Welcome!

Letting Nature Grow Your Garden, Page 2

Monday, June 04, 2018 8:48 PM | Wise Woman (Administrator)

Letting Nature Grow Your Garden, Page 2
Susun Weed



The next best thing to letting Nature plant your herb garden for you is to put in perennials and let Nature take care of them. You will find the best plants for your area at a plant swap at a local church or school. Nurseries, especially the mail order ones, offer lots of different kinds of plants, but only a few of them will be both productive and carefree.

The most dependable perennial herbs are echinacea, comfrey, elecampane, wormwood, and thyme, on the hardiest members of the aromatic mint family.

Cuttings of various mints are easy to come by and easier yet to establish. Chocolate mint and red bergamot are two of my favorites, but don't be choosy, accept any and all mint cuttings you are given. Perennial aromatic mints -- including lemon balm, lavender, rosemary, thyme, sage, oregano. pennyroyal, and catnip as well as spearmint and peppermint -- form the "backbone" of most herb gardens. Just grow them in full sun in poor soil and don't overwater.

Anyone who has a comfrey plant will be glad to give you a "start" (a piece of the root). And, once put in, comfrey is a friend for life. Ditto rhubarb, whose root is a formidable herbal medicine.

Magazines offer gardening knowledge in small doses, and at appropriate times, instead of all at once, and this is usually more helpful than a book that tries to cover all seasons and all reasons.

    Herbals that include cultural instructions are good additions to your library.


Steven Foster's Herbal Bounty is a classic on "The Gentle Art of Herb Culture." Unfortunately, it is now out of print, but you may be able to find one used. (c. 1984, Peregrine Smith Books). He gives detailed information on the culture, and medicinal uses, of over 100 popular herbs.

Park's Success with Herbs is also out of print but a book that I use constantly. Gertrude Foster and Rosemary Louden fill just under 200 pages with an incredible amount of information on growing and using (lots of recipes) an amazing variety of herbs.

When you try too hard, it doesn’t work. We learn to work with the slow interplay of Yin and Yang. We learn to be in harmony with nature's laws. Forcing things to fit or going against the grain is an unskillful way. We learn to be flexible like water. We use our intuition. We hold, energetically, a magical spot of ground and watch what grows. In Taoism they call it "Wu Wei". We walk in the "effortless", we dance with the fairies, moving in joyful flow with the undulating, magical greenery blowing in the breeze.

Wow! You have a garden! With patience, good weather, and the grace of the Goddess, you and Nature will create a thing of beauty.

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software