Ally Oracle Deck

    Mama Moon enters the fiery, freedom loving sign of the traveler on Dec. 5 at 6:49 am until Dec. 8 becoming a NEW MOON on Dec. 6 at 11:20 pm pst.

    This Moon-Time adds some pep to your step and a cheery ego boost which can be put to positive use if you’re fighting for a good cause. BUT, don’t over-react because it may be too easy to do just that right now. Take the higher, deeper road instead. With planet Mercury going Direct on the day of the New Moon you’re gonna get some much needed help to finally move forward.

    On a spiritual note, gather up all the bits of wisdom you’ve accumulated so far and write down ONE lesson you feel you’ve truly learned because this may be the reason you’re here.

    Sagittarius New Moon Elfin Ally: White Bear*
    Oracle Card Meaning: Your family or tribe takes precedence right now.
    Reversed: You may be feeling left out in the cold, longing for warmth.

    *Excerpted from the Elfin Ally Oracle Deck.


    Sagittarius New Moon Lefty Oracle: The comet has landed and her name is Genevieve*

    Mantra: I have a breakthrough.
    Affirmation: I am guided, clear and connected to Source.
    Element: Fire

    If this card appears in a reading it’s time to acknowledge your gifts and talents. You have been given an opportunity to shine, so take it even if it’s only a very small opportunity. Little things are JUST as important as big things because they often lead the way to bigger breakthroughs. But you do need to take that first step and acknowledge yourself first. Don’t expect someone else to do that for you. You need to take responsibility for you.

    In my own life I am sometimes ask how I maintain my passion for creating, writing, spiritual guidance etc. For me, it’s a slow, steady and daily practice that comes in waves. Sometimes my art is in the forefront, sometimes my soul readings, but my writing and journaling are a daily practice. I ride the waves knowing that my passions ebb and flow. Along the way opportunities pop up and I am ready for them because I do the work.

    *Excerpted from the Lefty Oracle Deck.


    Kathy Crabbe has been an artist forever and a soul reader since awakening her intuitive gifts at age forty after five years painting with her non dominant left hand. This awoke her intuition in a big way. In 2008 she created a Lefty Oracle deck and started giving intuitive soul readings that have touched many lives in profound and playful ways. Kathy lives in sunny Southern California with her pet muses and architect husband in an adobe home they built themselves.

    Kathy’s art and writing has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazines and books including the San Diego Women’s History Museum, We’Moon Datebook, and Sawdust Art Festival in Laguna Beach to name a few. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and ecourses and maintains a regularly updated blog, etsy store and portfolio site. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992. Kathy has been an educator and mentor at Laguna Outreach Community Artists, Mt. San Jacinto College, Wise Woman University, Inspire San Diego Studio, HGTV, Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show as well as teaching her own classes: “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul”, and New Moon Circles. She is a founding member of the Temecula Artist’s Circle, the Temecula Writer’s Café and the Riverside Art Museum’s Printmaker’s Network. Metaphysically speaking, Kathy has studied with Francesca De Grandis (Third Road Celtic Faerie Shamanism), Adam Higgs (psychic mediumship), Om, devotee of Sri Chinmoy (meditation), Atma Khalsa (yoga), Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive), Joyce Fournier, RN (Therapeutic Touch), Steven Forrest & Jeffrey Wolf Green (astrology) and she received certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy.
    Learn more here.


    Kathy’s 4 week eClass “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul” is once again being offered at Wise Woman University so get ready to Moon Collage your heart out starting one week prior to the New Moon each month…more details here: eClass.
  • Tuesday, December 04, 2018 5:09 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Moon Stew
    by Avia Kelly

    • 1 medium onion, peeled and chopped
    • 4 cloves garlic, minced
    • 3 Tablespoons butter
    • 4-6 cups veggie or meat stock
    • 1/2 cup dry lentils, sorted and rinsed
    • 1 large fresh burdock root, sliced
    • 1/4 cup molasses
    • 1/2 teaspoon fresh ginger root, peeled and grated
    • 1 small can crushed tomatoes
    • 1 rib celery, chopped
    • 1 sweet potato, peeled and cubed
    • 1 large carrot, chopped
    • a bunch beet greens, chopped
    • splash of honey
    • splash of apple cider vinegar
    • salt or tamari to taste


    In a soup pot, saute garlic and onion in butter until brown.
    Add remaining ingredients and bring to a boil.
    Lower heat to a simmer and cook for 1-2 hrs or until the lentils are soft.
    Add more stock or spring water if the stew gets too thick.
    Share and enjoy!

  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018 7:17 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Winter Herbal Adventure - part 2
    by Jane Foxglove





    I am sure by now that our Parrot and Puppy wonder where we are and that my Mom and Dad are worried that we are late getting back. I hope they notify someone that we have not reached the airport in New Jersey.

    Doc had wondered what types of plants and herbs and trees grow here in the wilds of the northeast. This is NOT the way I had planned to show him!

    I was anxious to explore around our campsite.  Charlie stayed with Lynn to keep the signal fire burning. Both parties had a whistle to signal for help in case of bear sightings or danger.  Doc was sore and stiff but with a walking stick he adventured into the woods with me. Eagerly I wandered, but never far from his watchful eye. He had the presence of mind to mark our trail and turns with small piles of rocks and twigs so we could find our way back.
              
    I recognized a Black Birch tree with the smooth bark and horizontal cracks.  Not many leaves were left on the tree.  We collected small branches and twigs. When we did the scratch and sniff test on the tender bark we could smell the wintergreen oil scent. This could later be made into a tea. A cup full would be equal to one fourth or one half an Aspirin as an anti inflammatory.
               
    Nearby was a Sassafras tree. I recognized the mitten shaped leaf, some were oval and others had three lobes. The root bark has a root beer taste.  We collected some to mask the taste of the water purification tablets and make a healing tea for rheumatic pain and a compress for swellings and bruises.
                
    Mullein Flower spikes stood tall along the rocky rough ground. I collected the leaves to use as a cough remedy for Lynn, the hairy leaf tea would need to be strained thru a bandanna to remove the fuzz that could irritate her throat. Burning some of these leaves could create a healing smoke during an asthma attack. I saved some of the tall flower spikes to burn as taper candles.

    Queen Anne’s Lace or Wild Carrot grew nearby.  Doc noted that the fuzzy stalks visually gave us a clue that this was not the smooth stalked Poison Hemlock. I thanked the plant for giving us the healing carrot-like root for our soup. The richness of Vitamin C and carotene would be mildly diuretic and lower blood pressure.          

    Doc and I laughed and said we could create the tastiest Stone Soup to keep us alive on this mountain.  Burdock grew near the field with its huge hairy elephant ear leaves. The burrs that carry the seeds of the plant on the fur of deer and forest animals stuck like barbs in the wool of my capote sleeve. The beige taproot could be thinly sliced into our soup; the inulin and protein would be good for Doc and Charlie's diabetic sugar levels. Doc told me how he had bruised and shredded the leaf and mixed it with egg whites to poultice a burn victim at a retreat. The leaves used internally and externally could treat hair loss, ringworm, eczema and skin eruptions.
     
    Pear shaped Puff Ball Mushrooms grew on an old log. To me it looked like a dirty Styrofoam golf ball. It had no stem or gills like an Amantra mushroom. Doc cut one open to be sure it did not have black/purple spores inside like a Poison Pig Skin puffball. We decided this would be a safe addition to our soup.
                
    Red Reishi mushrooms hung like little shelves on an old dying Maple tree, the dark red color reminded me it would be a nourishing blood purifier, We carefully wrapped the mushrooms in paper to catch all the spoor dust.  Sliced into our soup, it would give the brew a meaty texture.

    Herbalists have used the Reishi for healing cancer and during Chemo/Radiation therapy to enhance immunity, lower blood pressure, sooth sore joints, tendons and bones.

    Dandelion greens were easy to spot in the melting snow.  Fortunately the ground was not yet frozen and we could easily pull out the taproot and leaves. The natural inulin sugar would help both Doc and Charlie's diabetes. The nourishing vitamins and minerals were a healthy addition to our soup. One leaf was worth 500iu Vitamin C.

    Garlic Mustard's heart shaped scalloped leaves had a pungent garlic bitter flavor; the white fleshy roots would add more flavor to our soup. We remembered Steve Brill’s lecture on how this leaf is a natural antifreeze-- it lowers the freezing temperature of water! We both decided to chew a few leaves just in case we got any colder.  What a shame it would not work in the plane.

    Plantain stalks poked up nearby. The seeds were easy to tap out of the stalk to save as a soup thickener. The leaves would be good for burns and bruise poultices.
     
    As we circled the field, I saw a beautiful sight, a gnarled tree with dark colored bark that had a rectangle mosaic pattern. Birds were happily feeding on some shiny dark copper fruits. Persimmons! The sweet fruits were bruised from the frost and snow.  The scent of the mushy nectar had also attracted some drowsy bees who should have already been hibernating for the winter. The sticky juice helped sweeten the garlicky after-taste in our mouths from the mustard greens. We harvested more fruits to take back to camp.
     
    Nearby a Stinging Nettle bush with its wealth of vitamins and minerals in the leaf could be added to our soup. The stingers would soften in our cooking pot and become a tonic for lungs, asthma and a kidney flush to reduce diabetic sugar levels and diarrhea, worms, hemorrhoids and colon disorders. My leather gloves protected me from the stingers as I harvested the leaves.

    Comfrey, my personal totem plant, is also called "Knit-bone" with its long full and fuzzy green leaves. In the fall the flowers had faded but the leaves were easy to gather. We would be able to soften the leaf hairs with a little hot water to make a poultice wrap for Lynn's ribs and Charlie's knee. I pulled up some of the root for our soup.  The calcium boost would treat arthritis, rheumatic joints, burns, cuts and bruises. The remaining root left in the ground will re-grow a fresh plant in the spring.   

    Slippery Elm tree with its sticky inner bark could be chewed or brewed for internal inflammations and external poultice. Powdered, the bark would thicken our soup.        

    Witch Hazel blossoms late in the year after the leaves have fallen, and it grows well under the tree canopy. A tea of its inner bark is quite calming and nourishing for internal bleeding and intestinal, uterine and hemorrhoid problems. This is a wonderful menopausal remedy.

    Red Oaks grow in our woods. Their small bitter acorns were pretty well picked over by the local squirrels. An oak gall or pollen ball was easy to pluck from a low branch.  The potent tannic acid would act as a styptic to stop bleeding or to bathe wounds. The tightening astringent of the leaves and twigs could be chewed or brewed as a tea. A little bit goes a long way.

    Small Partridge berries or Squaw Vine grew low to the ground like a carpet. The red oval berries grew in pairs and looked fused together. I remembered this could be tinctured as a Mother’s Cordial for fertility and a uterine tonic for cramps.
               
    Wintergreen's shiny leaves lead me to the sweet reddened berry. The methylsalicylate in the leaf is related to Aspirin and has pain killing anti inflammatory use for muscle aches.

    As I reached for another vine with a white berry climbing a tree Doc yelled, “Don't touch that!”  I had not recognized the poison ivy hairy vine because the leaves had started to turn a reddish bronze from the cold.  In my backyard the shiny green "leaves of three-stay away from me" are usually in one area. Doc said ‘hairy rope don't be a dope" with a smile.

    By now we were hungry and tired and had circled around back to our camp to start a nourishing pot of soup and attend our injured loved ones. Doc was able to make a poultice with the plantain, mullein and comfrey leaves and bind it to Lynn's ribs and Charlie's knee.
     
    As the soup simmered, we snacked on cheese and a few pine nuts Charlie and Lynn discovered near our tipi. The heat from our camp fire may have released the pine nuts from the hanging cones. Within an hour we decided to give the soup a try.  Hungry people will eat darn near anything!

    A young male bear smelled our cooking pot and wandered close to our camp. Lynn handed Charlie the gun Doc had kept in the tent. He fired two shots and scared it away.

    After all the excitement our soup had cooled off a little bit and we added crumbled cheese to our mugs of soup making it creamier and tastier. Oh the power of cheese!

    In the distance we heard a helicopter coming around the mountain! Our smoke signal had been spotted! Rescue was on its way. Within the hour we were air lifted to the hospital. X-rays showed that Lynn's cracked ribs had already started healing, and Charlie's knee was still sore but not broken. Doc was relieved that everyone was going to be OK. Getting the plane off the mountain would be another problem.  Maybe it was still under warranty!      

  • Friday, November 23, 2018 11:12 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Gemini Full Moon Vibes: Mindful Breathing Will Help
    by Kathy Crabbe



    Gemini Full Moon Elfin Ally: Blue Butterfly*

    Mama  Moon enters the sign of Gemini at 8:10 pm pst on Nov. 22 becoming Full at 9:39 pm and leaves Gemini on Nov. 24 at 10:37 pm.

    This particular Moon may test our boundaries in regards to family so it’s NOT a good time to get into an argument, especially over the finer details of a problem.

    Tip: To let off steam take a bathroom break and meditate or practice mindful breathing. On a more positive note you’ll be assisted by Neptune which means it’s an ideal time to daydream, relax and enjoy that vibe while you can.

    On a spiritual note try and take a moment with your tribe and your teachers to remember old times and have a good chuckle about all that you’ve been through together because there is healing in this right now.

    Blue Butterfly Medicine: Your tiny but oh, so powerful magic reminds us who we are and where we come from on a personal and cosmic level.
    Oracle Card Meaning: Pay attention to the details.
    Reversed: You are easily overwhelmed.

    *Excerpted from the Elfin Ally Oracle Deck.


    Gemini Full Moon Lefty Oracle: Behold*

    Mantra: I delight.
    Affirmation: Dare I eat the fruit of my delight?
    Element: Spirit

    If this card appears in a reading it’s time to plunge into the dark and pull out hope. Whatever stressful conundrum you’re currently in, know that you HAVE the resources and inner strength and power to find a solution and gain clarity. You CAN pull it off. It may require some dirty work, so buckle down and get your hands dirty. There is a decent prize at the end of it all and it’s definitely worth fighting for. If you’re hesitant or un-sure of what to do next then think like a cat, independently. Think for yourself; trust yourself. Call upon your intuition and the Divine or your higher power. You CAN do this; it’s just a matter of time before all will be sorted out and you can once again move forward.

    In my own life I sometimes need to get my ‘monkey-mind’ (when my mind is all over the place) out of the mix and be more fully in the moment, trusting that I am being guided and that I can indeed hear and trust my intuition. Like a muscle, the more I work it, the stronger it becomes.

    *Excerpted from the Lefty Oracle Deck




    Kathy Crabbe has been an artist forever and a soul reader since awakening her intuitive gifts at age forty after five years painting with her non dominant left hand. This awoke her intuition in a big way. In 2008 she created a Lefty Oracle deck and started giving intuitive soul readings that have touched many lives in profound and playful ways. Kathy lives in sunny Southern California with her pet muses and architect husband in an adobe home they built themselves.

    Kathy’s art and writing has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazines and books including the San Diego Women’s History Museum, We’Moon Datebook, and Sawdust Art Festival in Laguna Beach to name a few. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and ecourses and maintains a regularly updated blog, etsy store and portfolio site. Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen’s University and a Graphic Design Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992. Kathy has been an educator and mentor at Laguna Outreach Community Artists, Mt. San Jacinto College, Wise Woman University, Inspire San Diego Studio, HGTV, Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show as well as teaching her own classes: “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul”, and New Moon Circles. She is a founding member of the Temecula Artist’s Circle, the Temecula Writer’s Café and the Riverside Art Museum’s Printmaker’s Network. Metaphysically speaking, Kathy has studied with Francesca De Grandis (Third Road Celtic Faerie Shamanism), Adam Higgs (psychic mediumship), Om, devotee of Sri Chinmoy (meditation), Atma Khalsa (yoga), Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive), Joyce Fournier, RN (Therapeutic Touch), Steven Forrest & Jeffrey Wolf Green (astrology) and she received certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell’s Crystal Academy.
    Learn more here.


    Kathy’s 4 week eClass “Awaken Your Divine Feminine Soul” is once again being offered at Wise Woman University so get ready to Moon Collage your heart out starting one week prior to the New Moon each month…more details here: eClass.
  • Tuesday, November 20, 2018 10:41 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Underwater Sama Vritti Pranayama Practice

    Sheryl Wolover



    A new thought on how to practice Sama Vritti (equal inhale & exhale) Image yourself breathing underwater....with scuba equipment of course :)





    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl
    http://www.pacific-elements.com/
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