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  • Thursday, November 06, 2014 6:09 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Blessed Mama Earth Balls
    Happy Full Moon in Taurus

    by Kathy Crabbe


    Dear Creative Soul,

    It’s the Full Moon in Taurus; an earthy, lusty, fixed sign that just loves life’s luxuries.  This Full Moon I am feeling guided to share something personal since Taurus does so love to get down and dirty; hands in the muck so to speak, and I do hope you join me!

    To start things off I pull a card from my Creative Soul Deck (aka my ‘lefty’ deck) for guidance.

    Ali by Kathy Crabbe (Creative Soul Card)Creative Soul Guidance: Ali


    Affirmation: I believe in me

    Ali, with the world on her head is a seeker and a finder of ways to help and serve human-kind; a heavy weight indeed, but loaded with joy and blessings as well.

    Where are you guided to serve? And do you serve already, or if not do you have any wishes and dreams for serving/helping others?

    As for me I’ve been a spiritual and intuitive artist for many years and I just love to share that with others through my writing, my art, my blog, my creative soul readings, my classes etc.


    Creative Soul Challenge

    In what ways could you better serve others and yourself in the process?

    How will you begin to serve or continue with what you’re already doing?

    I do pretty well in this regard, but I am also interested in public art projects which beautify sad and neglected places and help heal broken hearts and souls in the process. I am looking into a public art commission in Riverside County as well as reading an inspirational book by Lily Yeh called “Awakening Creativity: Dandelion School Blossoms”.

    emeraldEmerald’s Healing Song

    O Brave Soul
    you have traveled far
    to the Moon, to La Lune, to the Moon
    Oh Brave Soul
    who has known pain
    sadness and gloom
    Lift up your arms
    and shout, “I am here
    and I rise and I fall with Your tides
    and I
    am
    beautiful
    as are You.”
    Blessed be.

    Taurus Full Moon Circle Suggestions from my Goddess Zodiac Playbook

    • Gemstones: emerald, chrysocolla, moss agate
    • Plant/Tree: apple, daisy, poppy, rose
    • Herb/Spice: clove, sage, spearmint
    • Food: apple, bean, cereal, pear
    • Animal Spirit: beaver, cattle
    • Tarot Card: hierophant
    • Goddess: Demeter, Flora, Gaia, Hathor, Hera, Nokomis, Olwen, Rhea






    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, author and educator who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, creative soul classes, intuitive readings and online resources infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy's work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, art fairs, magazine and books
    including the San Diego Women’s History Museum and the We’Moon Datebook. She has self-published several books, zines, oracle decks and e-courses and maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and etsy shop.
     
    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen's University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada. She has been working as a professional artist since 1992.
     
    Kathy has been an educator and mentor for Laguna Outreach Community Artists, the Sawdust Art Festival, HGTV, Wise Woman University, and Michelle Shocked’s International Women’s Day Show. Currently she is teaching her Creative Soul Class at Yoga for Life Temecula, Inspire San Diego and Mt. San Jacinto College.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.


    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell's Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Currently Kathy is studying Celtic Faerie Shamanism with Francesca De Grandis, author of
    Be A Goddess. Learn more here.

  • Monday, November 03, 2014 9:32 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Kiva’s Herbal Obsessions
    by Kiva Rose

    A personal welcome to the first in what will be a series of articles for this Ezine, including excerpts from the several books I recently wrote with my partner Wolf.  I’ll try to cover a little bit of everything herbal, from plant profiles to bioregional herbalism, always from my own perspective and experience.  I write not as an expert authority, but as an herb-obsessed misfit, a onetime street kid, and now a village WeedWife and committed wilderness dweller.

    Those of you who are familiar with me and Plant Healer Magazine know that my emphasis is on a community based herbalism that empowers the practitioner, on the inspiring stories and folklore of medicines, on the plants themselves and on what they can teach us about the needed healing of our culture and planet.  Part of our mission is to help seed the community of folks who feel like solitaries and outliers, rebels or visionaries, and those isolated root doctors and kitchen witches who don’t want to be measured by the letters after their names... not just practitioners in the clinical sense, looking for info and skills, but also impassioned plant lovers, urban foragers, wildcrafters, back-to-the-landers, tribalists, punk anarchists, tribal rockers, artists, and eco-activists.

    Thank to Justine and Susun for encouraging me to post here.  I’ll be gratified if anything I contribute in the coming months proves useful to you, or inspires you on your individual healing path.
    –Much love, Kiva


    Part I: Where My Skin Ends & Flowers Begin


    (from the book The Enchanted Healer)

    “Never in my life
    had I felt myself so near
    that porous line
    where my own body was done with
    and the roots and the stems and the flowers
    began.”

    -Mary Oliver

    At the periphery of all my thoughts are leaves and twigs, tangled together and growing along the boundaries of my imagination and ideas. The twining roots of Alder trees knot themselves into the bower between my waking and sleeping worlds, holding me always here – in the mountain forests and river canyons where the plants thrive and multiply, carpeting my world in a verdant profusion of color and scent.



    I am infatuated with all things wild, from a single red-pawed fox drinking from the river, to great dark clouds of migrating birds or small groups of human children laughing as they gather golden-brown nuts from underneath towering Oak trees. The diversity of the expressions of life on this planet never fail to intrigue and amaze me but it is the leafed and rooted things that most call to me. The trumpet-shaped blossoms of Datura and the creeping red and green glimmer of Purslane serve as a beacon for my eyes and I often find myself on hands and knees to see them more closely before I’m even aware that I’m moving.

    My first memories as a toddler are of plants, of Yarrow and Peppergrass thriving in my front yard. My nomadic history is marked from childhood on by the flowers and trees that grew wherever I settled for a while, by Honeysuckle vines clambering up island fences, by Pokeweed’s red stems shooting up next to our Midwestern barn door and by the Lavender fields of the Pacific Northwest. Anywhere I’ve ever even briefly passed through, the plants in all their myriad colors and shapes have been companions and markers along my winding path.

    I recently heard Matthew Wood say something like “I’m in this for the plants first” meaning that it was his deep love of interacting with the plants themselves that brought him to herbalism originally more than a desire to practice medicine. I smiled when I heard Matt say that because it’s a sentiment I’ve frequently expressed myself. Facilitating health and well-being in people is incredibly fulfilling for me. I experience a distinct and overwhelming feeling of satisfaction when I’m able to help someone feel better through my recommendations or assistance. But I won’t lie, if herbs weren’t available and the only avenue of medicine was chemical powders and patented pharmaceutical products, then I’d have to find a different way of helping people. It’s imperative to my own happiness and effectiveness that my work as a healthcare practitioner also provide a direct connection back to the natural world for myself.

    The herbs themselves are a primary part of what draws me to botanical medicine, and what compels me to find ways of matching plant to person in this complex and ancient dance we call herbalism. Plants are what initially attracted me to this field and they are the nourishment and inspiration that keep me excited and involved in it. Whether intently keying out some new species of wildflower, digging wild roots, formulating medicines for clients or lying flat on my back in an especially sweet patch of Melilotus, I am always searching out direct engagement with the green world that provides me with so much sustenance and solace.

    A portion of what I attempt to impart to clients and students is a deepened awareness of the natural world, and especially of the ways in which working with the plants can grant us a sense of at-homeness and belonging. In a culture where so many of us feel displaced this reconnection to food, medicine, self and community through place is of primary importance. We are made more fully ourselves by our relationship to the natural world, including the other animals, bacteria and plants we share our bioregions with. So much of healing is entirely about relationship. Relationship between a person and their body, between person and place, between person and plant.

    I am endlessly fascinated by all the ways in which humans and plants interact, both historically and in the present moment, across all cultures and geographies. We humans have evolved in every way to live with and be dependent on the plants. The kingdom of Plantae flourished long before our genesis as a species and will likely continue after we recede from the landscapes of this planet. Which only serves to make me that much more grateful for the beauty and breath they bring to our every moment. Each time I touch the soft weave of a cotton dress, hear the wind roar around the walls of our cozy wooden cabin or take a sip of the tea blended from wild herbs near my home I am reminded in a visceral, immediate way of how intertwined my life is with these green, sun-eating creatures I so adore.

    My obsession with all things plant-related extends beyond herbalism into botany, ecology, naturalism, wildcrafting, gardening and just about anything else that brings me closer to the plants, especially living plants in their chosen habitat. Nothing is so likely to fascinate and fully envelop me as crawling through the forest understory, breathing in the scent of life turning to death, turning to life in the shape of leaves falling, rotting only to unfurl from warm soil yet again. Down in the dirt, I look for every tiny flower, for each previously unnoticed tendril or bud. I want to know the texture of every sepal, the scent of flowers through their stages of blooming, the names of not only each plant but every plant part. The need to experience, witness and understand plant life is a driving force in nearly all that I do.

    Even at night the plants dominate my thoughts as I dream of vines that wind toward far away stars and luminescent flowers whose form I’ve never found in any of my many books on botany. I lay my head against the ground and listen to the pulse and mutter of roots all through my long hours of sleep. In the worlds of both slumber and waking, the plants are singing to me. Not so much in words or audible melodies, but in the rhythm of my own blood where it surges toward the surface of my skin when I reach for an unfamiliar spray of leaves, when I breathe in the sun-warmed scent of crushed Juniper berries. Where my skin ends and flowers begin.


    ********************************


    Kiva Rose Hardin is the co-founder and co-editor of the acclaimed Plant Healer Magazine, hosting a quarterly column by Susun and hundreds of pages of herbal art and articles.  She co-produces the unique Traditions in Western Herbalism Conference, offers her limited edition perfumes and elixirs at BrambleAndTheRose.com, and is the coauthor of several books including the trilogy The Plant Healer’s Path, The Enchanted Healer, and The Healing Terrain.  You can find more of her writings on her blog, and in the free Herbaria Newsletter available along with her books on her site: www.PlantHealer.org.






  • Tuesday, October 28, 2014 10:42 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Earth Friendly Organic Halloween Makeup, Celebrate the Pagan Holiday with Plant Essence Chemical-Free Makeup

    by Dayna Colvin



    Next to Christmas and Thanksgiving, Halloween is one of the most celebrated honored holidays of the year. It never ceases to amaze me how many people get into the spirit of the holiday and enjoy the festivities. 2,000 years ago, Halloween was a very sacred holiday celebrated by the Celtic people in the ancient British Isles. It was a holiday celebrated by Druids, Witches and Wiccan Covens, Fairies, Elves, and various other Celtic Tribes. On All Hallows' Eve, as it was called back then, the Druids would go from door to door holding an empty basket asking for fruit and whatever treats the residents would give them. Later in the evening, everyone would gather together in a festival, dancing, singing, playing, and enjoying the foods they were given.

    Many centuries later, Halloween is still a celebrated holiday, but today things have drastically changed. People still enjoy wearing costumes, pretending to be their alter ego. They also enjoy going door to door saying, "trick or treat" and asking for sweet treats, but the tradition has vastly changed. Halloween is probably one of the most expensive holidays. As soon as the summer begins to fade, stores begin stocking up for Halloween and the Christmas Holiday Season. Throughout the store, you’ll see the regular merchandise combined with racks upon racks of new Halloween paraphernalia.

    One of the biggest traditions of Halloween is the wild and elaborate costumes people design. Many people go with the traditional Angels, Ghosts, Devils, and Superheroes, while others opt for outlandish costumes, portraying celebrities in Hollywood. The costumes are usually cute, colorful, and beautiful and the makeup is a process all to its own. Dressing up and playing make believe, pretending to be someone or something else for a day is fun and exciting. It is a beautiful way to express the inner child. The problem is that the makeup and hair goo that is used to complement the costumes is usually toxic, smelly, and very harmful to the health. It’s fun to dress up and wear wild and zany colorful makeup and create funny wild hairdos that get attention. But when these products contain toxic petrochemicals, the fun disappears.

    I remember attending Halloween parties with friends and I always had a great time dressing up and checking out everyone’s costume. We always had such a great time trying to guess what someone was supposed to be and admiring the elaborate costume designs. Unfortunately, there was also a down side. Each person had bright or dark colorful thick makeup on and colorful hairspray with funky silver and gold streams sticking out of their hair. As soon as I would get close to someone, I would have trouble breathing, would start coughing, and I’d make a mad dash for the bathroom. At first, I thought I was crazy and I could not understand what was wrong until years later.

    When my husband and I began learning about holistic natural living, we began to question and analyze all the holidays. We were invited to a couple parties, but we started turning down invitations. I was no longer interested in wearing funky or sexy costumes with wacky colorful makeup because I could not find anything fun that was nontoxic. All those crazy facial makeup applicators and the silver and gold aerosol junk you put in the hair are permeated with toxic petrochemicals. That shiny silver and gold stuff that you use to draw lines and decorations around your eyes and on your cheeks is filled with petroleum, potentially toxic food dyes, and horrible fragrance.

    Those petrochemicals contain coal tar, the same smelly toxic chemicals that are used to pave roads and repair leaky roofs. Essentially, you’re putting gasoline on your face and in your hair! If you find this gross and appalling, then you’re paying attention. It is cheap and massively distributed to all cheap dollar stores and can make people very ill. The fumes from the adulterated scented products pollute the air, groundwater, and wildlife.

    An ugly horror is the fact that when toxic petrochemicals - pesticides, lawn treatment chemicals, perfumes, commercial fertilizers, and various other toxic petrochemicals - are sprayed into lawn grasses, trees, foliage, and flowers, the Fairies are usually present, hovering around the plant-life, caring for and being Stewards for these plants. The harsh petrochemicals are sprayed right into the Fairies' faces, suffocating them, choking them, and making them severely ill! It is an absolute horror and it cannot continue!

    The Fairies are delicate, fragile, vital integral parts of the Mystical, Spiritual, Unseen world and they rely on us to protect and respect them and their world. The Fairies carefully watch over and act as protective stewards to the Plant and Animal Kingdom and they need to be in good health to continue their vital work. This won't happen if their air is being made toxic with harmful toxic pollutants. The packaging winds up in a toxic landfill, where the toxic plastic will never biodegrade.

    If you want to have fun and get dressed up in some wild funky colorful costumes and makeup, opt for something that is safe enough to eat. Aubrey Organics and Aveda make some beautiful makeup, including some playful, funky, wild colors. There is no reason that you can’t have fun in a nontoxic earth friendly manner. Pure organic plant essences are safer for the environment and the recycled packaging they come in can either be reused or recycled. The cheap inexpensive little makeup applicators you find in the bargain stores are better off ignored.

    A really good way to enjoy Halloween and the Holiday Season is to make your own non-toxic earth-friendly makeup and check out some books with some good non-toxic tips. This Halloween, make a strong statement that tells the world that you genuinely care about Mother Earth and all Her Beautiful Creatures. Show the world that you know what it means to be a Pagan and that you are no longer willing to patronize those companies that only care about profit margin, even if it means polluting the environment.

    A true Pagan honors all the Natural Elements, the Moon, the Sun, the Stars, and knows the true meaning of respecting Mother Earth. Getting dressed up in your favorite colorful costume with festive makeup isn’t about playing games and acting foolish. Halloween is a special day about honoring our Spiritual Ancestors and Honoring the Spiritual Unseen World. The best thing we can do to protect and respect the Fairies, Spirit, and Unseen World and correct this horrible problem is to become avid strict label readers and vote with our wallets.

    Say “No” to greedy multi-nationals! Say “Yes” to organic, green, earth friendly conscious companies that care about Mother Earth, the humans, and the animals. Eat, live, shop, and be Green! Shopping at your local natural health food store and purchasing only those products and items that are 100% green, organic, and earth friendly, nontoxic is the best thing people can do to contribute to a cleaner greener Earth and reduce our carbon footprint upon Mother Earth.

    ********************

    Dayna Colvin resides in the Pacific NW with her husband. She is an advocate of environmental awareness and as a voice for compassion for animals. She has worked with Greenpeace and other similar organizations in raising awareness to the importance of wholeness, as well as environmental understanding.

    Upon seeing the dramatic positive results from her healthy choices, Dayna decided to share her knowledge, wisdom, and experience with the world.  This resulted in a series of articles and prose, as well as three nonfiction alternative health books and two unique visionary environmental adventure romance novels. Her organic beauty book teaches people how they can enjoy clean, organic, nontoxic, earth friendly beauty, using only 100% pure organic plant essences, completely FREE of harmful petrochemicals.  Her book teaches people how to distinguish and discern the truth from the lies that the multi-nationals are so good at shoveling with their obscene billion-dollar advertising, including how to read a product label.   To read more about Dayna and her writing, please visit the following web site: http://bodyearthself.blogspot.com


  • Friday, October 24, 2014 11:53 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Your Belly Microbiome:

    Not Yet Ready for Roundup®

    by Lisa Sarasohn


    I thought I was through writing about your gut microbiome, the population of 100 trillion bacteria that dwell in your belly.


    In previous posts I've written extensively about your belly bacteria, how they outnumber the cells in your body that carry your personal brand of DNA by a factor of 10 to 1.


    How the diversity of species within your microbiome and their relative numbers shape your physical and mental health, from autism and depression through irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on to obesity.


    How the ways you move and breathe, how the drugs you take, how the fermented foods you eat can make-or-break your gut microbial well-being.


    In short, you need the trillions of beneficial bacteria in your gut to be alive and kicking. They're essential to your welfare. Kill them off and you're in trouble deep.


    Trouble Deep


    Here's the news: Eat GMO foods -- foods made with Genetically Modified Organisms (lifeforms formerly known as "plants") -- and their weed-killer residues kill beneficial bacteria in your gut.


    How does this happen?


    Genetically Modified (GM) wheat, corn, soy, sugar beets, and other crops now grow in fields doused with Roundup®, trade name for the herbicide that delivers the lethal ingredient glyphosate. These genetically engineered crops are "Roundup® Ready," meaning that they're engineered to grow (albeit with reduced nutrient uptake) in the midst of chemical warfare on weeds.


    Although these plants survive the herbicide onslaught, they absorb glyphosate as they grow. Eat 'em, and you're delivering glyphosate to your digestive system.


    But the beneficial bacteria in your belly are not Roundup® Ready.


    Glyphosate eliminates these beneficial bacteria and their capacity to neutralize other microbe types that are up to no good. The glyphosate also interferes with your gut bacteria's ability to produce the four essential amino acids (constituents of vital proteins) that your body, being a mammalian body, is incapable of making.


    Your Friend Tryptophan


    One of these essential amino acids is tryptophan. Mess with your belly bacteria's production of tryptophan and you're messing with your brain's supply of serotonin, a neurotransmitter crucial to stabilizing both mood and appetite. Lose out on serotonin and you open the door to depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, overeating, and many other miseries.


    For a dramatic account of what can happen when a person's brain becomes deprived of serotonin, listen to Dr. Vince Gilmer's story on This American Life.


    But wait -- there's more, much more.


    For the details, you can read the paper by Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff enticingly titled Glyphosate's Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases.


    Although I'm a biochemistry aficionado, you may not be. Alternatively, you can turn to Prevention's take on their paper here.


    Harmless To Humans?


    Samsel and Seneff name "glyphosate's ability to disrupt the gut bacteria" as one of the most important factors contributing to the chronic diseases increasingly common in Western culture:


    Contrary to the current widely-held misconception that glyphosate is relatively harmless to humans, the available evidence shows that glyphosate may rather be the most important factor in the development of multiple chronic diseases and conditions that have become prevalent in Westernized societies. In addition to autism, these include gastrointestinal issues such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic diarrhea, colitis and Crohn's disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, depression, cancer, cachexia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and ALS, among others. (Entropy 2013, 15, 1443)


    Look in on interviews with wisewoman Dr. Stephanie Seneff here and here. Check out conversations with Anthony Samsel here and here.


    Monsanto brought glyphosate to the U.S. in the form of Roundup® in 1974. Given the story that the herbicide's safe to use, Americans have applied the weed- killer more and more lavishly.


    Today, more than 100 million pounds of Roundup® land on American lawns and farms each year.

    Global use of glyphosate-type herbicides now amounts to more than 900 million pounds annually.


    As Samsel and Seneff note:


    The notion that glyphosate has minimal toxicity in humans, widely popularized by


    Monsanto, has prevented farmers from using caution in their application of this chemical to their crops. (Entropy 2013, 15, 1442)


    Further Developments


    As might be expected, the extravagant and widespread use of Roundup® has spurred the evolution of mutant ninja -- a.k.a. glyphosate-resistant -- weeds. Which in turn has incited more intensive use of the herbicide. The chemical companies are developing new products to apply in tandem with the weed-killers already in their inventories.


    What to do?


    Stay tuned for the next month's post.


    © 2014 Self-Health Education


     


    ***************************************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!
    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~

  • Thursday, October 16, 2014 2:54 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)
    Miso Making: Notes and Recipes
    offered by Linda Conroy

    www.moonwiseherbs.com


    Recently I offered a talk to an eager group of people on the topic of miso and fermented soy. While putting my notes together for this talk I realized that is it is impossible to talk about miso without discussing the way that Asian cultures have historically ingested this fermented food. The Japanese recognize that soybeans need careful processing to remove naturally occurring substances that are harmful to humans. They eat fermented soy products i.e. miso, tamari and tempeh, along with lots of other foods that have significant nutritional value. For example if you go out to dinner at an authentic Japanese restaurant you will be served miso soup with seaweed, burdock and fish or meat. These foods compliment each other and contribute a wide array of nutrients to a seemingly simple soup. 
    One account I read described soups made of fish. These soups include the organs and bones, and are considered strengthening foods and good for anemia. Carp soup is traditionally given to women after childbirth. It is made from the whole carp, including the head, bones, eyes and all the organs except the gall bladder, and cooked four to eight hours with barley miso and burdock root.
    This tradition of ingesting fermented soybeans has been translated in western culture into the ingestion of unfermented soy as a protein source. If you tour the health food as well as conventional grocery stores of today you will find soy in a high percentage of products on the shelf. Most Americans ingest unfermented soy several times a day, some on purpose and some inadvertently. According to Naturopath Linda Melos, independent research studies shown unfermented soy to cause hypothyroidism, pituitary insufficiency, infertility and other endocrine disruptions with as little as 2 tablespoons per day. She states that soy can produce asthma and other allergic reactions, immune system problems, irritable bowel syndrome, cancers of the digestive system and liver as well as infantile leukemia. So our translation of and the hard core marketing of unfermented soy products may be leading unsuspecting consumers down the road to poor health.
    Miso on the other hand is a traditional Japanese condiment. It is a fermented soy product that when eaten in a traditional context; combined with shredded burdock, seaweed and a meat or fish broth has exceptional nutritional value. Miso can also be made by fermenting barely, rice, adzuki beans and/or wheat. Tamari is the liquid that results from the miso making process; it is preferred to Soy Sauce which is not a fermented food.
    Soy like most beans has anti-nutritional qualities that need to be broken down before they are ingested or they will cause a wide spectrum of digestive distress as well as nutrient depletion. Generally speaking beans are well soaked to neutralize the phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors they contain and to break down difficult to digest complex sugars. Simply soaking cannot break down enzyme inhibitors in soy; they are only deactivated through the fermentation process. For an extensive discussion on the topic of unfermented soy and the problems associated with it see http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/the-ploy-of-soy/. Also note that it is best to purchase soy products that have been grown organically and that are not genetically engineered.
    Miso is made by inoculating rice with a culture called Koji (Aspergillus oryzae). This rice is then added to cooked soy or other bean and/or grains and left to ferment for 3 months or longer; sometimes as long as 10 years. Note that Koji is a culture that synthesizes vitamin B, thus offering this nutrient to the body. If you would like to learn to make your own Miso at home get a copy of the book Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz. I made two batches this winter and they are fermenting as we speak!!
    Miso also contains minerals such as iron and trace minerals such as: zinc, manganese, and copper. A single tablespoon of miso can contain as much as 2 grams of protein During the second world war Dr. Shinichiro Akizuki, director of Saint Francis Hospital in Nagasaki and his associates spent years treating atomic bomb victims. Although they were just a few miles from ground zero, neither he nor his staff suffered from the usual effects of radiation. Akizuki hypothesized that he and his associates were protected from the deadly radiation because they drank miso soup everyday. In 1972 this hypothesis was confirmed when researchers discovered that miso contains dipilocolonic acid, an alkaloid that chelates heavy metals and discharges them from the body. Note that seaweed and burdock also bind with heavy metals and carry them out of the body. Eating these three foods together is a powerful ally for optimal health.

    ***********************************
      Making Miso:

    ~It is ideal to make Miso during the cooler months. Fall and into winter.
    ~You will need to decide if you are going to make your own starter culture.
    The starter culture for Miso is called Koji. The starter is made up of a fungus, Aspergillus oryzoe which is traditionally grown on rice. You can make or purchase Koji. If you decide to make your own  you will need to purchase the spores.  
    White Rice is typically used to make koji, brown rice can be used if the bran is removed or minimized. Pearled Barley is used when making barley miso and many other substrates have been used. Rice needs to be steamed, not cooked.
    For the best instructions on making koji see the Book of Miso by William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi
    Miso Recipe:
    ~4 cups whole dry soybeans (soaked for 10 hours and drained)
    ~1/2 cup salt
    ~10 cups Koji
    1.     Cook beans until soft, up to 4 hours or you can cook in a pressure cooker.
    2.     Strain beans and retain liquid.
    3.     Take 2 cups of the bean liquid and add the salt to dissolve.
    4.     Mash the beans to the texture that you like.
    5.     Once everything is cool to the touch, add the brine and Koji to the beans. Mix thoroughly.
    6.     Pack the Miso into a crock or a glass jar.
    7.     Heavily salt the top of the Miso. *You will be removing the salt, so do not be afraid to heavily salt it.
    8.     If using a crock put a plate on the top of the miso and add a weight to keep the paste under the liquid.
    9.     With a jar, it is best to use a small mouth jar, as this will help to keep the miso under the liquid. Incubate or ferment at 77 degrees.
    10.  This can be decanted after 4 weeks and can be fermented for up to 8 weeks. *this sweet miso is fermented for a short time. Many other styles of miso are fermented for 1,2 3 or more years. I have had delicious homemade Miso that was fermented for 5 years.
    Salad dressing is something I have not purchased in a very long time. Back when I did purchase it, the ingredient list, no matter how “organic”, always contained something I had concerns about. As a result, I began making my own dressing and will never turn back. It is so simple and one of the most nourishing things we put on the table.
    Here are a list of reasons I make my own dressing:
    1. I know what goes into it.
    2. I can choose ingredients that add to the nutrient density of my meal. In other words, I am getting my vitamins and minerals from my salad dressing.
    3. I get to put my wonderful herbal infused vinegars and occasionally an herbal infused oil to the dressing (which lends itself to #2). Vinegar is a great medium for extracting vitamins and minerals as well as supporting the body in assimilating them.
    4. I can add new ingredients along the way, making each dressing unique and interesting.
    5. This dressings also makes a great dipping sauce for bread, vegetables and whatever else you are inclined to dip.
    6. I can make enough for a week or two in 5 minutes.
    Adding herbs through infused vinegars and/or oils adds to the dressings the nutrients that the vinegar and/or oil extract from the plant. Vinegar will extract a wide spectrum of vitamins and minerals and provides the perfect menstruum for nutrient absorption. And if you use raw apple cider vinegar you benefit from the extra nutrients in the vinegar.
    I often serve this dressing at class lunches, wild eats dinners and during the apprenticeship program. I am often asked for the recipe, so here it is. Enjoy!
    Salad Dressing and/or Dipping Sauce
    1 cup Olive oil
    1 TBS miso paste or more to taste (in addition to our own homemade miso, we like South River Miso. Of course you can use any Miso paste that you have access to)
    1-2 TBS raw local honey
    ½ cup apple cider vinegar
    ¼ cup Tamari or Shoyu (another fermented soy type sauce)
    Combine above ingredients in jar and shake or wisk together.
    I sometimes add buttermilk which thickens it and adds a creamy texture.
    You can also add ground flax seeds, ginger, and/or garlic to make an Asian-inspired dressing.
    This can be used on salads, any vegetable dish, grain dishes and/or as a marinade. The more miso you add the thicker the dressing will be.
    Of course those of you who are like me, a scratch cook, you will add whatever you have available to create your very own version.
    Resources
    Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon
    Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz
    Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery
    Full Moon Feast by Jessica Prentice
    The Book of Miso by William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi (this wonderful resource is available as a download for free.
    To purchase Koji and to order delicious Miso: South River Miso Company http://www.southrivermiso.com/
    To purchase Koji and other cultures: Gem Cultures: http://www.gemcultures.com/index.htm



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Wednesday, October 08, 2014 2:08 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    Finding the Power Within ~ Aries Super Full Moon

    by Kathy Crabbe


    It’s the Aries Full Moon on Oct. 8th and it’s gonna be intense so, as usual I’ve channeled a Creative Soul Challenge based upon a card chosen from my Creative Soul Deck along with a Gemstone Healing Song to be sung by the light of the full moon. I’ve also channeled a Creative Soul Body Challenge which I’ll be sharing with my Creative Soul Circle; my Facebook group that you are welcome to join.


    Full Moon in Aries ~ October 8, 2014 ~ 3:50 am Pacific time


    Creative Soul Challenge ~ How to find the power within


    Whether we have power, are seeking power or are power-less; we all have the power of choice. Will we choose life or death? And if death chooses us, do we choose to die gracefully or kicking and screaming; resisting every step of the way?


    No path or choice is inherently right or wrong; it’s your choice. So how can you be of service to others who are making hard choices?


    This Aries Full Moon we are being challenged to examine one hard choice we’ve had to make that felt out of our control and to ask ourselves: “Why did it feel that way?”


    Let yourself meditate upon this choice for a while before responding. Then write out a strong affirmative statement proclaiming all you’ve learned and been blessed with due to making this hard choice.


    Full Moon in Aries Healing Gemstone: Fire Opal


    fire opalSong of the Fire Opal

    My love is in bloom

    for You for You

    I pray to La Lune

    for You for You

    I sing this tune

    for You for You

    My breath, my heart, my soul, my gifts

    for You for You

    I am transfixed

    for You for You

    transformed

    for You for You

    Blessed to Be

    for You for You

    just me

    more me

    me me meeeeeeeeee…


    Take a look now at the intentions you set at the New Moon (Sept. 23). How have they blossomed? If you didn’t set intentions, what is coming to fruition for you right now?


    With this Full Moon occulting (very very close to) Uranus and trining Uranus, Mars and Jupiter along with a Lunar Eclipse and Mercury Retrograde, we are stripping away facades, going deep within and seeking inner truths about ourselves and our creative fire.


    How can “Fin”, this month’s Full Moon card assist you with that? Ask Fin right now.


    Fin by Kathy Crabbe (Creative Soul Card)


    Creative Soul Card: Fin


    Fin’s Song


    This is the end, my friend

    This Tall Tale ends here

    with you

    You, who are brave and true

    You

    who stand tall and true

    You

    who chooses to be true

    to you, you, you.





    Creative Soul Suggestions for your Circle from my Goddess Zodiac Book

    • Element: fire
    • Color: red
    • Gemstone: amethyst, diamond, fire opal, garnet
    • Plant/Tree: aloe, dandelion, holly, mustard, thistle
    • Herb/Spice: broom, cayenne pepper, garlic
    • Food: onion, pepper, radish, rhubarb
    • Animal Spirit: ram, red hawk
    • Tarot Card: Empress, Emperor
    • Goddess: Amazon, Fuji, Kali, Sekhmet, Valkyries




    Kathy Crabbe is a Creative Soul Guide, artist, educator and writer who has devoted her life to exploring spirituality and creativity with passion and integrity. Kathy empowers soul-seekers to live the life of their dreams through inspirational art, online resources, Divine Feminine eClasses and Creative Soul Readings infused with a rich background in the arts.

    Kathy's work has been published and shown throughout the world at museum shows, galleries, magazine and books. She maintains a regularly updated blog, portfolio site and Etsy Shop.

    Kathy received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Queen's University and a Graphic Design & Illustration Diploma from St. Lawrence College, Kingston, Canada.

    Kathy received intuitive training from English psychic and channel, Adam Higgs and spiritual training from meditation teacher Om (devotee of Sri Chinmoy). She studied yoga with Atma Khalsa and Amanollah Ghahraman, Herbalism with Susun Weed (Green Witch Intensive) and Therapeutic Touch with Joyce Fournier, RN.

    Kathy received her certification in crystal healing from Katrina Raphaell's Crystal Academy and has been a lifelong student of astrology through private study and group sessions with Steven Forrest, Laura DesJardins and Jeffrey Wolf Green. Learn more here.
  • Tuesday, September 30, 2014 6:44 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    HEALING THE WOUNDED MASCULINE


    Written & Illustrated by Roslyne Sophia Breillat

    The patriarchy that currently rules our outer world apparently seems to be ruling this world from a place of masculine power. And yet true masculine power does not arise from corruption, force, greed and the desire to dominate, control and destroy of the distorted masculine. True masculine power arises from a centered inner place of masculine authority, straightness, truth, clarity and strength and the desire to protect, sustain and build of the pure masculine.

    The forceful ways now dominating the world and the Earth arise from the core of the wounded man, for it is not only women and children who are wounded by living within the disturbing imbalances of a male dominated world. His wound has isolated and separated him from love, from the nurturing and powerful womb of the Earth, from his desire for true brotherhood, from his love of nature and from his love of the feminine, within and without. And when he lives in such isolation and separation, he becomes violent, cruel, controlling and afraid. Instead of protecting the women and children of his family, his home, his community, his tribe, his country, he goes to war with himself, he denies his true nature, he loses his humbleness, his humility and his innate ability to live harmoniously in union with this beloved Earth Mother as a true spiritual warrior, a true and peaceful and loving man.

    And so he wanders, restless, lost and afraid, his face a hardened mask of controlled determination, amidst the alleys, laneways, streets and highways of contemporary society, listening to his mind, alienated from his heart. And so he sits, for long, long hours, staring into the distorted reality of cyberspace, losing his power and his authority within the delusions and illusions of his myriad techno realm inventions, moving ever faster, moving ever deeper, into his thoughts, away from his body and away from his naturally grounded place upon this Earth.

    And so the feminine weeps, rages, roars, as she moves ever deeper into the deep, silent well of her wisdom, her power, her depth, her love, calling him home to his true place with her, with the Earth, with his love. And many beautiful, wonderful men are hearing her call, hearing the call of the feminine and of the Earth, yearning to live once again from the true power of their strength, their authority, their truth. And yet many men do not hear the vibrance, the passion, the sweetness of this call, for they are unable to listen, to hear, to see what they are doing to themselves, to the feminine, to the Earth.

    We cannot live in harmony in this world until these wounds are healed, until the wild beauty, feminine power and peace filled wisdom of the Earth are honored, sustained, supported, nurtured, protected, loved, every moment, for we, masculine and feminine, live within Her and She lives within us, as one, as wholeness, as truth.


    Copyright ~ Roslyne Sophia Breillat ©

    Not to be reproduced without written permission of the author..

    Sophia is a wise woman who lives, writes, and paints from the heart. Her prolific articles and paintings

    embrace the wisdom and grace of the female essence and the beauty of the Earth. She is acknowledged as a powerful and courageous writer whose creative work features in many international websites and magazines. Her website is an abundant offering of female wisdom that nurtures and inspires. Sophia is the author and illustrator of two books, WOMB OF WISDOM, THE SACRED JOURNEY OF MENOPAUSE and HEART OF THE EARTH, NURTURING THE SACRED FEMININE




    Sophia (Roslyne Sophia Breillat) is a woman who lives, writes and paints from the heart. The inner richness and profound healing of her life experiences are inspiration for her flowing creativity.

    Her articles and art embrace the beauty, power and sensuality of the feminine essence and celebrate the natural flow of woman's transformational cycles. Her website offers a sacred space for woman to dive into the deep, to open to her true nature, to be who she really is.

    Sophia's training and experience includes primal therapy, intuitive massage, reconnective healing, writing, art and design, astrological counselling, instructional skills, training program design and teaching within the Aboriginal community. She has also facilitated many creative and inspiring workshops and courses.
     

    Sophie offers two courses at the Wise Woman University:


    ~ Being Woman ~ (detailed description of Being Woman online course)


    This six week online course provides a sacred and nurturing space where woman can learn to surrender more deeply to the natural receptivity of the female psyche. "...so blessed to have had gentle words of encouragement and support from you through the "Being Woman" course at W.W.U.... You have inspired me to continue my quest... Thanks so much!"

    ~ Dawning of Wisdom ~ (detailed description of Dawning of Wisdom online course)

    Throughout this series of lessons she will learn to trust the innate flow of her intuitive nature and to listen more intimately to the wellspring of her inner source. And we will explore together how to live more fully as the embodiment of the feminine essence within the structures of a masculine civilisation. "I LOVE your class, it is beautiful and thought provoking and well done... Thank you Sophia for your role as wisdom keeper, confidante and mentor."

  • Thursday, September 25, 2014 9:54 AM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    You, Luna, Universe: Part Two

    by Lisa Sarasohn
    lisa@loveyourbelly.com

    © 2014 Self-Health Education




    As I wrote last month, I learned about The Moon and You: A Woman's Guide to an Easier Monthly Cycle when the author, Barbara Hanneloré, told me she'd selected words from The Woman's Belly Book for her own book's page one. The Moon and You provides an excellent resource for herbalists to use with their clients as a practical handbook for healing pre-menstrual and menstrual distress.


    Added to the pleasure of knowing that The Woman's Belly Book has provided inspiration and support for Barbara's The Moon and You, two threads of interest wrap me up and draw me to this book.


    The first is that providing ways to relieve pre-menstrual and menstrual distress in the context of cultural awareness may be the most direct route for women moving toward honoring the pro-creative power our bellies shelter. 


    The second regards Barbara’s suggestion, in the section titled "Caring for Your Inner Life," to observe the moon's phases as a way to immerse yourself in the relationship between your menstrual cycle and the moon's cycle. She continues: "The moon's cycle is a natural calendar. It was the first calendar...."


    The notion that the moon's cycle was the first calendar has rich implications. As I wrote a few years ago in A New Cosmology: Women’s Bodies Encode What Humankind Needs To Know,


    Astronomical evidence indicates that women’s bodies code the way the world works. Our volumes and curves, our rhythms and cycles, replicate the structure and function of the universe. Beginning with the correspondence between menstrual and lunar cycles, continuing to planetary orbits and beyond, we embody the mathematical relationships implicit in universal principles of time and space.


    How's that for an idea that might change the basis for women's body image -- or, better said, our body confidence?


    Those words encapsulate what I'd learned from reading articles written by and interviewing meterologist Bart Jordan. (A "meterologist" is one who studies measure.)


    Bart's research informs much of The Curse: A Cultural History of Menstruation, written by Janice Delaney, Mary Jane Lupton, and Emily Toth (University of Illinois Press; revised edition, 1988). In particular, they reference "Early Calendrical Art Recreated: A Partial Catalogue,” New England Antiquities Research Association Journal (NEARA) 19, nos. 1, 2 (Summer/FaIl 1984): 1-13 and "Deciphering the Distant Past,” Publick OccurrencesMay 17, 1974, pp. 12-13.


    In the conclusion to The Curse, the authors write that Bart's work demonstrates:


    At least thirty thousand years ago, and perhaps 300 thousand years ago, human beings on this planet were measuring the movement of the stars and planets with a sophisticated system that emanated from, and mathematically depended upon, the human menstrual cycle.

    [Bart Jordan has arrived] at diagrams and symbols based on the 364-day year of 13 moon cycles, the 280-day human gestation period, and the 584-day transit of the planet Venus around the sun...to find, time and again, that the diagrams already existed on the carved tusks, stone earth goddesses (such as the Venus of Lespuges), and other manifestations of what had been believed to be the artistic expressions of a primitive and preliterate people.


    We have seen his drawings and examined the evidence of the archeological finds, only to agree with the staggering fact he is trying to introduce into current scientific thinking.


    What is this staggering fact?


    The Ice Age "art" that is commonly displayed, and the even earlier "art" known to paleontologists and other specialists, is really Ice Age "science." The ancients, the Cro-Magnon ancestors of our human race, were not scratching pretty designs onto their reindeer tusks or fashioning grotesque models of the female form to give vent to their need to make art. They were, in fact, recording their scientific observations on the way the moon and planets and their own earth went through the phases of the year and using the menstrual clock of the women of the society as the observable data from which to draw. 


    They continue:


    Crucial to Jordan's calculations is the difference between the lunar and menstrual calendars. The real lunar calendar, he says, counting the nights when the moon is "dark," is 29.5 days. But the calculations evident in the carved tusks and obese goddesses reflect a calendrical notation of 28 days, and its multiple, 280, the human gestation period. Menstrual averaging was not unknown to our Cro-Magnon ancestors, Jordan believes, and it was this sophistication that enabled them to create symbols in their art (such as the early Greek meander) that were actually representations of the movement of time as measured by the female body clock and its numerical connection to the travels of Venus around the sun. 


    The writers also remark:


    While Bart Jordan's work is entirely original, additional evidence that menstrual calendars were the basis of time measurement in the early Chinese, Mayan, Gaelic, Roman, Aryan, Babylonian, Chaldean, Greek, Egyptian, and pre-Christian European societies is presented in Barbara Walker's The Woman's Encyclopedia of Myths and Spirits (New York, Harper & Row, 1983), pp. 645-49. Walker even notes that the Romans' word for calculation of time is mensuration, or knowledge of the menses, and that the Gaelic words for menstruation and calendar are the same.


    Barbara Hanneloré has given us The Moon and You with a tag line, indicating the benefit that she and her book are promising: Discover your own Inner Rhythms and Take Loving Care of Yourself.


    The book delivers on its promise. What's more, it just might lead us to knowing, in our bones and in our blood, that our woman-body and our woman-being are as sacred as the universe is infinite.



    ***************************************

    My workshops flow from my quest for the Sacred Feminine blended with my experience practicing and teaching yoga.

    I've been a Kripalu Yoga instructor since 1979. I've also trained as a yoga and bodywork therapist.

    From 1981 to 1988, I served on staff at Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Lenox, MA. During this time, I led yoga classes for thousands of guests, conducted a practice in bodywork therapy, designed workshops on many aspects of holistic health, and trained yoga teachers and bodyworkers.

    In the course of my continuing yoga studies, I learned how cultures around the world have valued the body's center as sacred. Delving deeper into this subject revealed connections between the body's center and qualities of the soul, the extent of women's power in family and society, and the degree of a culture's reverence for Sacred Feminine.

    Listen to an interview with Lisa Sarasohn


    Study with Lisa Online!

    ~ From Belly Distress to Belly Health~
    ( Learn More Here )

        Drawing on ancient wisdom and contemporary practice, we'll attend to our bellies' well-being. We'll engage in experiential learning, energizing the body-mind transformation that supports healing.

        
        ~ Initiation 2012: Awakening Your Sacred Center, Part One ~
        ( Learn More Here )

        This online course is the first part of an ongoing process through which you embody the Sacred Feminine by energizing your body's center with breath, image, story, and movement.

         



        (New World Library, 2006) presents what I've learned about the body's center through teaching and research over a period of nearly twenty years.
     
        My articles on honoring the body's center have appeared in publications including Yoga Journal, SageWoman, Radiance, and Personal Transformation. My workshops have been sponsored by colleges and universities, health education agencies, and holistic learning centers.

        My intention is to provide you an opportunity to delight in the vitality and pleasure, the creativity and confidence, the intuition and sense of purpose that already dwell within and emerge from your body's center. My greatest joy is to offer you ways to discover the Sacred Feminine as she already abides within you.
      ~~ Order Here ~~
  • Thursday, September 18, 2014 2:11 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    *Acorn: The Forgotten Nut*
    by Linda Conroy




    Foraging is a lifeway for us and we take every opportunity to harvest. This past week we are harvesting as well as processing some of our fall harvest.
    One of the nuts we harvested in October are acorns. We harvested them here in Wisconsin as well as when we traveled to Kansas for the Mother Earth News Fair. 

    The acorns from Kansas are more than twice the size of the nut here in Wisconsin. So we were very excited, as the larger acorns ultimately mean more yield for us! We have to date put up 30lbs of Acorn flour! We are still processing them, so more to come. This will be our predominant flour for the winter.

    Many people do not think of these as nuts, which is why I call them the forgotten nut. Most people see them as food for squirrels. And while they indeed are food for other critters we can eat them too!

    Oak trees can produce large amounts of acorns. Harvesting and processing them before the weevils turn them into a powdery dust and render them inedible is one of the keys to ending up with delicious flour.

    Historically acorns were an important important food source to North American indigenous people. They were as important as many grains are today.

    Acorns are nutritionally dense, containing protein, minerals, vitamins and fiber.  Acorns have also been tested and shown to have the potential for controlling blood sugar levels.

    In order for humans to ingest this nut the tannins need to be leached out of them. Tannins are organic substances, which occur in plant tissues.
    Tannins in small amounts are not harmful, but in large quantities they can upset your stomach and promote dehydration. Plus they taste bitter and thus make the nut initially unappetizing.

    If you are interested in processing acorns or at least seeing how we process them you can watch our new youtube video below put together by our very own John Holzwart. Thanks John!

    http://youtu.be/T_4Zc55iIEo?list=UUCbOsbgXBghT_eZPJp0EOkg

    We will be adding the flour to many of the dishes we prepare over the next few months, including acorn soup.

    Below is a recipe for this delicious soup. For other recipes, enjoy being creative and introducing acorn flour wherever flour is called for. If you would like your baked item to rise you will need to add something that has a leavening agent, whether it be glutenous flour or some other rising medium.

    I like to use Eikorn wheat for bread and muffins. For flat bread, pie crust and crackers you do not need to add these as there is no need for rising.

    The nut meat of Acorns can be used as is. I have made a chili style dish, added them to tomato sauce in place of meat and simply toasted them and put them on top of salads. As with all wild edibles use your taste buds, imagination and creativity!

    *Acorn Soup Recipe*

    ~Boil in broth cut up carrots and onions until tender (you can use any
    broth, I like to make a rich bone broth, but a chicken, vegetable or
    mushroom broth will work well.

    ~Add ground acorns, dry or wet and simmer for 10 minutes

    ~In the meantime, sautee oil with powdered wild ginger (if you don’t have
    wild ginger you can add cultivated ginger)

    ~Add the boiled vegetables to the sautee pan. Simmer for 20 minutes

    ~Place all of this in a food processor and/or blender. Blend until smooth



     

    Linda Conroy is a bioregional, wise woman herbalist, educator,wildcrafter, permaculturist and an advocate for women's health.

    She is the proprietress of Moonwise Herbs and the founder of Wild Eats: a movement to encourage people and communities to incorporate whole and wild food into their daily lives. She is passionate about women's health and has been working with women for over 20 years in a wide variety of settings.

    Linda is a student of nonviolent communication and she has a masters degree in Social Work as well as Law and Social Policy. Linda has been offering hands on herbal programs and food education classes for well over a decade.

    She has completed two herbal apprenticeship programs, one of which was with Susun Weed at the Wise Woman Center and she has a certificate in Permaculture Design.

    Linda is a curious woman whose primary teachers are the plants; they never cease to instill a sense of awe and amazement.

    Her poetic friend Julene Tripp Weaver, eloquently describes Linda when she writes, "She listens to the bees, takes tips from the moon, and follows her heart."

    Listen to a thirty minute interview with mentor Linda Conroy

     

    Study with Linda Conroy from Home

    ~Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making~
    ( Link to detailed description of Empower Yourself with Herbal Medicine Making )

    The goal of the course is to have participants become familiar with herbal medicine, to become comfortable incorporating herbs into daily life and to gain hands on experience making simple remedies at home.

  • Tuesday, September 09, 2014 3:16 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

    The Tree Pose Vrksasana

    by Sheryl Wolover






    Greetings I'm Sheryl Wolover, native to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.  Mother of two children raised with Susun Weed's herbal infusions  somewhere in the 1980's~
     
    I am the creator of YOGA LEGENDS. Yoga DVD's that link poses together through story telling~  
    Owner of Pacific Elements studio for Massage Therapy (1984) and Yoga classes (2003)~
    My family (including the animal family) live around a beautiful lake side where we garden and gather herbs for food and medicine~
    *=Oceans+Mountains^^^^ of Peace,Sheryl
    http://www.pacific-elements.com/


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